Archive for “Personal Training” Tag

A Youth Fitness Success Story – Part 1

Not only is Dave Gleason the current IYCA Trainer of the Year, he was also the very first Athletic Revolution franchisee.

 

Dave is in the process of writing a chronicle that explains how he and I met.

 

How he was highly successful and owned an extremely profitable Personal Training business.

 

But how the day he heard me make a presentation at a Fitness Conference in 2008 changed his life and business around completely.

 

How he risked everything… And won.

 

Read this carefully:

 

 

My 17-Year, Incredibly Successful and Profitable Career in the Fitness & Sports Training Industry Took a 180 Degree Turn 2 Years Ago… But My Personal Fulfillment, Bank Account & Future Have Never Been More Glorious…

 

"I was already making great money," I kept thinking to myself.

 

My schedule was set and my credibility in the marketplace completely secure.

 

It wasn’t always like that; I scratched, clawed and stressed for years before I finally hit it big and carved out the career I had always wanted.

 

But Brian was talking about more than just establishing a career.

 

He was talking about leaving a legacy.

 

Empowering a generation.

 

Becoming a difference maker in the lives of young people.

 

Shaping the future.

 

And that’s where the tug-of-war between my common sense intelligence and ‘what it’ emotions started their battle.

 

"Working with energetic and eager young people everyday," I thought.  My eyes now riveted to the stage.

 

Changing the fortunes and lives of kids who were overweight.  Guiding them from a place of isolation and depression into the endless world of opportunity.

 

Helping young athletes excel.  Improve their game.  Remain injury free.  Obtain an elusive college scholarship.

 

My emotions started to win and I knew, at very least, that a conversation with Brian was necessary.

 

Looking back, I think I was actually hoping that this conversation would snap me back to my senses

 

 

That’s pretty compelling stuff, isn’t it?

 

Where until you see where Dave’s story concludes!

 

I’ll email you that tomorrow.

 

In the meantime, why not click on the link below and inquire about owning your very own Athletic Revolution?

 

Between now and December 31, you could qualify for 100% financing – which means NO MONEY DOWN!

 

Click on the link below and schedule a call with me… It costs nothing to ask questions….

 

… But it could cost you THOUSANDS not to take advantage of incredible offers like this one.

 

Here’s that link:

 

 

—–> https://www.myathleticrevolution.com/free-report/

 

 

Check back tomorrow for ‘Part 2’.

 

Brian

 

Youth Fitness Business: Training Adults is More Difficult – Part 4

youth fitness business

9.) Financial Justification – Most athlete programs are funded by parents or the school system or a possible sponsor. Parents can rationalize spending the dollars on a Youth Fitness Business and on their children more than themselves when it comes to physical fitness. Why? Parents view their children as “still having a chance” to achieve a dream or great feat. This brings us back to the adult client. Why doesn’t an adult view this the same way? Adults cannot justify spending the money on personal training or fitness because they face other expenses where they need to funnel their hard-earned money to. When it comes to personal health, adults try to rationalize with themselves by procrastinating, or trying to get healthier on their own. When they fail, they finally seek out a personal trainer. Certain adults are skeptical of this expense simply because they lack the confidence, commitment, and motivation needed to succeed.

 

Yup, parents will pay for their kids while sacrificing for themselves. True. But the fitness industry generates more than $100 billion every year in the United States alone – people ARE paying for service and product.

 

The youth fitness business /sport training market generates $4 billion annually in the United States (according to the Wall Street Journal). The adult ‘fat loss’ demographic generates 4x that amount. (more…)

A Lesson on Youth Sports Injuries

Youth Sports Injuries Can Be Avoided

Jim Ochse is an athletic trainer and strength and conditioning coach at DeSales University in Center Valley, Pa. He serves as athletic trainer for the women’s Volleyball, men’s and women’s cross-country, women’s tennis, and baseball.

During the summer, Jim presents SAQ camps for athletes from 10-18 years of age in northeastern PA.

IYCA: What’s your background in youth sports and athletics? Have you worked with young athletes?

JO: I started out as a Health and Physical Education teacher for K- 6 for several years, but was disenchanted in how physical fitness was instituted in the educational system. I then became certified as an athletic trainer and have covered all aspects of youth sports for the past 22 years. I serve as a volunteer coach for soccer, basketball, and baseball for my local youth association. During the regular school year from September to May, my main responsibility is to the college athletes at DeSales University in Pennsylvania ; however, I do talks and clinics whenever possible to youth, and have a few personal training clients that I collaborate with. During the summer months I direct a number of Speed, Agility, and Quickness camps in my local area for youth from ages 10-18. I also do one day seminars on running, and other topics such as how to incorporate stability ball training to their strength programs.

