Archive for “Soccer Player” Tag

Alternative Methods for Training Explosive Strength To High School Athletes

 

 

High School Athletes Strength Training

 

 

high school athletes

By Wil Fleming

Nearly all high school athletes, with very few exceptions, need to
develop explosive strength.

 

 

The instances in which the skill of explosive strength are used in
sports are endless, but when used “explosiveness” is very apparent.

 

A linemen firing off from their stance.

 

A soccer player rising above his opponents to head a ball toward goal.

 

A volleyball player making a quick lateral move to reach for the dig.

 

Instances of explosive strength are very vivid when used and typically are a part of a game changing play.

 

Typically I would now talk about the importance of Olympic lifts, but in some instances using a barbell is not possible due to equipment limitations or even the readiness of the athlete. In those instances, the need for High School Athletes does not diminish, but the need for creativity does increase.

 

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#1 Common Question From Parents of Young Athletes

Young Athletes and secrets to success

young athletes

Do you do ‘Sport-Specific’ Training”?

 

Well, let me give you the cold hard facts… It doesn’t exist. Especially not with young athletes.

 

When working with preadolescent and high school athletes, the undeniable reality is that we are tending to an organism that is in the process of growth.  And that fact is something that we cannot do anything about, nor cause disruption to the process of.

 

What a growing and maturing body needs in order to remain injury-free and develop optimal athletic skill is variety. With respect to training, this amounts to NOT having a hyper-focus on making a young athlete a better football player by only doing exercises in the gym that the NFL players would do.

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Top 3 Speed & Agility With Young Athletes Mistakes – Part 2

Speed & Agility With Young Athletes

It is very standard for Coaches and Training Facilities to both expect and ‘sell’ parents on the fact that the young athletes in their care will become decidedly better in only 6 or 8 weeks’ worth of training.

 

And in fact, they’re correct in saying so.

 

But not because their training system is somehow superior or because they possess unique talents as a Coach, quite simply, it’s because human beings are adaptive machines that alter (become better) under the strain of applied demand (training).

 

This is especially true for young people in the age bracket of 6 – 18.  This time of life represents a literal coming of age with respect to maturation and athletic ability.  The Central Nervous System is learning to master the art of movement, bones are growing more dense and muscles are becoming naturally longer and more powerful.

 

You could, quite literally, ask a 15 year old soccer player to run stairs 3 times per week for 6 weeks and show improvements to both their speed and power output capacity.  That doesn’t mean running stairs is an efficient training style, it just means that the human body is designed to accommodate the stress it is placed under by getting faster and stronger.

 

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ACL Injuries and Young Athletes

 

 

Young Athletes Commn Injury

Sooner or later you’re going to get hurt. That’s what happens when athletes train hard and play intensely. But thanks to professionals like Erin Perry, young athletes are returning to action better and faster than ever before. Not to mention, her tips in this article will help you avoid injuries before they happen.

 

Erin is a sought-after athletic therapist in Toronto, Canada, specializing in pediatric elite athletes. She has worked with the women’s national soccer teams for 8 years, as well as the national gymnastics team, and regional teams including hockey, rugby, soccer, swimming, basketball, and volleyball to name a few. Erin also runs Developing Athletics Canada and the EOS Performance Institute.

 

Brian: Erin, can you tell us about the young athletes you typically work with and how you got into athletic therapy?

 

Erin Perry: As a young person, I was athletic, I enjoyed soccer, swimming, rowing, and skiing. I experienced some injuries, but it was the concussions that caused me to ‘hang ’em up’. I figured then and there that if I couldn’t be an athlete, that I would work hard to take care of other athletes in helping them realizing their dreams. Now I specialize in pediatric elite athletes both in clinic and field situations. Their development, training and treatment are my focus. So many injuries that I treat are preventable.

 

Brian: One of the most common injuries in female athletes is a torn ACL. What are your experiences in treating this injury and your thoughts on injury prevention?

