Archive for “Fitness Coach” Tag

Becoming A Better Youth Fitness Coach

 

Youth Fitness Coaching Tips From Dave Jack

Youth fitness Coach IYCA

 

By Pat Rigsby

 

It gets tough to access the credibility of coaches in this internet age. Many people that call themselves ‘coaches’ who haven’t actually coached anyone and there are many giving fitness advice that really shouldn’t.

 

So who do you trust?

 

That’s where the IYCA is here to help.

 

We constantly research and make sure to listen to coaches that are in-the-trenches getting great results. We know there is a lot of noise out there on the internet, so when we actually find quality information from a top-notch coach, we like to pass that info on.

 

I wanted to share a video with you from one of the best youth fitness coaches I know – IYCA Expert Dave Jack.

 

If you’ve never seen Dave present – it’s one of the most inspiring things you’ll ever see. The best part is, he not only talks the talk, he walks the walk.

 

Here is the link to the video -> http://youth-fitness- specialist.com

 

I know it’s a bold statement, but this one presentation will make you a better youth fitness coach.

 

Dave’s passion is contagious and this video will help you continue your mission on changing your client’s lives.

 

So, forget all of the internet ‘guru’ hype out there of pseudo coaches trying to sell you the next SECRET and checkout this powerful (and free) video and discover what a real elite coach does to become an even better coach.

 

Get the video here –> http://youth-fitness-specialist.com

 

Dedicated to Your Success,

Pat

PS – If you want to raise your level of coaching, I highly recommend you check this free video out by IYCA Youth Fitness Expert Dave Jack – http://youth fitness-specialist.com
pecialist.com

Coaching Young Athletes Back in The Trenches: Part 1

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Coaching Young Athletes – Teaching Again

The funniest thing happened 3 weeks ago…

 

I decided to go back to the grassroots of where I started

Insert/edit linkCoaching Young Athletes

.

 

Now make no mistake, although my ‘full time’ coaching days are about 7 years in the rearview mirror, I’ve maintained a coaching schedule through the entire thick and thin of both developing and running the IYCA.

 

I’ve worked with volleyball clubs, high school football, soccer, track and baseball teams and even moonlighted occasionally as a guest speed and agility instructor for local youth sporting associations.

 

But this summer, I’m heading back to the trenches.

 

 

I met a very young (23), ambitious and capable Coach who owns his own facility not more than 15 minutes from my house – we started chatting and 3 weeks ago, I agreed to take a position as a ‘Coach’ at his up and coming training center.

 

No pay.

 

This time, ‘In the Trenches’ is because I love it, feel obligated (in a good way) to give back and don’t need the money in order to pay my bills.

 

So the summer of 2011 for me, will be back doing what I love most every day:

 

Making young athletes better people.

 

Job #1 has been to review this facility’s current training system and attend live sessions as an observer.

 

To see if there are holes.

 

To understand what is expected of the athletes and staff in this facility.

 

To appreciate what will be expected of me.

 

My first inspected conclusion was simple… For a 23 year old Coach, this guy has got his stuff together very well!

 

In fact, the experience of ‘watching to determine’ got me thinking that I should chronicle to you what this 23 year old does so well… Because most of it is inherent to his personality and not something he’s learned from a textbook, conference or DVD.

 

So consider these heartily as potential inclusions for yourself and your own coaching young athletes habits…

 

(1) Specific Instruction Time

 

Although not IYCA certified when we met, this particular 23 year already understood, embraced and implemented perhaps the most critical of all IYCA Tenants:

 

Don’t Train… Teach.

 

By simply feelings his way through the coaching process, this young man knew instinctively that young athletes are ‘works in progress’ and that the urge to ‘make tired through hard work’ must be tempered by the undeniable need to teach proper execution.

 

His facility is not ‘numbers’ oriented.

 

He does not appease the symptomotolgy requirements for what most consider the hallmarks of quality training with respect to young people (breathless, sweaty, can’t walk the next day).

 

Every one of his training sessions is methodical in the way he teaches complexity through simplicity, prior to implementing an exercise into a given routine.

 

I’ve been very heartened watching this and believe fully that more Coaches need to take an honest look at there programming methods with respect to proper instruction.

 

Come back tomorrow for ‘Part 2’…

 

Everything I Learned in 15 Years In the Trenches… Working With More Than 20,000 Young Athletes:

 

Click Here: http://completeathletedevelopment.com/

 

– Brian

 

Coaching Young Athletes

 

Sport Specific Youth Training: Part 1

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Insert/edit linkYouth Training

For Sports

As a given sport evolves and the participants within that sport begin to break records and perform what was once considered impossible, you can be sure that advancements in training and conditioning regimes have occurred within that sport. Very few athletes ever become great sport technicians without the inclusion of a comprehensive athletic development and conditioning program as part of their training package. Over the past decade, the type of training and conditioning performed by young, developing and elite athletes has gone from basic fitness to more functionally- based and developmental activities. Figure skating and all of the disciplines under that umbrella are such examples.

 

Youth Training

 

For example, many training coaches prescribe that their skaters practice landing jumps and performing balance based skills (such as spirals) off the ice. On the other side of the spectrum, there are the ‘athletic developers’ who tend not to concern themselves with producing specified strength gains but instead work more directly at improving the complete athletic profile of the skater. The general conception among these professionals is that the greater degree of athleticism the skater has, the more likely he or she will be able to carry out athletic skills. While traditionalists often incorporate basic and conventional exercises into their training programs, the athletic developers come from a more movement based perspective. This style of conditioning is often referred to as ‘functional’ training, which is in fact a misnomer. Let’s examine that.

 

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What Inspires You To Work With Young Athletes?

 

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Young Athletes Give Back

The fact that you read my random thoughts every day means a great
deal to me.

 

No joke.

 

This has never been a "static" message medium for me.

 

I take great care in drafting the kind of information I think you need in
becoming the very best Youth Fitness Coach you can be.

 

And I don’t take the fact you read my daily ramblings for granted.

 

Over the past several days, I’ve recounted some memories I have from
the days when I spent all my waking hours in the trenches working with
kids.

 

Fond memories all.

 

And through them, you’ve gotten to learn a bit more about me.

 

But now I want something from you.

 

I want to know something that I know I have never asked before.

 

What inspires you to work with young athletes and youth fitness

participants?

 

Why is it so important to you?

 

How does it fulfill you?

 

I want to know.

 

Sincerely.

 

Leave your comments below…

Top 2 Factors in Becoming A World Class Youth Fitness Coach

 

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Youth Fitness Coach

Factor #1

 

1) Understanding How to Communicate

 

It’s imperative that you assess your young athletes personality type and temperment prior to each training session.

 

On a given day, the stress of teenage life could alter your young athletes mood dramatically.

 

If you aren’t aware of that, then you could be offering instruction to someone who just isn’t listening at all.

 

Engage each of your young athletes in an informal, yet important conversation prior to your training session.

 

Ascertain how they’re feeling about life in general.

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