IYCA: There are a lot of coaches, parents, and even trainers who treat young athletes as if they were "little adults." What I mean by that is they will take the training routine of a superstar athlete and use it as a guide when working with youngsters. Why, if at all, should we warn them against that kind of training?

JO: I see this mentality used by both parents and youth coaches, and obviously, this type of mentality is not appropriate for developing athletes. A training routine for youth should be individualized for that particular athlete. A young athlete is not mature enough physically, psychologically, or emotionally to even perform the same type of training as an adult. They do not have the base of aerobic/anaerobic conditioning that a more mature athlete has acquired, nor should they attempt a strength program that is meant or written for an adult. With their growth plate still immature, performing strength exercises for mature athletes may predispose them to unnecessary injuries. Weight training does have its place among young athletes; however, emphasis should be place on light weights, proper form and techniques, an implemented by a well qualified coach or personal trainer.

IYCA: The age old debate is "How old should an athlete be before beginning to lift weights." What’s your view on that controversial topic?

JO: I go along with the NSCA position on weight lifting. I believe that children can even be taught Olympic type weight lifting techniques, but not use extremely heavy weights. In fact, most of my teaching at this level is with either a broomstick or at most a light barbell. I even have my 8-year daughter lifting light dumbbells, and even perform modified pushups on a Swiss Ball, and performing abs curls. Physiologically youth athletes physiologically are not capable of withstanding great weights, due to their anatomical structure and rate of maturity. I use a lot of body weight exercises such as squats, lunges, and step ups. I use upper body exercises such as push-ups, chin-ups, and resistance bands, in place of weights. I want to make sure that the young athletes have the proper techniques down. When they are older, they can worry about increasing their resistance training.

IYCA: Using your ideals, could you define "functional conditioning" for us?

(more…)

The Biggest Problem in Youth Sports Training?

 

 

Youth Sports Training Mistakes

The most common problem facing Trainers & Coaches today with respect to developing young athletes over time is the ability to plan long-term. The personal training and coaching professions are most typically based on a session-to-session consideration – clients pay per session most often and Trainers create training programs one session at a time. The same is true for coaching sport – most Coaches script out one practice plan at a time, rather than create a relative flow for an entire month or even season.

 

Limited Plan… Limited Gain

 

The problem with this industry standard as it relates to youths and adolescents is that this type of shortsightedness serves to limit the potential gains made by a young athlete. It is not unlike running a business or corporation – when business owners take the time to organize their objectives and action steps for a given month or year, they almost always are successful at implementing the plan. Far too many business owners, Trainers and Coaches feel as though their actions during a sales drive, training session or practice is what will lead to positive change, when in fact it is the planning that occurs before these actions that accounts for the true gains

 

Become and Objective Monster

 

No one can learn how to create 6 or 12 month Youth Sports Training plans in a day.

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It takes time and diligent effort to acquire this skill, but your ability to get better over time will have a direct and positive impact on both your young athletes’ success rate as well as your businesses ability to attract new clients. Set an objective for yourself to create a system or plan that allows you to develop long-term and wide-focused agendas for your young athletes. Take several days or weeks if need be to create a system that is streamlined and easy to implement – although your are looking for a comprehensive system, the more basic you make it, the more easy it will be to adhere to.

 

Action Steps

 

Start simply. Take a piece of paper and write out where you want your young athletes to be in 4 weeks. Create headings and then just fill in each category. For instance, what skill sets are you working on now? To what degree of competency do you want an athlete or team to be able to demonstrate that skill set in 1 month’s time? This can also be applied to elite adolescent athletes. Are you working on squat or power clean totals right now? If so, where do you want these numbers to be in 4 weeks?

 

(more…)

Youth Fitness Specialist From The IYCA

 

 

Become a Youth Fitness Specialist

 

A 3-tiered Youth Fitness Specialist system that is guaranteed to boost your career
forever and completely recession-proof your business.

 

 

 

Here’s your direct link-

 

Become a Youth Fitness Specialist Today

 

We are facing some very difficult and scary economic times.

 

But your career doesn’t have to be effected at all if you plan wisely.

 

The youth market of the industry continues to surge with record-breaking
revenues being seen throughout the world.

 

I want you to quickly read IYCA Member, David Gleason’s story –

 

"From a pure financial perspective the IYCA has been an incredible catalyst
for my career. Supporting a wife and two kids with a single income (me)
these days is not an easy task no matter what the industry. With the economic
environment such as it is, my personal training business has taken a
substantial hit even though I work with in a fairly affluent area. With the
knowledge and insight I have gained from the YFS Level 1 certification,
IYCA continuing ed, and the IYCA members website – my business is
growing at a mind boggling pace.

 

To be completely transparent… I lost 9 sessions per week at $80 per
session. Simply, $2880 per month. Before I even had time to hit the
panic button I found out I passed my Level 1 exam and started my first
class for 6-9 year olds. I quickly surpassed that mark with just two
classes per week and I am now being requested for other age groups
and by organizations like the local PTO, Education Foundation, and
even pre-schools as well as moms and dads I have never met"

 

 

This is the kind of "beat the economy" story I see all the time
throughout Membership in the IYCA.

 

(more…)

Programming for Youth

The Youth Sports Mentality:

Without a Plan, You Will Be Mediocre at Best

 

The most common problem facing Trainers & Coaches today with
respect to developing young athletes over time is the ability to plan
long-term.  The personal training and coaching professions are most
typically based on a session-to-session consideration – clients pay per

session most often and Trainers create training programs one session

at a time. 

 

The same is true for coaching sport – most Coaches script
out one practice plan at a time, rather than create a relative flow
for an entire month or even season.

 

 

Limited Plan…  Limited Gain

 

The problem with this industry standard as it relates to youths and
adolescents is that this type of shortsightedness serves to limit the
potential gains made by a young athlete.  It is not unlike running a
business or corporation – when business owners take the time to
organize their objectives and action steps for a given month or year,

they almost always are successful at implementing the plan. 

 

Far too many business owners, Trainers and Coaches feel as though

their actions during a sales drive, training session or practice is what
will lead to positive change, when in fact it is the planning that
occurs before these actions that accounts for the true gains.

 

 

Become An Objective Monster

 

No one can learn how to create Programming for Youth for 6 or 12 month plans in a day.  It
takes time and diligent effort to acquire this skill, but your ability
to get better over time will have a direct and positive impact on

both your young athletes’ success rate as well as your businesses

ability to attract new clients. 

 

Set an objective for yourself to create a system or plan that allows

you to develop long-term and wide-focused agendas for your
young athletes.  Take several days or weeks if need be to create a
system that is streamlined and easy to implement – although your are

looking for a comprehensive system, the more basic you make it, the
more easy it will be to adhere to.

 

 

Action Steps

 

Start simply.  Take a piece of paper and write out where you want
your young athletes to be in 4 weeks.  Create headings and then
just fill in each category.  For instance, what skill sets are you
working on now?  To what degree of competency do you want
an athlete or team to be able to demonstrate that skill set in one
month’s time? 

 

This can also be applied to elite adolescent athletes.  Are you
working on squat or power clean totals right now?  If so,
where do you want these numbers to be in 4 weeks? 

 

 

Create Critical Path

 

Once you have organized your thoughts on where you would like

to be in 4 weeks, you have to consider how you are going to get
there.  On the same or a different piece of paper, right out how
many training sessions or practices you have with this athlete or
team between now and 4 weeks from now. 

 

Date each training session or practice on your piece of paper.  Now,
using your skills as a Trainer or Coach, literally just fill in the blanks. 
Compare where you want to be in 4 weeks with the number of
training sessions or practices you have between now and then.  In
order to accomplish your 4-week goal, what action steps along a
critical path must be taken? 

 

This is the essence of how to develop a long-term approach to
working with young athletes.  You will simply just write out your
next several training sessions or practices in order to meet the
objectives you have laid out for 4 weeks from now.

 

 

Critical Path & Beyond

 

This system can easily be applied to 6 months or even a year.  Just
follow the same type of procedure as mentioned above – set out an
objective for the time frame and decide where this athlete or team
needs to be within that time frame. 

 

Let’s say you have a 13-year-old athlete for 6 months and you want

to determine an objective and critical path.  Take out a piece of
paper and write out where you want this athlete to be in 6 months. 
Be descriptive with this – what skill sets do you want him to have
mastered?  What kind of movement-based techniques will he show

great competency in. 

 

Once you have decided that, break those large objectives down into

more manageable ones and make them your first 4-week objective.
To get to your end destination, where to you have to be at the end
of this month?  From there break it down even farther by deciding
on how many training sessions or practices you will have over the
next 4 weeks and design them in accordance with your 4 week
objective.  Next month, do the same thing.

 

 

The End Result You Need

 

An amazing thing happens when you create objectives and critical

plans like this.  You will start seeing results in your athletes and
teams beyond what you ever-dreamed possible.  Failing to plan is

one of the biggest concerns facing this industry.  It seems everything
is taken on a session-by-session basis with no vision or thought to
the long-term.  It could argued that individual Trainers and Coaches
didn’t know how to plan for the future… well; now you do!

 

Practice the skill of objective writing and critical path creation.  It
will take time to design a system that flows well for you, but it is
more than worth it to your young athletes’ and teams.

 

 

 

‘Till Next Time,

 

Brian

 

 

P.S. Don’t forget that tomorrow, Tuesday November 5, I am
unveiling the IYCA’s first CEU course – The Insider Secrets
to Program Design. Everything you ever wanted to know about Programming for Youth
and how I create training programs for the kinds of situations that
you face everyday…. Stay by your email for the announcement.