Archive for “Wonderful Weekend” Tag

Youth Speed Training in New Jersey

 

 

Youth Speed Training and Business

 

So I’m just back from a wonderful weekend in New Jersey at the Fast Track
to Fitness Millions conference.

 

The conference was hosted by my two favorite guys – Pat Rigsby and Nick
Berry.

 

The speaking line-up was an unbelievable ‘whose who’ of fitness industry
Coaches and Business Leaders –

 

BJ Gaddour
Zach Even Esh
Mike Boyle
Chris McCombs
Jim Labadie
Jason C Brown
Pamela Macelree

 

But in my opinion, the show was stolen by a man who has absolutely changed
everything about the way speed and agility is taught and trained.

 

My very good friend, Lee Taft.

 

As usual, Lee lit up the crowd with his no-nonsense, easy-to-understand and
cutting edge youth speed training system.

 

(more…)

IYCA Tip of the Week

 

Young Athletes and speed training

Maybe this is something you don’t need to hear.

 

But then again, maybe it’s something you really need to hear.

 

I say that because we all ‘seem’ to know it, but then whenever I
have a conversation with a Coach or Trainer about the topic,
I see the same mistakes being made over and over again.

 

So here it is bluntly –

 

Speed Training should not produce fatigue in your young athletes.

 

Again, it’s a ‘fact’ that every Coach and Trainer seems to
understand from a theoretical perspective, but seldom implements
properly in a practical setting.

 

Your work-rest ratios when programming for speed must be set
in such a way that your young athletes are fully recovered before
the next set commences.

 

Anything less than complete recovery means that CNS is not
firing with optimal capacity and you are, in fact, training lactic
acid threshold instead.

 

There are two ways to ensure that your young athletes are
recovered well between sets:

 

1) Make the ‘work’ portion of your speed training days low volume.
Rather than running 100 or 200 meters, work at acceleration in
10 and 20 meter bursts. That limited work output will require a
much smaller window of recovery.

 

2) Script a work-rest relationship of roughly 1:3 in terms of time.
Recovery is largely dependent on the condition of your young
athletes but is also very individually specific. Be wary of this
individual specification and be sure to ‘watch’ your athletes in
between sets for signs of full recovery.

 

 

Have a wonderful weekend!

 

 

PS Want to learn more about proven strength and speed training with young athletes
systems for young athletes?

 

https://completeathletedevelopment.com