Archive for “Parents” Tag

Youth Sports Revolution From Over Zealous Parents and Coaches

 

Athletic Revolution at Full Throttle Athletics: A Revolution From Over Zealous Parents and Coaches In Youth Sports

 

youth sports coaching

By Robert D. Blackford

 

There are certain times in your life that give you pause to stop and say: WOW…..ALL I CAN SAY IS WOW!

 

You aren’t sure if you should be mad, embarrassed or ashamed…this is one of those times.

 

Read this article on youth sports from ESPN:

 

https://espn.go.com

 

In short, it’s the misdirected rant, spit, grit and drill sergeant-esq pep talk of a football coach…directed at (WAIT FOR IT, WAIT FOR IT) 8 year olds in Frisco, TX. Ugh.

 

As a 10 year resident of Frisco this article surprised me but wasn’t entirely shocking. Our family has participated in organized team youth sports, playing coaching and supporting from ages 4 on for our two children.

 

Are we passionate?

 

Yes.

 

Do we offer cheers, advice and criticism at practice and games?

 

Absolutely.

 

Is it as important to participate, learn, grow, and both lose and win? All equally. But there is a level where it’s beyond too far. The article above is evidence.

 

A world apart from the ridiculous behavior referenced in the ESPN article is the weekly program our age 10 and 6 children participate in: Athletic Revolution Frisco (AR). Agility, health, strength, fitness, coordination, and flexibility are the byproducts of what the kids think is nothing more than…well FUN.

 

We joined what appeared to be this professional yet simple, no frills gym at Full Throttle Athletics in Frisco/ Little Elm in 2010-2011. We learned about flexibility, nutrition, strength and endurance. Then we eagerly signed up the kids when the gym launched Athletic Revolution, their youth sports program.

 

After personally observing the interaction with the AR coaches, I can say it’s a revolution from the rant above. Positive reinforcement, actual hands-on coaching and mentoring are the fundamentals taught to AR Champions.

 

Results: faster, stronger and smarter to form the foundation of some lifelong habits. Their progressive nature and sound methodology coupled with everyday sporting fun makes for a great combination. Now the kids look at it like a trip to the park!

 

Want a youth sports revolution from the norm, checkout AR at Full Throttle. You won’t be disappointed.

 

– Robert D. Blackford

 

 

Concussion Prevention: A Pro-Active Approach

 

Concussion Prevention For Young Athletes

 

concussion for high school young athletes

 

By Jim Kielbaso

 

The concussion problem in sports has reached epidemic proportions. The NFL is spending millions on awareness and just instituted new practice rules to reduce the number of blows the players are exposed to during practices. Several high school athletic associations are also implementing new rules to deal with the issue. So far, everything has focused on how to deal with the athlete after the concussion, but there is now a movement to help educate athletes, parents and coaches about sports concussions and what can be done to prevent or avoid them. We’ll never be able to eliminate concussions from sports, but there are certainly things we can do to help reduce the forces our brain encounters.

 


There are really four basic components of concussion prevention:

 

    1. Protective equipment – In most sports, this means properly fit, quality helmets and mouth pieces. Unfortunately, no equipment or training currently known to us will eliminate concussions. “The best helmet on the market can still lead to injuries of the head including concussions,” said Scott Peck, a certified athletic trainer in Washington state. “To decrease concussions, athletes need to practice good technique in tackling and blocking by keeping their heads away from contact.”

 

    1. Technique – Some sports include more contact than others. Good coaches always teach athletes not to initiate contact with the head, but we still see a lot of young athletes using poor form when tackling or hitting.

 

    1. Awareness – It seems crazy, but there are still a lot of parents and coaches who simply do not understand how dangerous a concussion can be or that there is inherent risk involved in participating in most sports. This site was set up to help heighten awareness at the same time we discuss prevention options and proper treatment

 

  1. Training – This component is just now picking up momentum, but some coaches have known about this concept for years. This is also the least publicized aspect of concussion prevention for several reasons.

 

First, most people don’t know how to safely and effectively train the head and neck musculature. Second, it would be next to impossible to produce scientific evidence to show that training will help prevent concussions because you would have to use real human beings and expose them to potentially life-threatening blows. This would never pass any collegiate ethics committee, so the research probably cannot be done.

