Archive for “Speed Certification” Tag

Strength And Conditioning Coaches Misuse of Speed & Agility Training


Strength And Conditioning Coaches Often Overlook Movement

By Jim Kielbaso




A lot of people in this field call themselves Strength &
Conditioning Coaches.

I don’t have a problem with the “Strength” part of the title, but the
“Conditioning” part could use a little work.

 

As a former college S & C Coach, I fully understand the time
constraints of the collegiate or high school environment. Running a
private facility for athletes, I also understand the limitations of
this situation. In both cases, it is very difficult to give every
athlete the time and instruction they need. Still, there is one area of
our profession that I feel is in desperate need of some attention.

 

That area is what I call Movement Training.

 

Recently, I was asked by a college coach what mistakes I have made in
the past and what I would do differently if I could re-live the past
6-10 years of my career. At first, like many coaches, my ego didn’t
want to admit to any mistakes, especially to another coach. But, after
some thought, I realized that the area in which I have the greatest
impact on athletes today, I simply did not understand when I was
younger.

 

A few years ago, I thought the best S & C Coach was the one who
most fully brutalized his/her athletes. I thought I was supposed to
lift my athletes until they puked and condition them until they
couldn’t see straight. Don’t get me wrong, I still think that stuff has
its place. I love putting athletes through brutally hard workouts, and
I think that kind of hard work can have amazing benefits (it also has
terrific entertainment value). But, through time, I have gained a
better understanding of how to maximize the “Conditioning” or “Speed
and Agility Training” part of my job title.

 

To a lot of coaches, conditioning means creating running programs that
enhance the physiological processes involved in aerobic or anaerobic
metabolism. You may not think of it this way, but that is essentially
what many conditioning programs are designed to do. I have no problem
with this. Conditioning sport-specific energy systems is a vital part
of athletic success.

 

Many coaches also implement speed, agility, and plyometric routines
into their programs, and I think it’s great to see coaches making an
effort to improve the physical abilities of their athletes.
Unfortunately, I see way too many mistakes being made in this area, and
I think many coaches are doing their athletes an injustice.

 

Over the years, we have read articles by some great coaches about
specificity, but the full message of these wise men is often lost in an
effort to use their message to support our own views. I’m sure you’ve
done it. You’ve read an article, and thought to yourself “That’s what
I’m talkin’ about. That’s why I do what I do. I’m going to use this
article to support my training philosophy.”

 

The articles have been great. They have helped a generation of S & C Coaches
formulate their strength training philosophies….strength
training philosophies. Why didn’t we see that the same information
we’ve applied to strength training can also be used to develop
effective speed and agility programs?

 

In my opinion, a lot of S & C Coaches approach speed and agility
training the same way they approach strength training. They find out
what other coaches are doing (through reading summer manuals, watching
workouts, etc.), and duplicate it in their environments. This has
worked out pretty well for strength training because there are a lot of
good Strength and Conditioning Coaches

 

Unfortunately, there are a few problems with learning about speed and
agility this way. First, there are not nearly as many quality speed and
agility coaches to learn from. Second, most of us didn’t learn anything
about effective movement patterns in school. Third, proper coaching of
speed and agility is highly dependent on coaching prowess, movement
analysis, and the ability to understand proper movement patterns. It is
more like teaching a sport skill; instructor knowledge is vital, and
you can’t just apply a cookie-cutter approach like many coaches do with
strength training. Nonetheless, we’ve learned our speed and agility
drills from Strength Coaches not Speed and Agility coaches. The best
case scenario for many of us was to learn a few drills from a track
coach or catch an article outlining a couple of exercises.

 

This kind of coaching just doesn’t cut it. I believe that movement
training falls under the “Conditioning” part of our job title, and it’s
time we take full responsibility for this important part of our jobs.

 

I like to call speed and agility work “movement training” because the
goal is to train athletes how to move more efficiently. The problem
with most movement training is the assumption that if we put some cones
or hurdles out in a cool design and have our athletes run through them,
we are making an impact on their movement patterns. The truth is, we’re
not. All we’re doing is helping them reinforce whatever movement
patterns they are using to get through the drill. Take a few minutes to
re-read some of those specificity articles, and I think you’ll see
exactly what I’m talking about.

 

I have had the good fortune of working with, observing, and Strength And Conditioning Coaches
from a lot of good sport coaches and instructors. I have never seen a
good basketball coach allow players to take hundreds of jump shots with
poor shooting technique, and I have never seen a good baseball coach
let players pitch and hit with poor mechanics. Unfortunately, I have
seen a lot of Strength and conditioning Coaches
allow athletes to perform hours of agility drills using horrible technique.
A lot of coaches assume that if the athletes are going through the drills, their athleticism
will improve. But, the benefits of performing speed and agility drills are
dramatically reduced if the athletes are not executing them with sound
mechanics and learning proper technique. If the coach is unable to
analyze the movement and give corrective feedback, what good is he/she
doing for the athletes?

 

There are still a lot of questions about movement training, but there
are certainly some answers and a lot of room for us to improve. I look
forward to examining this misunderstood aspect of our profession in
more detail with you in the future.


IYCA Member Spotlight: Melissa Lambert


IYCA Youth Fitness Specialist Spotlight

IYCA youth fitness specialist

 

I am licensed professional counselor in the state of Connecticut
and work as a child and adolescent clinician at Natchaug Hospital.
I graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Eastern
Connecticut State University and was a four year collegiate soccer
player earning All-Region and All-New England accolades as a
defender. I completed my Master’s degree in Clinical Mental
Health Counseling with a concentration in child and adolescent
psychology at Springfield College.

 

My experience includes working inpatient, partial hospital
programs, in-home therapy for children and adolescents in crisis, facilitating
parenting classes and writing articles for parenting magazines. I
enforce the importance of movement and play with both children
and their families. I also work on youth nutrition with children

who are currently taking psychiatric medications that often
cause weight gain.

 

In addition, I’m an assistant soccer coach for the U-16 girls’
Southeast Premier Soccer Club and run high school soccer
strength and conditioning clinics. I currently have the following

IYCA
certifications: Youth Fitness Specialist 1, High School
Strength and Conditioning, Youth Nutrition and Youth Fitness

for children with Special Needs.

The IYCA certifications have Impacted my work as both a therapist and coach.

 

I feel the overall philosophy of the program can be utilized when
working with any group of kids, whether it’s fitness related or not.
The IYCA emphasizes building upon the child’s current strengths
while empowering them to become better athletes with a focus
on injury prevention. I like the break down on how to work with

specific athletes based on both the level of skill and motivation.

 

The course material is easy to understand and can be applied
in various environments. I use many of the youth nutrition
handouts with both children in therapy and my high school
athletes as well as incorporating the games from the youth
fitness certification into group therapy.

 

In relation to coaching, my strength and conditioning clinic
sessions were based on the principles provided in the high
school strength and conditioning book (mobility, dynamic
stretching vs. static stretching, speed and agility with emphasis
on decelerating and accelerating properly, etc.) I would recommend
any professional working with children and adolescents (coaches,
various teachers, therapists and other childcare providers) to
become certified through the IYCA organization.

 

Give Yourself the Coaching Edge…For Just $1

Right now, you have the opportunity to give yourself the competitive
edge over every other coach in your area.

 

You have the opportunity to make your athletes better. You have the
opportunity to make your career better. You have the opportunity to
join a team of motivated, like-minded trainers and coaches that are
committed to being the best in the industry.

 

All by becoming part of IYCA Members.

 

So the question is this:

 

Are you committed to being the best coach you can possibly be?

 

If the answer is ‘Yes’ then don’t wait another second… Join IYCA
Members For Just $1 Today!

 

https://iyca.org/membership/

The Happy Youth Fitness Specialist: Part 2

Youth Fitness Specialist And Happines Part 2… 

As Elena and I pondered the sources from which happiness flowed we wondered if there was another catalyst to its fulfillment, a life of solidarity.  Whether fully engaged in a labor of love or committed to a purpose greater than yourself, can you truly be the best version of yourself, by yourself?  Without being challenged, inspired and supported by a like minded peer group, how do we ever know whether we are progressing or regressing?  Further, what is a life of pleasure without others to share, enjoy and explore it with. 

 

(more…)

How Much Should I Charge For Speed Training?

Speed Training Business Tips

Hi Brian,

 

Erik here. I am currently waiting my approval on the level 1 IYCA Speed cert. Long story short. I am in a new area and have begun to approach facilities, coaches, organizations to be the go to guy for speed training.

 

I have a meeting set up with a baseball center and they want me to put together a proposal for them immediately.

 

So my question is, in an area that is very wealthy what would be the best way to go about pricing this?

 

Per month, in blocks eg, 12, 24, 50 sessions, and basic idea of what to charge?

 

I know loaded questions, but I figured I would ask.

 

Keep up the awesome work.

 

Yours in speed,

Erik

 

(more…)

How To Shape Speed Training – Part 1

Speed Training

Many articles, books and information products discuss the development of speed from its physiological perspective of bio-motor enhancement.

 

How to get athletes stronger so as to create more force production and absorption.

 

How many sets and reps are necessary in a given training program in order to elicit the greatest possible hypertrophic response.

 

How long should the rest times be between sprints or cone drills so as to ensure maximum recoverability.

 

These are all valid considerations and the purpose of this article is not to diminish their value.

 

The pursuit of lasting speed and movement enhancement with your athletes however, should not be reduced to learning and applying just the overviews of quality programming. There is a much larger picture to consider – and it requires a more long-term approach and keen eye from a coaching perspective.

 

(more…)

3 Keys to Successful Speed Camps

 

 

Speed Camps Revenue

Before I get into the 3 Keys to successful speed camps, I wanted to tell you that after much deliberation we’ve decided to give you access the online version of the closed door Workshop that Pat Rigsby and I did on running Profitable Speed Camps & Clinics when you order the Youth Speed Specialist Certification before tomorrow at 3pm.

 

This was previously only available to people who attended the webinar this past Monday, but we’ve decided that this information is too powerful to exclude those that couldn’t attend the webinar.

 

So you can grab the Youth Speed & Agility Specialist Certification *and* online access to the Running Profitable Speed Camps & Clinics Workshop here:

 

—-> www.YouthSpeedSpecialist.com

 

In the Youth Speed & Agility Specialist Certification, Lee Taft and I give you a lot  more than just information on training athletes to be faster.

 

We also reveal our complete system for running successful and profitable Speed Camps.

 

Something we have both had tremendous success with over the years.

 

So, here are our Top 3 Keys that will help you understand how to make  your Speed Camps the most on-demand program in your area:

 

(more…)

Fitness Programs For Kids: Top 3 Keys To Speed Training

 

 

Fitness Programs For Kids

Fitness Programs For Kids speed training for young athletes
International superstar Speed Coach Lee Taft and I agree on almost everything related to training athletes.

 

Together, we have found through our combined 40 years of experience that these are the 3 most important factors to a successful speed training program –

 

 

Speed Key #1 – Create a Developmental System
Training for speed has to be developmental in nature.

 

With younger athletes (6 – 9 years old) training for speed is a matter of allowing kids to explore various aspects of movement from a self-learning perspective.

 

As a Coach or Trainer, your objective is to create games and drills that provide a broad-base of multi-directional movement (i.e. forward, backwards) as well as timing-oriented skills (i.e. skipping to a specific cadence).

 

It is important to resist the urge to ‘over-teach’ or ‘make perfect’ the way your youngsters are performing these skills.

 

Young nervous systems must be given the opportunity to learn through a trial and error process, what quality movement feels like.

 

With athletes 10 – 18, your training efforts can become much more teaching based and focus will shift to perfection of movement habits and eventually ‘drilling’ (i.e. repetitive sets of specific skills).

 

Do not be fooled into thinking that young athletes and more mature athletes can learn the skills associated with speed & agility in the same way, however.

 

A developmental system is necessary for optimal speed & agility training.

 

Our new Youth Speed & Agility Specialist Certification contains the complete developmental process that Lee and I have used successfully for nearly 4 decades.

 

—> Click here for an example of that system

 

(more…)

Youth Speed Certification – Final Chance

 

 

Youth Speed Certification Rampage

As I predicted, we literally sold out of the 50 spots within 3 hours.

 

And why wouldn’t we?

 

Two certifications.

 

Two credentials.

 

Three world-class professionals.

 

One price – only $197.

 

Our industry just doesn’t provide opportunities like this and I can’t say as though
I’m surprised that so many people jumped on the chance.

 

The response actually made me look in a different direction…

 

I called our host facility and asked them flat-out, if the venue could hold an
additional 10 people.

 

I’m excited (and a little surprised to be honest) that the answer came back as "yes".

 

So, that means I get to hold spots for 10 more people.

 

10 – and then that’s it.

 

Do you know what it means to be able to say "one of the first in the world"?

 

I’ll let you think about that while you consider if you want to click on the
link below and reserve one of the final 10 spots for the Youth Speed Certification
….

 

https://iyca.org/speed-certification/

 

 

– Brian

 

Youth Speed Certification – Only 50 Spots Available

 

 

OK…

 

Youth Speed Certification

Details first –

 

:: Saturday July 18, "Speed & Agility Certification – Level 1" taught by Lee Taft
and myself

 

:: Sunday July 19, "Youth Nutrition Certification" taught by Dr. Chris Mohr

 

:: A free 3-hour informal ‘master mind’ with me on Sunday morning

 

I really don’t think there is much else to say.

 

The link to register and secure your spot is below.

 

The emails, phone calls and Face Book messages have been coming in by
the droves.

 

Your colleagues and competitors want this information and are excited to
obtain these youth speed certification credentials.

 

And you should be, too.

 

I can’t wait to see you in July!!

 

Act quickly and decisively…

 

… Success waits for no one.

 

Here’s your exclusive link to the youth speed certification

 

https://www.iyca.org/speed-certification/

 

 

– Brian

 

 

Youth Fitness Specialist Why This is ‘Your IYCA’

How Valuable is the Youth Fitness Specialist Certification?

 “I’ve been hired by parents from towns from as far as 20 miles away, created Charity
programs with my local Boys Club, created a name for myself in Athletic Development
through my community and thankfully, due to the revenue incurred from my
accelerated skills through the IYCA, am opening my first training center in January.

This is what I’ve accomplished with my Youth Fitness Specialist certification and this
is what it will do for you”

 

That’s a testimonial Robert Belley wrote for me over 12 months ago.

 

His career has absolutely exploded.

 

When I asked Robert to explain to you a bit more about his thoughts on the IYCA
and what it means to him, he was kind enough to record a short audio for you to
listen to.

 

Click ‘Play’ on the audio player below and listen to what this man has to say:

 

 

 

 

His passion is absolutely amazing to me.

 

And he refuses to just sit back and be content with a single serving of the IYCA.

 

Robert is an ‘up the ladder’ kind of guy…

 

… And his career success is proof that this kind of mentality works.

 

Tomorrow is your final opportunity to receive our newly revised
‘Level 2 – Youth Fitness Specialist’ certification for a full $50 off.

 

I strongly suggest you consider Robert Belley when deciding if you’re ready
to start climbing the IYCA ladder.

 

Here’s your link:

 

 

Level 2 – Youth Fitness Specialist – Click Here Now

  

 ‘Till next time,

 

 

Brian

 

 

P.S. – I received an email from IYCA Member Aaron Larmore today.

 

Aaron, like Robert, was one of our first ever graduates.

 

He traveled from Iowa to Illinois in order to attend our first ever Level 1 seminar
as well.

 

He then made the trek back here for our ‘Coffee, Tea and Talk’ get together
a few weeks back.

 

He emailed to say that he was making the trip from Iowa to Indiana in order to
participate in our second ‘Coffee, Tea and Talk’ get together this coming weekend.

 

Aaron just opened his very first training center and already is FLOODED with
young athletes to train.

 

Are you seeing a trend?

 

Here’s that link again –

 

Level 2 – Youth Fitness Specialist – Click Here Now