Archive for “Fatigue” Tag

When Do You Train Young Athletes?

 

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Train Young Athletes Correctly

From a study published in the Swimming Science Bulletin. Authored by Brent S. Rushall & John Marsden:

 

"All sports require high degree of skill for superior performance. The major emphasis of a (youth athletic) training program should be skill excellence. For skills to be developed, learning should occur in non-fatigued states… It is advisable to schedule auxiliary training sessions either after a (sport) session or at some time that allows complete recovery from its execution so that no residual fatigue is carried over".

 

I’ve never mentioned this in literature, but have advocated it several times through lectures and seminars. Learning how to create appropriate training sessions is crucial to working with young athletes. If you are forced to have the technical practice AND the training session within the same day (as is typical), make sure that the training session comes AFTER practice. This keeps the body and CNS rested and for skill acquisition and demonstration during practice.

 

Ever notice that the "science" of strength, conditioning and fitness is more
complex than many realize?

 

Train Young Athletes

It’s really got nothing to do with just throwing some exercises together and
counting sets and reps.

 

Does speed training come before or after strength training?

 

When is it best to train the "core"?

 

Where does flexibility training fit into the daily picture?

 

Getting the most from your young athletes and truly making them the very
best they possibly can be means knowing as much as you can about how
to train them properly.

 

It’s not a day-by-day concept or fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants situation.

 

It requires a system.

 

A complete and comprehensive system that is internationally proven to be
successful and can be implemented by you TOMORROW with ease.

 

A system just like this one…

 

strength training for young athletes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IYCA Tip of the Week

 

Young Athletes and speed training

Maybe this is something you don’t need to hear.

 

But then again, maybe it’s something you really need to hear.

 

I say that because we all ‘seem’ to know it, but then whenever I
have a conversation with a Coach or Trainer about the topic,
I see the same mistakes being made over and over again.

 

So here it is bluntly –

 

Speed Training should not produce fatigue in your young athletes.

 

Again, it’s a ‘fact’ that every Coach and Trainer seems to
understand from a theoretical perspective, but seldom implements
properly in a practical setting.

 

Your work-rest ratios when programming for speed must be set
in such a way that your young athletes are fully recovered before
the next set commences.

 

Anything less than complete recovery means that CNS is not
firing with optimal capacity and you are, in fact, training lactic
acid threshold instead.

 

There are two ways to ensure that your young athletes are
recovered well between sets:

 

1) Make the ‘work’ portion of your speed training days low volume.
Rather than running 100 or 200 meters, work at acceleration in
10 and 20 meter bursts. That limited work output will require a
much smaller window of recovery.

 

2) Script a work-rest relationship of roughly 1:3 in terms of time.
Recovery is largely dependent on the condition of your young
athletes but is also very individually specific. Be wary of this
individual specification and be sure to ‘watch’ your athletes in
between sets for signs of full recovery.

 

 

Have a wonderful weekend!

 

 

PS Want to learn more about proven strength and speed training with young athletes
systems for young athletes?

 

http://completeathletedevelopment.com

 

 

Young Athletes And Injuries

I had an absolutely amazing meeting yesterday about Young Athletes.

 

It was with Scott Hopson – the international Director of

Education for Power Plate.

 

Known widely as ‘vibration training’, Scott wanted to get

together with me in order to discuss the potential of using

vibration training with young athletes.

 

Now, I have only known Scott for a few months, but already

understood him to be an exceptionally intelligent man and

someone who I respect a great deal.

 

Having said that – I had my reservations about the meeting.

 

I am a traditionalist to the core when it comes to creating

training programs and developmental strategies for young

athletes, and I really wasn’t terribly convinced that

vibration training would have much of a place in my system.

 

Boy was I wrong!

 

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not about to change directions with

my career or add a new component to my training systems,

but my meeting with Scott taught me a lot about something in

particular….

 

…. I have been right for a long time.

 

We talked about nervous system fatigue and its impact on

progressing a young athletes’ ability.

 

We discussed the importance of creating proper habitual

patterns of movement and the role that has sporting success.

We shared our views on over-training parameters and the effect that can have on young athletes injury potential.

Scott offered his perspective and I offered mine.

 

And we were in full agreement with each other.

 

In fact, the conversation drew me back to an experience I

had earlier that day with one of my Young Athletes.

 

Britney is a 14 year old soccer player who is currently

attending my summer development camp.

 

And yesterday morning, she came looking tired, pale and

extremely low energy.

 

After chatting with her and her Mom about what was the

matter, I found out that for the past few nights, Britney

had been trying out for a new soccer team and that each of

the 2-hour practices had involved nothing more than wind

sprints and various forms of ‘agility’ training.

 

Her new Coach, it seems, considers this time of year to be

the ‘pre-season’ and so was working at increasing the level

of his athlete’s ‘mental toughness’ and ‘conditioning’.

 

And this is the kind of crap that goes on day-in and day-out

worldwide with respect to young athletes and sport.

 

Coaches who don’t know.

 

Trainers who don’t get it.

 

And the troubling part is that it really is a simple equation.