 

Still, the automotive industry has known for years that a stronger and stiffer neck significantly reduces the G-forces encountered by crash test dummies in crash research. It seems obvious that a stronger neck would be extremely helpful during a blow to the head, but most doctors aren’t yet ready to admit that. That could be because:

 

a. Doctors won’t make any money from the prevention side of this issue.
b. Doctors probably have no idea how to train.
c. Doctors typically refer to the scientific literature, but we already established that this evidence will probably never be published in any scientific journal.

 

We have to understand that no amount of training or equipment will eliminate all injuries, but that is not the point. Ten years ago, ACL prevention programs were virtually non-existent. Today, female athletes all over the country understand that proper training will limit their risk of sustaining an injury. Yet, ACL injury rates haven’t slowed down. It doesn’t mean that the training has not helped. And, going through a training program does not mean you will never hurt yourself. Training is meant to reduce risk or severity of an injury.

 

The same goes for properly training the neck & head to reduce the risk of concussions and serious neck injuries. The training does not eliminate the injuries, but it can help to lessen the risk or severity of neck and head injuries.

 

The leading researcher on neck training, Ph.D. candidate Ralph Cornwell, put it best when he said “If we know that it might help, and it’s not going to hurt, why wouldn’t you want to do this kind of training? People do ACL prevention programs all the time. This is like an ACL prevention program for your brain and neck. You can replace your ACL, but as far as I know, you only have one brain. It just makes sense to protect it.”

 

Research done by the NFL is now revealing that the repetitive sub-concussive blows – the hits that don’t knock you out, but just ring your bell a little – are the main culprit behind the long-term brain damage seen in many former athletes. Many of these athletes are now suing major sports organizations because they are mentally and physically disabled due to these blows. It seems that every brain has a certain number of hits it can take before long-term damage sets in. The more G-forces the brain encounter, the worse it gets.

 

Training can reduce the G-forces encountered on these sub-concussive blows, raising the bar on the number of hits it will take before the long-term damage sets in. This is some of the best news ever presented on this topic, because it gives us hope that we may be able to combat this problem.

 

Major sports organizations like USA Hockey and the NFL are recognizing that something must be done, so rules are changing quickly. Even Dr. Robert Cantu, who is considered one of the leading experts on the subject, has said that he thinks young athletes should wait until they are stronger and more mature before they engaging in intense contact/hitting sports. This means that the leading authority on concussions understands that being stronger will have a positive effect and is part of the concussion prevention equation.

 

With the knowledge that training can help prevent concussion and other injuries and, when done properly, can cause no harm, why would we NOT strengthen the muscles surrounding the head and neck?

 

 

4 Levels of Youth Sports Training Business

 

Youth Sports Training Business Success

Youth sports training business success

 

By Ryan Ketchum

 


Training youth athletes can be hard.

It might be one of the most enjoyable experiences in all of coaching, but it can be difficult to gain traction in your community if you have no previous relationships with coaches or sports organizations. The toughest part, much like any other aspect of business, is getting started. Once you have a little momentum behind you all it takes is consistency to grow your youth sports training business at an incredible rate.

 

For some reason it has taken me a few years to figure out just how easy and simple building your youth sports performance business can be if you follow the right steps.

 

Over the past several months I have implemented this system into our business with great success. It is almost scary how easy it is to follow and how quickly it can have an effect on your bottom line.

 

The greatest part of this system is that it doesn’t require you to be great at marketing or selling. I modified this system so that any coach can sell with the experience of their coaching and the results that come because of their great coaching. All you have to do to make this work is be consistent and dependable.

 

The first level of building an incredible youth sports training performance business is leveraging your network to build relationships with coaches, parents and leaders of youth sports organizations. You should focus on an area that you already have traction in and put all of your energy into it. If you aren’t sure where you might have traction I suggest you focus on middle school or younger athletes and female athletes. Stay away from football unless you are established or have some great connections. Building relationships is easier than most people think, but it requires you to step out of your comfort zone. For a little while you have to take a back seat to being the expert and ask for advice. Call up coaches, parents and organizational leaders and ask their advice on what they see a need for in their sports training. Take them to lunch, grab coffee and don’t step on their toes!

 

Once you have established a relationship and secretly found out what the biggest need in that sports community is (that is why you asked for advice earlier) you can offer a solution. The next step is offering a free clinic to help the coach or organization’s athletes better prepare for their sport. This clinic should be catered to meet the needs that were unveiled by those in your network.

 

To make this clinic extra successful you should have as much done for you material as possible. Write the emails for the coach, set up times that are convenient for the entire team, create the fliers and deliver the copies, etc. The easier you can make it on the coach or those in charge the more likely it is that you will get access to a lot of athletes.