 

EP: I am so happy that you asked. Most ACL injuries are what we call non-traumatic, which simply means that it is an injury that no contact was made in. For example, a soccer player running down the line with the ball, works to move the ball inside, and suddenly falls down while hearing a pop; an ACL tear. These are all preventable! The number one cause of these types of injuries is tight hamstrings. The three hamstrings should be stretched separately, and when tested in a straight leg raise, attention must be made that the findings are made with the pelvis remaining stationary. As soon as the pelvis rotates posteriorly, the test is negated. Most females have good straight leg raise range of motion, but have poor hamstring flexibility. The difference here is crucial. Normal is 80-90degrees. Please be tested, do the tests, and tell all of your friends and teammates, so that we decrease the incidence of ACLs! The other preventable cause is a muscle imbalance between the quadriceps and hamstrings. I will say that this is crucial, that the three hamstrings need to be strengthened again individually. Closed kinetic chain strengthening should be done all of the time, unless it is a rehab program.

 

Brian: Is the ACL injury common among all sports?

 

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Young Athletes And Injuries

I had an absolutely amazing meeting yesterday about Young Athletes.

 

It was with Scott Hopson – the international Director of

Education for Power Plate.

 

Known widely as ‘vibration training’, Scott wanted to get

together with me in order to discuss the potential of using

vibration training with young athletes.

 

Now, I have only known Scott for a few months, but already

understood him to be an exceptionally intelligent man and

someone who I respect a great deal.

 

Having said that – I had my reservations about the meeting.

 

I am a traditionalist to the core when it comes to creating

training programs and developmental strategies for young

athletes, and I really wasn’t terribly convinced that

vibration training would have much of a place in my system.

 

Boy was I wrong!

 

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not about to change directions with

my career or add a new component to my training systems,

but my meeting with Scott taught me a lot about something in

particular….

 

…. I have been right for a long time.

 

We talked about nervous system fatigue and its impact on

progressing a young athletes’ ability.

 

We discussed the importance of creating proper habitual

patterns of movement and the role that has sporting success.

We shared our views on over-training parameters and the effect that can have on young athletes injury potential.

Scott offered his perspective and I offered mine.

 

And we were in full agreement with each other.

 

In fact, the conversation drew me back to an experience I

had earlier that day with one of my Young Athletes.

 

Britney is a 14 year old soccer player who is currently

attending my summer development camp.

 

And yesterday morning, she came looking tired, pale and

extremely low energy.

 

After chatting with her and her Mom about what was the

matter, I found out that for the past few nights, Britney

had been trying out for a new soccer team and that each of

the 2-hour practices had involved nothing more than wind

sprints and various forms of ‘agility’ training.

 

Her new Coach, it seems, considers this time of year to be

the ‘pre-season’ and so was working at increasing the level

of his athlete’s ‘mental toughness’ and ‘conditioning’.

 

And this is the kind of crap that goes on day-in and day-out

worldwide with respect to young athletes and sport.

 

Coaches who don’t know.

 

Trainers who don’t get it.

 

And the troubling part is that it really is a simple equation.

 

Any sort of training stimulus sends the body into a

state of catabolism (a breaking down phase).

 

If the training was not too tough and in accordance with

proper recovery strategies (sleep, nutrition etc) the body

will ‘bounce’ from this catabolic state and become anabolic

(a building up phase).

 

But the primary factor necessary for this to happen is the

‘toughness’ of the training.

 

And I’ve got to tell you, we absolutely stink at this particular point.

 

We make things hard all the time for our young athletes and

truly believe that if they aren’t sweating or near

exhaustion, the training session just wasn’t worth the time.

 

Nothing and I am nothing could be farther from the truth.

 

That’s not to say you don’t train your Young Athletes hard

from time to time or create enough bodily stress in order

to create an adaptation – you certainly do.

 

But it’s the mindless attention we pay to the ‘hard’

component of our training programs that need a serious

second look.

 

On this topic specifically, here’s what you’re going to

learn in Complete Athlete Development:

 

1) Why training sessions that last more than 50 minutes are

a bad idea for teenage athletes.

 

2) How to create a training system that keeps your young

athletes getting faster, stronger and more flexible without

the risk of over-training them.

 

3) How to design speed and strength programs that are

exactly what young athletes need – in the right doses and

using the correct form.

 

You know, many Trainers want to earn a living working with

young athletes.

 

Several Coaches want to know what’s best so they can create

championship teams.

 

Most Parents will shell out thousands on dollars in order

to ensure the sporting success of their children.

 

And yet just over $200 for a complete system that shows you

all of that is considered ‘not worth it’ by some.

 

Honestly, I don’t think I understand that.

 

Give Complete Athlete Development a try for a risk-free

365 days and see the power of what you don’t know –

 

http://www.developingathletics.com/cad-short-copy.html

 

Because what you don’t know is destroying our young athletes.

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian