Archive for “United States” Tag

Your Success Blueprint for 2011

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Pat Rigsby is an icon.

 

I don’t use that term lightly and no part of me is creating hype.

 

Since becoming a part owner in the IYCA, our organization has blown up worldwide and created opportunities for Fitness Professionals that most had never dreamed possible.

 

Athletic Revolution (another ‘baby’ co-founded by Pat and myself) has 20 locations throughout the United States (already) and is poised to become the largest and most influential franchise of training centers this industry has ever seen.

 

And these are just two of his incredible success stories.

 

So when I mentioned the idea of using a ‘Proven Formula’ to get exactly what you want in 2011 yesterday, Pat Rigsby is the kind of guy I was STRONGLY suggesting you listen to.

 

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Claim Your Seat at the 2010 IYCA International Summit

 

 

IYCA International Summit

How can you begin to know what it feels like to attend the Super Bowl unless you’ve actually been there?

 

The World Cup of Soccer?

 

A concert or ballet that inspires you to create a bigger life for yourself and moves you beyond what words could express

 

Sometimes, you just have to experience it for yourself.

 

Yes, the IYCA International Summit will give you the very best, most cutting edge and world-class training information imaginable.

 

Yes, the IYCA International Summit will give you the most current, success-proven and guaranteed business information possible.

 

The speakers we have booked are the best in the world at what they do.

 

The education we’re going to offer will positively change your career.

 

But maybe bigger than that is the inspirational lift you will get from attending this once-a-year event.

 

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Physical Education Injuries: 150% Increase

Physical Education Injuries alarm bells

IYCA Member, Mike Howard, sent me a link to this incredible article.

 

I was floored.

 

Stunned.

 

And completely annoyed.

 

150% increase Physical Education injuries.

 

Read the article and then be sure to leave me your comments about
why exactly you think this has become such a problem.

 

I feel very strongly that I know the answer.

 

And tomorrow I’m going to tell you what it is.

 

But for now, I want to hear your thoughts.

 

Here’s the article:

 

 

New national study finds increase in P.E. class-related injuries

 

Annual number of cases increased 150 percent from 1997-2007

 

Physical education (PE) in schools is one of the main tools used to increase physical activity and to prevent childhood obesity, and PE-related injuries are on the rise. Although increasing physical activity may reduce obesity, it may also increase the risk of injury. While recognizing that PE classes and physical activity are important components in combating obesity, parents and school administrators should remain vigilant for injuries. A recent study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, found that the number of PE-related injuries to elementary, middle and high school students in the United States increased 150 percent between 1997 and 2007.

 

According to the study, published in the online issue of Pediatrics, the most common PE-related injuries were lower-extremity sprains and strains (23 percent), followed by upper extremity sprains and strains (14 percent) and fractures (14 percent). Middle school-aged children (11-14 years of age) accounted for the majority of PE-related injuries (52 percent). Elementary school-aged children (5-10 years of age) had almost double the odds of a head injury, compared with other injuries.

 

Nearly 70 percent of PE-related injuries occurred while children were participating in six activities (running, basketball, football, volleyball, soccer and gymnastics). Injuries were caused by contact with another person, playing surface, equipment, stationary structures, pulled muscles, overuse and activity-related illnesses such as heat stroke.

 

"The 150 percent increase in PE-related injuries presenting to emergency departments was consistent across gender and age groups. It is unlikely that this increase was attributable to an increase in PE participation," explained study author Lara McKenzie, PhD, principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and faculty member of The Ohio State University College of Medicine. "Identifying patterns of PE-related injuries is the first step toward preventing them. Injury prevention education should be made a priority for all PE activities, especially for those activities with the highest injury rates."

 

This is the first published study to examine PE-related injuries on a national level. Data for this study were collected from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), which is operated by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The NEISS dataset provides information on consumer product-related and sports and recreation-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments across the country.

 

Youth Conditioning Programs Tip of the Week

 

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Youth Conditioning Programs

Why hold on to the ‘norm’?

 

What’s the point of doing what everyone else always has?

 

Case in point.

 

I’ve worked with literally dozens of different high schools
over the past several years and almost always have been
asked to ‘add’ to there already existing programs rather
than re-create a system that I know will work better.

 

It takes time, but eventually the Coaching staff come to
learn that my style of athletic development works better
than what they currently have and turn the reigns
completely over to me.

 

And when that happens, do you know what my first step
is in changing the face of their youth conditioning programs and methods?

 

I separate the freshmen from everyone else.

 

High school represents a perfect developmental model.

 

4-years of having the same athletes – guaranteed.

 

So rather than making the young 14 year olds perform the
same lifts as the 18 year old seniors (and with the same
zeal of heavy loads) I remove them from the equation and
train them as a separate group.

 

We work on things like summation of forces, lift technique
and speed/agility basics.

 

This gives them a solid foundation on which to grow and
ensures they don’t get caught up in the ‘how much can you
lift’ world of high school athletics.

 

By the time they are sophomores, they are much better
equipped to handle loads and perform lifts with more
accuracy and precision.

 

Now this methodology flies in the face of what most high
school athletic programs do.

 

But trust me when I say that it’s a much superior system.

 

Don’t be afraid to go against the ‘norm’ with Youth Conditioning Programs.

 

Carlos Alvarez, looked at as the best high school
strength coach in the entire United States, will be discussing
topics just like this one next month at our International Summit.

 

MORE than worth taking a look at –

 

http://www.iyca.org/2009summit

 

 

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Brian

 

 

 

Exercise Programs For Kids: 3 Key Elements…

 

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Exercise Programs For Kids Done Right

There’s 3 key elements you have to understand when it comes to exercise programs for kids.

 

And these things AREN’T taught in your standard adult based fitness certifications…

 

 

A record setting 1 million clients under the age of 18 hired a personal trainer in the United States alone in 2007.

 

Our industry is changing rapidly and the following video will explain why your current credentials may not be enough…

 

 

Leave your comments below and let me know what you think on exercise programs for kids and certifications.