 

When selling this free clinic idea to a coach you must explain how it will help them. How is this going to make their life easier and their athletes better? How can they use this in their practices and training?

 

Once you have established a date and set up the clinic your only job is to show up and be ready to wow the parents, coaches and athletes with your knowledge and coaching ability. Connect with the kids, make it fun and give them what they want. If you can show immediate results and improvement with the kids speed, agility or strength you will have won them over.

 

At the end of this free clinic it is time to move onto the third level. We must speak the language that coaches and parents are used to hearing, we have to do the unspeakable when talking about long term athletic development, we must offer a short term sport specific and skill specific academy!!!!

 

You might be wondering why we would offer a short term program if we have already won these athletes and their parents over?

 

The reason you offer a 6-8 week program to start is because that is what they are conditioned to believe will produce the best results. Create an offering that will help get them prepared for the season or improve a specific skill. The goal for the 6-8 week program is to educate them on the long term athletic development model and continue to build a relationship with the athletes and those in charge.

 

You can offer this program on site at the team’s location or at your own location. Many times it is easier to take the athletes off site to your location. We have got the athletes in our funnel now and we should do our best to move them into our long term training programs.

 

This 6-8 week program should be low cost, with a specific purpose. Our goal here is not to make a lot of money, but rather to gain the confidence of the athletes and the community. It is a great way to “slow cook” your leads and earn their trust. This works particularly well if you are new in the sports performance community.

 

Towards the end of the 6-8 week program you will now attempt to move these athletes on to level 4. This is your long term development program, your core offerings and strength and conditioning program. After 6-8 weeks of education and a phenomenal experience it should be an easy sell to get them into your programs so that they can continue their athletic development with you.

 

The key to transitioning these athletes from the short term to long term program is understanding their needs at the time of the conversion. If they are going in season it would be silly to recommend a three time per week training program, however you could offer a one-time per week program to ensure they maintain their results and continue to make progress so that come playoff time they are in the best condition. If they are going into an off season you will want to make the most appealing offer, which is a complete off season solution for them.

 

To recap here are the 4 levels of youth sports training business success:

Build and develop relationships

 

Set up FREE Clinics

 

Convert into low cost short term programs with specific training focus

 

Convert into long term development program

 

If you follow these simple steps you will have no problem becoming the go-to resource for athletic development and youth sports performance training in your community.

 

 

youth sports training business success

 

Youth Training: Give Your Programs a Boost

 

Youth Training Program Boosting Tips

 

youth training

By Ryan Ketchum

 

Every so often you need to give your Youth Training programs a little boost.  The numbers might be slowly declining, it seems like you cannot generate interest from parents or athletes and you don’t know where to go.   Today I am going to give you three ways to give your youth training programs a boost of new athletes for the coming spring seasons.

 

1. Attend sport registrations- I was sitting at the doctor’s office the other day and picked up the local paper to pass the time waiting for them to see me and I noticed a huge opportunity that we could have missed out on.  In the Sports section we have an activities section in which local sports leagues post their registrations and other events, in that day’s listings were two youth baseball league registrations.

 

I could have breezed through this without much thought, but immediately the thought came back to one of our Athletic Revolution marketing strategies.   One of the easiest ways to get more athletes is to be present at events they attend.  The registration is an event that will promise to have every parent and athlete that wants to play in each league in attendance.
These families obviously spend a little money on their kids’ sports and they want them to be the best athletes possible, no matter their age.  Our business can be in front of hundreds of parents with an incredible offer to get them ready for the season.

 

2. Reactivate all of your previous winter sport athletes- With the winter sports season coming to a close in late February and early March now is the time to start compiling your list of inactive athletes who participate in winter sports.  Create your list and make notes of when their season may end.

 

Within the notes for each athlete you will want to note if they make the playoffs, the season ends as scheduled or if you know they are injured.    You can send a handwritten note to those that make the playoffs congratulating them and letting them know you can’t wait to see them in the offseason.

 

Dear Athlete,
I am very proud of all you have accomplished this season!   Congratulations on helping your team make the playoffs and best of luck in all of your upcoming games.  I will be routing for you the entire way to the championship.    I can’t wait to see you as soon as the season ends to start your training for next year!

 

Signature

Signature

If the athlete is injured or missed the playoffs a simple phone call will work wonders.
Youth Training

These simple follow ups and contacts with your previous athletes are a step above and beyond what any of your competition is doing and will show them how much you care.  It is up to you to reach out and invite them back in to your programs.

