Archive for “Complete Recovery” Tag

When Do You Train Young Athletes?

 

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Train Young Athletes Correctly

From a study published in the Swimming Science Bulletin. Authored by Brent S. Rushall & John Marsden:

 

"All sports require high degree of skill for superior performance. The major emphasis of a (youth athletic) training program should be skill excellence. For skills to be developed, learning should occur in non-fatigued states… It is advisable to schedule auxiliary training sessions either after a (sport) session or at some time that allows complete recovery from its execution so that no residual fatigue is carried over".

 

I’ve never mentioned this in literature, but have advocated it several times through lectures and seminars. Learning how to create appropriate training sessions is crucial to working with young athletes. If you are forced to have the technical practice AND the training session within the same day (as is typical), make sure that the training session comes AFTER practice. This keeps the body and CNS rested and for skill acquisition and demonstration during practice.

 

Ever notice that the "science" of strength, conditioning and fitness is more
complex than many realize?

 

Train Young Athletes

It’s really got nothing to do with just throwing some exercises together and
counting sets and reps.

 

Does speed training come before or after strength training?

 

When is it best to train the "core"?

 

Where does flexibility training fit into the daily picture?

 

Getting the most from your young athletes and truly making them the very
best they possibly can be means knowing as much as you can about how
to train them properly.

 

It’s not a day-by-day concept or fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants situation.

 

It requires a system.

 

A complete and comprehensive system that is internationally proven to be
successful and can be implemented by you TOMORROW with ease.

 

A system just like this one…

 

strength training for young athletes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Young Athletes Training Facts

 

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Young Athletes long term development insights

In lieu of an article or interview, I thought that I would hit you guys with some great information and solid insight into the training & development of Young Athletes

 

>> From a study published in the Swimming Science Bulletin. Authored by Brent S. Rushall & John Marsden.

 

"The question of whether (young athletes) should specialize in particular sports at an early age has been asked for many years. The evidence now seems to support programming activities that develop overall capacities rather than specialized functions while the young athlete is growing."

 

This is a fact that I have been preaching for many years. Contrary to popular belief, the BEST and MOST EFFICIENT means of developing a future champion is through slow progression and multilateral means.

 

 

>> From a study published in the Swimming Science Bulletin. Authored by Brent S. Rushall & John Marsden.

 

"If resistance training is to be done with children and young adolescents, exercises should involve sub-maximal loads, such as one’s own bodyweight, light dumbbells, weighted bags and/or medicine balls. Sophisticated and restrictive weight exercises, particularly on machines, are not ideal for children".

 

Did anyone read my article a few newsletters back on "Keeping Kids Off Weight Training Machines"? Trainers or coaches who advocate machine-based training for young athletes are simply not thinking straight.

 

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IYCA Tip of the Week

 

Young Athletes and speed training

Maybe this is something you don’t need to hear.

 

But then again, maybe it’s something you really need to hear.

 

I say that because we all ‘seem’ to know it, but then whenever I
have a conversation with a Coach or Trainer about the topic,
I see the same mistakes being made over and over again.

 

So here it is bluntly –

 

Speed Training should not produce fatigue in your young athletes.

 

Again, it’s a ‘fact’ that every Coach and Trainer seems to
understand from a theoretical perspective, but seldom implements
properly in a practical setting.

 

Your work-rest ratios when programming for speed must be set
in such a way that your young athletes are fully recovered before
the next set commences.

 

Anything less than complete recovery means that CNS is not
firing with optimal capacity and you are, in fact, training lactic
acid threshold instead.

 

There are two ways to ensure that your young athletes are
recovered well between sets:

 

1) Make the ‘work’ portion of your speed training days low volume.
Rather than running 100 or 200 meters, work at acceleration in
10 and 20 meter bursts. That limited work output will require a
much smaller window of recovery.

 

2) Script a work-rest relationship of roughly 1:3 in terms of time.
Recovery is largely dependent on the condition of your young
athletes but is also very individually specific. Be wary of this
individual specification and be sure to ‘watch’ your athletes in
between sets for signs of full recovery.

 

 

Have a wonderful weekend!

 

 

PS Want to learn more about proven strength and speed training with young athletes
systems for young athletes?

 

http://completeathletedevelopment.com