Archive for “Toronto Canada” Tag

Train a Group of Young Kids With Different Abilities

Is it really possible to effectively train a group of young kids with varying levels of

ability at the same time?

 

What if some of them were highly skilled in movement aptitude while others (in the same group) had Autism?

 

Watch this fascinating ‘practical’ video from 2010 IYCA Trainer of the Year, Dave Gleason, and see for yourself:

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Youth Coaching Tributes 2010

Youth Coaching

Dan Parsons had the greatest impact on my Youth Coaching career.

 

Bar none.

 

Of all the wonderful Coaches I have had the sincere pleasure
of meeting and working with over the years, he, by far and
away, is the one that stands out to me.

 

I was 22.

 

Young and very ambitious.

 

Dan was a seasoned veteran and had worked with literally
hundreds of young athletes through his career.

 

And wow… what a role model he became to me.

 

He taught me about the scientific concepts of long-term
athlete development.

 

He showed me how to communicate with young athletes of
varying personalities and skill levels.

 

He explained to me the ART behind the SCIENCE of strength
and conditioning.

 

He put me in difficult youth coaching situations, gave me just enough
rope to hang myself and then demonstrated how to do it
right.

 

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ACL Injuries and Young Athletes

 

 

Young Athletes Commn Injury

Sooner or later you’re going to get hurt. That’s what happens when athletes train hard and play intensely. But thanks to professionals like Erin Perry, young athletes are returning to action better and faster than ever before. Not to mention, her tips in this article will help you avoid injuries before they happen.

 

Erin is a sought-after athletic therapist in Toronto, Canada, specializing in pediatric elite athletes. She has worked with the women’s national soccer teams for 8 years, as well as the national gymnastics team, and regional teams including hockey, rugby, soccer, swimming, basketball, and volleyball to name a few. Erin also runs Developing Athletics Canada and the EOS Performance Institute.

 

Brian: Erin, can you tell us about the young athletes you typically work with and how you got into athletic therapy?

 

Erin Perry: As a young person, I was athletic, I enjoyed soccer, swimming, rowing, and skiing. I experienced some injuries, but it was the concussions that caused me to ‘hang ’em up’. I figured then and there that if I couldn’t be an athlete, that I would work hard to take care of other athletes in helping them realizing their dreams. Now I specialize in pediatric elite athletes both in clinic and field situations. Their development, training and treatment are my focus. So many injuries that I treat are preventable.

 

Brian: One of the most common injuries in female athletes is a torn ACL. What are your experiences in treating this injury and your thoughts on injury prevention?

 

EP: I am so happy that you asked. Most ACL injuries are what we call non-traumatic, which simply means that it is an injury that no contact was made in. For example, a soccer player running down the line with the ball, works to move the ball inside, and suddenly falls down while hearing a pop; an ACL tear. These are all preventable! The number one cause of these types of injuries is tight hamstrings. The three hamstrings should be stretched separately, and when tested in a straight leg raise, attention must be made that the findings are made with the pelvis remaining stationary. As soon as the pelvis rotates posteriorly, the test is negated. Most females have good straight leg raise range of motion, but have poor hamstring flexibility. The difference here is crucial. Normal is 80-90degrees. Please be tested, do the tests, and tell all of your friends and teammates, so that we decrease the incidence of ACLs! The other preventable cause is a muscle imbalance between the quadriceps and hamstrings. I will say that this is crucial, that the three hamstrings need to be strengthened again individually. Closed kinetic chain strengthening should be done all of the time, unless it is a rehab program.

 

Brian: Is the ACL injury common among all sports?

 

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IYCA wants to provide

Is the IYCA doing what you need?

Every single day of every single week, I receive emails from all over the world.

And it’s the most amazing thing I have ever experienced.

I mean, I was raised in Toronto, Canada by a little redheaded Irish Mom with a big temper (who I love dearly) and a crusty Italian Dad with the best "don’t screw with me" stare you have ever seen (who I rank as one of the greatest human beings on the planet).

I had two older brothers who took turns beating me up, and a dog named Tiger (named affectionately after me – my nickname when I was very young was Tiger apparently due to some kind of rambunctious energy I possessed… a fact I summarily deny by the way).

My point is that I was raised by common folks and in a common way.

I never had any sort of inkling when I was young, that I would grow up to become someone that every single parent, coach and trainer in the youth sports world would know and come to trust.

But that is exactly what has happened.

And my "inbox" counter is proof of that fact.

Every single morning, there are no fewer than 50 – 200 emails waiting for me.

50 – 200 emails multiplied by 365 days…

… You do the math!

More often than not, the emails are a simple message of ‘thanks’ from grateful Moms, Dads, coaches and trainers, all of whom want to send their regards for the information I offered them in my last week’s newsletter.

Other times, the emails are long and excited rambles from folks who just purchased one of our training products and are beside themselves at how much they learned about how to make their young athletes faster, stronger or better overall athletes.

In both cases, I get tickled pink!

I say all that because my strongest desire is to see that all young athletes are trained and cared for in the best way possible – so that they can both maximize their performance and remain safe and healthy in the process.

And that’s why I sit at my computer every morning and blush.

Because so many people, all over the world, decide to take the time to tell me exactly what my information has meant to them.

If you are one of the people who have written me a message of thanks, let me take this opportunity to reciprocate by thanking you for doing so.

It meant the world to me.

If you haven’t yet emailed me your thoughts, maybe you wouldn’t mind doing so now.

I want to make sure that all the information we provide you is actually working to making your life easier.

So tell me what you think.

Good or bad.

Are we giving you what you need, or do you need something else?

I want to know… and I want you to tell me.

Scroll down and let me know….

….

Is the IYCA doing what you need?