Don’t make the mistake of assuming your previous athletes will return automatically.  Be proactive and set up some calls!

 

3. Hold a preseason academy- In Athletic Revolution we call one of our short term programs academies.  One of the best ways to get new athletes in is to start them in a program that involves a short time commitment, helps them get ready for their upcoming season (the one thing that is on their mind at this moment), and can be sport, age, gender and skill specific.

 

With spring right around the corner now is the time to set up your 4-6 week training programs for baseball, softball, tennis, golf or any other spring sports that you would like to work with.  The great thing about these programs is that you can upsell your current athletes into them for more specific training and you can get new athletes in door for your programs.

 

To market these programs you should look at your networking list first.  Find any coaches or parents that you have a relationship with and ask for their help in putting you in contact with the coaches, athletes and their parents.   Starting off with a free 1 hour clinic for them is a great way to get them to buy into your new program.

 

You can also use your leads from the event registrations (hint, hint) to fill these academies.

Once you have the athletes in the academy you will be able to continue to develop a relationship with them and their parents so that you can be their trusted athletic development resource.

The key to making any of these ideas successful is having a great youth training program that gets the results you promise, creating a system for developing your leads, and having the discipline to follow up consistently to develop relationships.

 

Make sure that anytime your program needs a boost you look for places that have a captive audience, seek out athletes in which you have already formed a relationship, and cater to the current needs of the athletes.

 

 

Young Athletes & Their Parents

Do you involve Parents in your Young Athletes training programs?

 

Should you?

 

Does long-term success INCREASE when you do?

 

Why and How you can involve Parents in your facility or Young Athletes training programs to ensure success…

 

 

Speaking Of Long Term Success, Look At This:

 

–> https://CompleteAthleteDevelopment.com

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Training Young Athletes and The Ultimate Blueprint

 

Training Young Athletes Resource

I’ll be blunt with a message heading into your weekend:

 

If Complete Athlete Development is not in your library of educational resources, you are sorely missing out.

  • DVD Collection of Coaching Cues, Training Programs & Exercise Selections
  • Manual with Specifics on Speed, Agility, Coaching, Philosophy of Training
  • Audio CD’s on Nutrition and Strength Development
  • Sample Programs for Training Young Athletes 6 – 18
  • Mix & Match Training Templates
  • 100+ Exercise Photographs

(more…)

The Youth Fitness Difference


Youth Fitness

 

“Fitness” in Early Childhood: Part I

 

This article is Part I of a series by Dr. Kwame M Brown. There will be more to come, including details about programming and resources for our members.

 

I spend all day around preschoolers and parents.  We have a great preschool here at Lee District RECenter in Franconia, VA and the teachers here are all about play!  I don’t regularly work formally with the preschool children, but interact with them and play little games with them throughout the day as they bang on my window, or I see them in the hall, or play hopscotch with them on the sidewalk outside.  Our teachers are wonderful all by themselves and don’t really need me that much. 

 

I am often asked how to do fitness programs for kids at this age.   The answer I often give is that the programming is easy:  Combine outdoor play (mostly) lots of pretend play and obstacle courses.  For older toddlers, you can begin adding simple tag games, crawling or hopping relays, and very simple throw, catch and kick games.  There are tons of great activities available on the web for this age group. 

 

The hard part:  the teaching! 

 

With this group you have to be in equal parts:

 

  1. Understanding
  2. Engaged / Energetic
  3. Patient
  4. Creative
  5. Silly
  6. Uninhibited
  7. Authoritative (for safety only)

 

Running a fitness program for older children and teens is as much or slightly more about the personnel as the program.  Running youth fitness programs for the preschool age is overwhelmingly about the personnel more than the program. 

 

If you consider yourself a fitness professional, or a highly qualified coach, you may not be successful in running preschool program.  If you, on the other hand, consider yourself a play partner, you can be incredibly successful.  Kids will ask when they will see you again.  My assistant and I have kids who run and jump into our arms when we see them!  They know that we are having fun being with them.  They know that we’re not there to get performance out of them, but to enjoy their play experiences alongside them. 

 

youth fitness specialist certification

 

Learn to Train Kids from 6 – 18 (Athletes & Non-Athletes Alike)…

 

with the Youth Fitness Specialist – Level 1 certification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Tragedy We’re Just Going to Accept?

Click Here to read the related article again…

 

"I’m not a crazy mom," said Jennifer Sherman of Ridgewood, who explained that she enrolled her 3-year-old son, Jack, because he is desperate to have his own version of baseball after watching so many of his 9-year-old brother’s games. "He wants to do this."

 

For the record, my 4 year old daughter would ‘want’ to have ice cream every night for dinner… Sometimes, parents and coaches need to be the intermediary between what a child wants and what’s best…

 

Please, leave your comments below:

 

– Brian

Physical Education Injuries: 150% Increase

Physical Education Injuries alarm bells

IYCA Member, Mike Howard, sent me a link to this incredible article.

 

I was floored.

 

Stunned.

 

And completely annoyed.

 

150% increase Physical Education injuries.

 

Read the article and then be sure to leave me your comments about
why exactly you think this has become such a problem.

 

I feel very strongly that I know the answer.

 

And tomorrow I’m going to tell you what it is.

 

But for now, I want to hear your thoughts.

 

Here’s the article:

 

 

New national study finds increase in P.E. class-related injuries

 

Annual number of cases increased 150 percent from 1997-2007

 

Physical education (PE) in schools is one of the main tools used to increase physical activity and to prevent childhood obesity, and PE-related injuries are on the rise. Although increasing physical activity may reduce obesity, it may also increase the risk of injury. While recognizing that PE classes and physical activity are important components in combating obesity, parents and school administrators should remain vigilant for injuries. A recent study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, found that the number of PE-related injuries to elementary, middle and high school students in the United States increased 150 percent between 1997 and 2007.

 

According to the study, published in the online issue of Pediatrics, the most common PE-related injuries were lower-extremity sprains and strains (23 percent), followed by upper extremity sprains and strains (14 percent) and fractures (14 percent). Middle school-aged children (11-14 years of age) accounted for the majority of PE-related injuries (52 percent). Elementary school-aged children (5-10 years of age) had almost double the odds of a head injury, compared with other injuries.

 

Nearly 70 percent of PE-related injuries occurred while children were participating in six activities (running, basketball, football, volleyball, soccer and gymnastics). Injuries were caused by contact with another person, playing surface, equipment, stationary structures, pulled muscles, overuse and activity-related illnesses such as heat stroke.

 

"The 150 percent increase in PE-related injuries presenting to emergency departments was consistent across gender and age groups. It is unlikely that this increase was attributable to an increase in PE participation," explained study author Lara McKenzie, PhD, principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and faculty member of The Ohio State University College of Medicine. "Identifying patterns of PE-related injuries is the first step toward preventing them. Injury prevention education should be made a priority for all PE activities, especially for those activities with the highest injury rates."

 

This is the first published study to examine PE-related injuries on a national level. Data for this study were collected from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), which is operated by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The NEISS dataset provides information on consumer product-related and sports and recreation-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments across the country.

 

Fundamental To Sport Specific Training for Young Athletes

 

 

Young Athletes and Sports Training

Spida Hunter is a one-of-a-kind trainer from New Zealand. He has worked with participants of all ages and abilities. I thought that you might all enjoy a glimpse into how things are done with young athletes on the other side of the world!

 

IYCA: What’s your background in youth sports and athletics? Have you worked with young athletes?

 

SH: I don’t specialize in youth sports or athletics however I do train young aspiring athletes that are looking to produce the best results and performance that they can achieve. I have worked with puberty (and post puberty) athletes which is a very influential age and a very important age not just physically but mentally and emotionally as well! I will also be training a 1st XV high school rugby team next season.

 

IYCA: There are a lot of coaches, parents, and even trainers who treat young athletes as if they were "little adults." What I mean by that is they will take the training routine of a superstar athlete and use it as a guide when working with youngsters. Why, if at all, should we warn them against that kind of training?

 

SH: I used to get very frustrated with the mentality of; this is what they do so you can too! However other then a selected few I truly believe now, is that parents, coaches and unfortunately trainers are actually doing what they believe is the best thing for the young athlete. This is what they know so this is what they hand down I do not believe that a parent, coach, trainer would purposely harm a child through training but unfortunately this is what they do when they treat the child as a "little adult"!

 

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Training Teaching And Coaching Young Athletes

 


 

Coaching Young Athletes

Do you Teach or Train and deliver great coaching young athletes?

 

If you are like most coaches and trainers I am familiar with, you likely ‘train’ your athletes as a means to elicit biomotor improvement.

 

You work on various forms of sprints and jumping in order to develop ‘blazing speed’.

 

You lift weights or perform bodyweight exercises to increase ‘mammoth strength’.

 

You set out cones and have your young athletes practice elaborate movement drills as a way of improving their ‘stealth-like agility’.

 

These types of exercises in themselves are not problematic or bad per say…

 

But they are only quasi-beneficial and extremely narrow-scoped if you aren’t looking to teach your young athletes the skills they need to perform these drills and set them up to improve on the next level.

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Secrets to Young Athlete Rentention

Here’s a brief look at the IYCA Young Athlete system –

 

1) Young Athlete Training SYSTEM, not Training Session

 

School is a ‘system’ that takes years to go through.

 

Parents understand that and are more than willing to pay
and commit their kids into a program that develops them
over time and through progressive phases.

 

This is your selling point for a young athlete.

 

 

2) Per MONTH Fee, Not Per Session Payments

 

Lock the young athlete< ,u> in for longer durations by having them
commit to between 4 – 12 month training packages in which
the monthly fee will be significantly less than a per session
rate.

 

Parents love the ‘price break’ and are more than willing to
keep their kids enrolled in your program.

(more…)

How to Get High School Coaches to Like You

 

 

High School Coaches Do Need You

"The Head Football Coach just won’t listen to me… He
thinks he knows everything, but his training program is
terrible and his team would be so much better if he would
just hire me as the Strength Coach…"

 

Do you know how many times I hear that?

 

I get emails about it.

 

People talk with me about it at conferences.

 

It’s a common topic discussed on the IYCA Message Board.

 

And every single time, the follow up question reads something
like this –

 

"How can I get the Coach to trust and hire me?"

 

And here’s my standard answer…

 

Why would he?

 

From his perspective, who in the heck are you?

 

Do you know many ‘well credentialed’ Personal Trainers
there are in our industry who are absolute crap at what
they do?

 

Now, I’m sure that sounds like a negative slam, but it
really isn’t.

 

It’s a wake up call for you.

 

You have to PROVE to the Coach that you’re better.
Show him that you know more than him and more than
any other Trainers out there.

 

But you can’t prove that by ‘telling him so’ and then
walking away with your hands up in the air angry
that he isn’t listening.

 

I have made a career of gaining the trust of high school
coaches in various parts of the world and literally
having them beg me to train their athletes and teams.

 

Very few people in our industry can boast that kind of
success.

 

And here’s my secret….

 

I get someone else to do the talking for me.

 

Seriously.

 

I use my client referral network. 

 

I chat with satisfied parents who have connection to
the local high school coaches and athletic department and ask them
to consider chatting with the coach about me.

 

And when they do, that opens the door.

 

All I have to do is walk in.

 

Literally, I go from ‘just another Trainer trying to
work with my athletes’ to a ‘fantastic Trainer who is
coming highly recommended by the father of one of my
star players’.

 

See the difference?

 

And it works… Every time.

 

But you know what else works?

 

The right credentials.

 

With a certification from the IYCA, you can proudly
tell the coach that your expert training and education
is BASED on working with young athletes.

 

It’s not a certification that people suggest is the
‘Gold Standard’ but really doesn’t have much to do with
developmental athletic training – something critically
important to high school athletes.

 

And your certification doesn’t come from an organization
who offers 25 different kinds of educational streams from
‘Geriatric Fitness’ to ‘Pre-Natal care’.

 

It comes from an international association whose sole mission
is based on teaching Trainers to work effectively with
young athletes.

 

From Speed Training and Team Program Design to Strength
Development and The Art of Coaching.

 

I take great pride in being a Member of the IYCA.

 

And every single high school coach I have ever
talked with appreciates that I am equipped to work with
there athletes based on my IYCA affiliation.

 

Now that speaks volumes.

 

Our Level 1 – Youth Fitness Specialist certification is
your ticket ‘in’ my friend.

 

Get certified now to work with high school athletes and
teams for a fraction of what you’d have to pay for other
more generic educational opportunities.

 

Below is your exclusive link to the IYCA Level 1
material –

 

https://www.iyca.org/fitspecialist1

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian

 

P.S. – Did  you know that ALL IYCA Members are invited to
the Ryan Lee Boot Camp on September 21 to enjoy a live

 

Level 1 certification seminar being hosted by yours truly…
… For FREE!

 

Enjoy the event live and in person.

 

Ask me ANYTHING you want about training or business and more on high school coaches.

 

All for free.

 

Check out www.RyanLeeBootCamp.com for the details.