 

Any sort of training stimulus sends the body into a

state of catabolism (a breaking down phase).

 

If the training was not too tough and in accordance with

proper recovery strategies (sleep, nutrition etc) the body

will ‘bounce’ from this catabolic state and become anabolic

(a building up phase).

 

But the primary factor necessary for this to happen is the

‘toughness’ of the training.

 

And I’ve got to tell you, we absolutely stink at this particular point.

 

We make things hard all the time for our young athletes and

truly believe that if they aren’t sweating or near

exhaustion, the training session just wasn’t worth the time.

 

Nothing and I am nothing could be farther from the truth.

 

That’s not to say you don’t train your Young Athletes hard

from time to time or create enough bodily stress in order

to create an adaptation – you certainly do.

 

But it’s the mindless attention we pay to the ‘hard’

component of our training programs that need a serious

second look.

 

On this topic specifically, here’s what you’re going to

learn in Complete Athlete Development:

 

1) Why training sessions that last more than 50 minutes are

a bad idea for teenage athletes.

 

2) How to create a training system that keeps your young

athletes getting faster, stronger and more flexible without

the risk of over-training them.

 

3) How to design speed and strength programs that are

exactly what young athletes need – in the right doses and

using the correct form.

 

You know, many Trainers want to earn a living working with

young athletes.

 

Several Coaches want to know what’s best so they can create

championship teams.

 

Most Parents will shell out thousands on dollars in order

to ensure the sporting success of their children.

 

And yet just over $200 for a complete system that shows you

all of that is considered ‘not worth it’ by some.

 

Honestly, I don’t think I understand that.

 

Give Complete Athlete Development a try for a risk-free

365 days and see the power of what you don’t know –

 

http://www.developingathletics.com/cad-short-copy.html

 

Because what you don’t know is destroying our young athletes.

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian

 

IYCA – Loving Every Second of it

The Growth of The IYCA

So I make the drive from my home in Schaumburg to Northbrook – about 20 minutes or so.

 

I’m meeting with two editors from Men’s Health to discuss a book deal as well as chat with a local school district about bringing our Fit Schools project to their respective PE programs.

 

Now, although I’ve talked on the phone with my two Men’s Health colleagues dozens of times, I’ve never met them face-to-face and certainly have no idea what they looked like.

 

When I stopped at a grocery store just before my meeting was about to start (I needed to pick up an apple…. I was starving!) I wasn’t taken back when a gentleman walked up to me and said “are you Brian?”.

 

“Yes” I answered, figuring I was meeting one of my Men’s Health partners for the first time.

 

“Nice to meet you, I’m Andrew. I’m a member of the IYCA“.

 

It took me a second to realize that ‘Andrew’ had nothing to do with Men’s Health.

 

“Wow” was about all I could muster…. I had never been ‘recognized’ in a grocery store before.

 

“Thanks for being involved” I finally managed to say. “Are you enjoying everything so far?”

 

“I’m loving it!” Andrew replied.

 

I was almost speechless.

 

That may sound odd to you.

 

I mean, I’m used to being ‘recognized’ at conferences.

 

I’m used to people chatting with me after I make a presentation.

 

But I have never been recognized in a random public setting like this before and was truly thrown off.

 

Andrew and I chatted briefly and then I was on my way.

 

But the incident has stayed with me all day long.

 

And as my fatigue has grown, the chance meeting with Andrew at 8:30 this morning has managed to ward off the usual ‘cloudy head syndrome’ I tend to get when I’ve been working this many hours.

 

I suppose it just feels good.

 

Feels good to know that I have created the IYCA and something of substance.

 

I’m used to taking shots.

 

People love to bash those of us who decide to stand for something and make that something known.

 

Heck, even a former employee of mine, someone I gave a job to and mentored for a year (who by the way is a member of the IYCA) has taken to making negative comments about me and the IYCA on his own personal blog.

 

That kind of stuff never bothers me.

 

It goes with the territory and I couldn’t care less.

 

But the reason I couldn’t care less is because of folks like Andrew and the rest of the IYCA members worldwide.

 

I receive emails, hand written letters and phone calls daily from people just wanting to express there thanks and appreciation to me for starting this movement.

 

And today, I got to experience my first ‘public recognition’ – I’ve been on cloud nine ever since.

 

In short, I suppose the easiest way for me to wrap this up is to offer these words….

 

Thank you.

 

More than you know, I appreciate every single phone call, email and letter.

 

The fact you would take the time to write to me, dial my number or stop me in a grocery store just to say “hi” means more than I could possibly express in words.

 

In your service…. It’s been more than an honor and a pleasure,

 

 

Brian

 

 

P.S. – During the meeting with that local school district I mentioned, one of the PE teachers had this to say to me after listening to my impassioned speech about how the IYCA is working to curb youth obesity nationwide –

 

“It is so nice and refreshing to see an organization actually doing something about this rather than talking about it”

 

I was at that meeting and got to hear those words firsthand.

 

But you were there with me.

 

That ‘organization’ this PE teacher was referring to has as much to do with you as it does with me.

 

Take a moment to be proud about that today.