Archive for “Alwyn Cosgrove” Tag

Youth Fitness Business: Training Adults is More Difficult?

Youth Fitness Business Comparisons

You can (and should) take a look at John’s entire article here.

 

Now, our industry is full of people who seem to enjoy taking shots at their peers. Almost like a sport, they feel somehow empowered and or compelled to lobby opinions at what other people have to say and cloak their oftentimes defaming commentary with “this isn’t personal”.

 

My ‘retort’ article is not anywhere near a ‘shot’ at John. I was just so intrigued by his thoughts and feelings on the matter, I wanted to test the merits of his conclusions based on what I know about developing young athletes.

 

And by ‘testing the merits’ I mean to decide for myself if I think his deductions are correct. Not whether he’s right – he believes he is and I respect that wholly.

 

Below are the enumerated reasons John has outlined as to why adults are more difficult to train. My thoughts are below each point in italics.

 

youth fitness business

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Alwyn Cosgrove's Secrets to Success

Each week, I post a new audio for IYCA Members.

 

I call them the ‘8-Minute Rapid Fire’.

 

The amount of information you can get out of someone in just 8-minutes is absolutely amazing… I am stunned at how much experts can reveal in this short amount of time!

 

I want you to listen to Alwyn’s interview carefully.

 

He was diagnosed with cancer twice over the past five years, beat it both times, and in the process, became one of the most successful and inspirational Fitness Professionals in the world…

 

… If this guy is not qualified to teach you about ‘Success Secrets’, I don’t know who is.

 

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Youth Speed Training Exposed

 

 

Youth Speed Training Mistakes

Everyone claims to be an ‘expert’ don’t they?

 

It’s the one title that I truly can’t stand.

 

And I say that because there are very few real experts in the industry of
fitness and sports training.

 

Gray Cook comes to mind as one of them.

 

So to does Alwyn Cosgrove, Al Vermeil and Carlo Alvarez.

 

Experts all.

 

Easy to spot on expert, too. They’re the ones who have a major track record
of success when it comes to training athletes, but are also ALWAYS on the
lookout for stuff they don’t know.

 

Lifelong learners.

 

That to me is what defines an ‘expert’.

 

The greatest expert I know in terms of youth speed training and agility training is a man that
I am 100% sure you know.

 

Lee Taft.

 

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Youth Fitness Industry Pride…

 

 

Youth Fitness Industry

So tomorrow I’m off to Providence Rhode Island.

 

For three years now, I’ve been honored to have a place on the
esteemed ‘Speakers Panel’ for Perform Better.

 

In my mind, one of the preeminent organizations in our youth fitness industry,
it has been a sincere pleasure to share the stage with such
industry icons as Juan Carlos Santana, Mike Boyle, Gray Cook,
Alwyn Cosgrove and Al Vermeil.

 

But something is very different about this years Perform Better
tour.

 

I’m still speaking at all the events.

 

Rhode Island this month.

 

Chicago next.

 

Long Beach in July.

 

But this year, I’m traveling to each of those locations one day
early in order to present a private Level 1 Youth Fitness Specialist
certification to attendees.

 

Perform Better decided a few months ago that the IYCA and its
message to the youth fitness industry, is worth that much.

 

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The Young Athletes Injury Prevention Lie

 

 

Young Athletes Programming Do Reduce Injuries

You can’t build a house on quicksand.

 

You just can’t.

 

When the base isn’t sturdy, the structure is bound to
topple.

 

And that’s the only real lesson you need to understand
when it comes to injury prevention for young athletes.

 

It’s all in building a foundation.

 

From the ground up.

 

As Trainers and Coaches, our entire obligation when
working with younger athletes (6 – 13 years old) is to
fill them with as much athletic knowledge as possible.

 

Nothing ‘sport specific’.

 

Nothing ‘position specific’.

 

Just a full and complete warehouse of information.

 

Force production and absorption.

 

Speed and agility skill.

 

Lift mechanics and positioning.

 

Teaching young athletes how to perform these critical
elements of sporting success in the undeniable key
to the becoming champions.

 

But it’s also the most important factor in preventing
injuries as well.

 

And that is one of the main issues we have wrong in
this industry.

 

True injury prevention does not come in the form of
6-week programs geared towards lessoning the risk of
certain incidents.

 

Real injury prevention occurs naturally as a secondary
result of proper developmental training.

 

It is not an isolating issue that needs to be addressed
separately.

 

Case in point, I was reviewing an ‘ACL Prevention’
program offered by a local hospital last week and saw
the curriculum they teach their young athletes during
this 6-week course:

 

a. Deceleration Techniques

b. Jumping and Landing Mechanics

c. Proper Strength Training Technique

 

Is there anything in there that shouldn’t automatically
be included in a well designed athletic development
training system?

 

What denotes this specifically as an ‘ACL Prevention’
program?

 

A good friend and colleague mine, Alwyn Cosgrove, is
found of saying, "If it isn’t injury prevention that
doesn’t that make it automatically injury promotion?"

 

Alwyn’s comment is meant to make you think.

 

All quality training programs should be based on
preventing injuries.

 

If they aren’t, than they’re promoting them – which
doesn’t seem to make any sense.

 

In the case of young athletes (6 – 13), the most
critical factor in preventing injuries is in understanding
the science and practical application of coordination
development.

 

 

Balance

 

Spatial Awareness

 

Kinesthetic Differentiation

 

Rhythm

 

Movement Adequacy

 

 

How each of these commodities apply to a training
session.

 

How to create fun and engaging drills for each of them.

 

Why they are critical for both future performance and
injury prevention.

 

And it seems to me that when it comes to working with
younger athletes, very few Coaches and Trainers truly
seem to get it.

 

ACL and other debilitating injuries that occur in the
teenage years can be prevented by applying the right
kind of exercise stimulus while athletes are still
very young.

 

Maybe worth looking at a resource that is considered
one of the greatest information products ever produced
when it comes to the training and development of young
athletes.

 

Complete Athlete Development has been field tested on
more than 15,000 young athletes worldwide and changed
the lives of countless Coaches, Trainers and Parents.

 

I’ve been coaching for 13 years now.

 

Not one major injury suffered to a single athlete
yet.

 

Could be chance.

 

Maybe I’m just lucky.

 

Or perhaps there’s some stuff about injury prevention
that you need to know better?

 

Have a look at Complete Athlete Development and find out –

 

https://www.developingathletics.com/cad-short-copy.html

 

Over 3.5 million young athletes will get injured playing sports
this year in the United States alone.

 

Tragic but largely preventable.

 

Give CAD a try –

 

https://www.developingathletics.com/cad-short-copy.html

 

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian