Archive for “Business Training” Tag

Blueprint to Building Your Ideal Youth Fitness Business Video

 

Youth Fitness Business Building Success

 

Do you wake up each day excited to go to work?

 

I’m sure you are passionate about helping your clients or athletes achieve their goals but are you doing EXACTLY what you want to be doing?

 

Well, if your answer isn’t an enthusiastic YES, then I have something special for you.

 

IYCA Expert Dave Gleason did a presentation where he shares the exact plan he used to dump an unfulfilling career as an In Home Trainer to open his dream facility and build an ultra-successful business serving the hottest market in the industry: Youth Fitness & Sports Performance.

 

http://youth-fitness-specialist.com/

 

In this Free Video you will discover the secrets to never having to work with another single client you don’t love again while building the business or career of your dreams!

 

I wish most fitness pros would enjoy what they do half as much as Dave enjoys what he does… and in this video he’s going to share exactly how he turned his passion into a thriving youth fitness business.

 

Remember why you got into this industry and start loving your career again. Here is a blueprint to how Dave made that happen for him and how you can do it too.

 

Turn your fitness passion into profits starting with this video ->

 

http://youth-fitness-specialist.com/

 

Dedicated to Your Success,

 

Pat

 

P.S. – Check out Dave Gleason’s youth fitness business presentation where he shares his story on how he went from an In Home Trainer who didn’t really enjoy what he was doing to building one of the top youth fitness businesstraining facilities in the U.S. while loving every minute of it.

 

http://youth-fitness-specialist.com/

 

 

Youth Fitness Business: Training Adults is More Difficult – Part 4

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youth fitness business

9.) Financial Justification – Most athlete programs are funded by parents or the school system or a possible sponsor. Parents can rationalize spending the dollars on a Youth Fitness Business and on their children more than themselves when it comes to physical fitness. Why? Parents view their children as “still having a chance” to achieve a dream or great feat. This brings us back to the adult client. Why doesn’t an adult view this the same way? Adults cannot justify spending the money on personal training or fitness because they face other expenses where they need to funnel their hard-earned money to. When it comes to personal health, adults try to rationalize with themselves by procrastinating, or trying to get healthier on their own. When they fail, they finally seek out a personal trainer. Certain adults are skeptical of this expense simply because they lack the confidence, commitment, and motivation needed to succeed.

 

Yup, parents will pay for their kids while sacrificing for themselves. True. But the fitness industry generates more than $100 billion every year in the United States alone – people ARE paying for service and product.

 

The youth fitness business /sport training market generates $4 billion annually in the United States (according to the Wall Street Journal). The adult ‘fat loss’ demographic generates 4x that amount. (more…)

Youth Fitness Business: Training Adults is More Difficult – Part 3

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Youth Fitness Business vs Adults Continued

Youth Fitness Business

6.) Poor Posture – Let’s face it… adults have been on this earth longer and therefore, have been battling gravity longer. With prolonged static postures at 8-10 hour jobs–combined with inactivity, the typical adult suffers from the most common postural dysfunction: upper and lower crossed syndromes.

 

True, but activity (especially competitive activity) doesn’t lessen the risk or incidence of postural dysfunction, it adds to the matrix of work a Coach must do with young athletes.

 

The one feature present in youth that makes this point even more issue-oriented is the fact that teenagers are in growth. Over-specialization and competitiveness in youth sports have made the time frame of PHV (and beyond) extraordinarily challenging from a coaching, bodily dysfunction standpoint.

 

Conservatively, 60% of the young athletes you will work with are considered ‘sport specialists’ in terms of their lack of multi-lateral development. That degree of over-patterninzation coupled with human growth factors can and does make posture, dysfunction and injury consideration an absolute nightmare at the youth level of coaching.

 

7.) Personalities – Adults are more set in their ways. They present Type A or Type B personalities which force fitness professionals to adjust their coaching style several times per day. Young athletes are typically trained in groups and THEY must adjust to the coaching style. When your 54 year old client is a vice-president of a large investment firm, do you really think he wants to be coached in a manner that invokes he is the “subordinate”? Consider this: a youngster are more coach-able.

 

Couldn’t disagree with this point more. For years, I constructed a personality profile for working with young athletes that was based on the reality of different temperament types – and is the cornerstone of the ‘Art of Coaching’ portion of the IYCA’s Youth Fitness Specialist – Level 1 course.

