Archive for “Zeal” Tag

Becoming Indispensable to Young Athletes: Part 2

[wpfblike] young athletes

 

The only way to get more in the future is to do more wherever you are now.

 

Promotion in business isn’t an AWARD for the time you put in…

 

It’s a REWARD for the hustle and indispensability you create.

 

And the exact same holds true for your life at large.

 

Promotion in life (better relationships, increased fulfillment, more satisfaction) is EARNED through the daily action of striving to become better.

 

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Overtraining Young Athletes – Part 1

 

 

Young Athletes

I have long supported the notion that the zeal many Trainers and Coaches show with respect to conducting high intensity training sessions with young athletes is akin to the unsure actor who feels a need to "over-do" his or her role in a given appearance for fear that the audience may disapprove of his acting ability.

 

Almost like a "they paid for it and now I must deliver it" mind set.

As a Coach, you sometimes feel as though you must have your athletes walk away from a training session dripping with sweat and barely able to open their car doors. After all, if they don’t feel as though you are ‘training them hard enough’, they may opt to go and seek the services of a different Coach.

 

The problem is that overtraining syndromes are not hard to develop with adolescent athletes and must be recognized as an issue with respect to programming.

 

For ease of explanation sake, let’s just say that if your athlete walks into your training center at what would constitute a normal biological level, and if your training stimulus was at an intensity that would enable the athlete to dip below this normal biological level, but not be too much so as to not be able to ascend into a level of super-compensation, then, well… that would be good.

 

But there are energies in the world that effect an athletes recoverability from a training session (you know… recovery… that’s the part of the training routine during which your athlete’s body actually makes improvements and gains).

 

For example:

 

– Nutrition
– Emotional Stress
– Sleep

 

Let’s examine those individually for a second.

 

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Youth Conditioning Programs Tip of the Week

 

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Youth Conditioning Programs

Why hold on to the ‘norm’?

 

What’s the point of doing what everyone else always has?

 

Case in point.

 

I’ve worked with literally dozens of different high schools
over the past several years and almost always have been
asked to ‘add’ to there already existing programs rather
than re-create a system that I know will work better.

 

It takes time, but eventually the Coaching staff come to
learn that my style of athletic development works better
than what they currently have and turn the reigns
completely over to me.

 

And when that happens, do you know what my first step
is in changing the face of their youth conditioning programs and methods?

 

I separate the freshmen from everyone else.

 

High school represents a perfect developmental model.

 

4-years of having the same athletes – guaranteed.

 

So rather than making the young 14 year olds perform the
same lifts as the 18 year old seniors (and with the same
zeal of heavy loads) I remove them from the equation and
train them as a separate group.

 

We work on things like summation of forces, lift technique
and speed/agility basics.

 

This gives them a solid foundation on which to grow and
ensures they don’t get caught up in the ‘how much can you
lift’ world of high school athletics.

 

By the time they are sophomores, they are much better
equipped to handle loads and perform lifts with more
accuracy and precision.

 

Now this methodology flies in the face of what most high
school athletic programs do.

 

But trust me when I say that it’s a much superior system.

 

Don’t be afraid to go against the ‘norm’ with Youth Conditioning Programs.

 

Carlos Alvarez, looked at as the best high school
strength coach in the entire United States, will be discussing
topics just like this one next month at our International Summit.

 

MORE than worth taking a look at –

 

http://www.iyca.org/2009summit

 

 

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Brian