 

The days of having all your young athletes ‘adjust to your coaching’ are long past. The reality is that coaching young people is about education and developing skill set – that requires an involved process of altering communication styles and understanding learning sequences.

 

Combine that with the rather diffuse nature of a young person’s personality – if you’ve ever trained a 15 year athlete the day after they’ve broken up with their girlfriend or boyfriend, you know exactly what I mean.

 

The IYCA context of personality profile looks like this:

 

  • High Motivation/High Skill
  • Low Motivation/High Skill
  • High Motivation/Low Skill
  • Low Motivation/Low Skill

 

Each personality type requires an extremely different coaching method in order to ensure adequate communication and learning. Moreover, a given young athlete can (and will) change their profile daily. Learning how to work with varying personalities in the same group and managing to keep effective communication and learning moving forward well is the art of what we do.

 

8.) Orthopedic issues – Most adults will present orthopedics problems stemming from past knee surgeries, hip replacements, frozen shoulders, blah, blah, blah. This list is long. The bottom line is adults have not taken care of themselves for longer period of time than today’s youth. Their bodies are weathered. They have neglected their bodies for a longer period of time and therefore, are paying the price now. Fitness professionals need to adjust, modify, and help correct certain aspects of the kinetic chain to make the exercise program enjoyable, pain-free, and effective.

 

My points from #6 stand so no need to re-hash. I will add however, that 99% of young athletes who come to you have had incredibly poor weight room experiences in the past (and may even continue that trend while in your care). Orthopedic issues abound with every young athlete I have ever worked with and although John’s point of adults being in disrepair longer than kids is reasonable, the alternative side of that argument is, yes… but kids are experiencing loads and improper movement patterns that make orthopedic concerns ongoing and ever changing.

 

Become a Youth Fitness Specialist Today —> http://iyca.org/fitspecialist1/

And start your own path to a youth fitness business

 

– Brian

 

 

Youth Fitness Business: Training Adults is More Difficult – Part 2

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More Reasons why choose a Youth Fitness business

 

youth fitness business

2.) Sedentary Lifestyle – Most adults that work are inactive due to desk jobs, laziness, or boredom. Unlike youngsters involved in scholastic sports, there is no structure involving financial accountability and job performance. Youth athletes benefit from a different kind of structure. They follow a routine consisting of academia, social thrivers, and sport. So if the expectation is not there, don’t expect adults to get off their couch to do something unless that are forced to.

 

I think I’d be splitting hairs to disagree with this point outright, but it should be noted that most teenagers also sit in desks some 5 – 6 hours per day and compound that issue with homework and TV/video game play in the evening. Professionals who don’t work with young people regularly may be quite surprised to find out how sedentary many young athletes truly are outside of their competitive season.

 

Having said that, I absolutely understand John’s point about sedentary lifestyles and expectations, but to a degree that point could be flipped by suggesting that adults have more incentive to ‘get fit’ due to their advancing age and sense of mortality. I’ve never met a teenager who felt concerned about their health with respect to inactivity – kids, by in large, feel themselves to be ‘bulletproof’ which can make for creating an incentive to become active very difficult.

 

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Youth Fitness Business: Training Adults is More Difficult?

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Youth Fitness Business Comparisons

You can (and should) take a look at John’s entire article here.

 

Now, our industry is full of people who seem to enjoy taking shots at their peers. Almost like a sport, they feel somehow empowered and or compelled to lobby opinions at what other people have to say and cloak their oftentimes defaming commentary with “this isn’t personal”.

 

My ‘retort’ article is not anywhere near a ‘shot’ at John. I was just so intrigued by his thoughts and feelings on the matter, I wanted to test the merits of his conclusions based on what I know about developing young athletes.

 

And by ‘testing the merits’ I mean to decide for myself if I think his deductions are correct. Not whether he’s right – he believes he is and I respect that wholly.

 

Below are the enumerated reasons John has outlined as to why adults are more difficult to train. My thoughts are below each point in italics.

 

youth fitness business

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Youth Fitness Business Insider [audio]

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youth fitness business

I start this 60-minute audio interview with the business genius Pat Rigsby by saying:

 

“You’re not going to get this information out of any books and you won’t hear this any other place”

 

This is one of the key elements to how Pat and myself have both built successful Youth Fitness business and Sport Training businesses.

 

LISTEN BELOW, RIGHT NOW: