Archive for “Differentiation” Tag

Young Athletes & Coordination – Part 3

Young Athletes & Coordination Series

Here is the third and final portion of ‘Young Athletes & Coordination’:

 

(3) Teenage Athletes Are ‘Too Old’

 

Now, while there is truth to the matter that many of the sensitive periods for coordination development lay during the preadolescent phase of life, it would be shortsighted to suggest that teenage athletes should not be exposed to this type of training.

 

Firstly, much of the training of coordination takes the form of injury preventative.  Any sort of ‘balance’ exercise, for example, requires proprioceptive conditioning and increases in stabilizer recruitment.  With ‘synchronization of movement’, large ROM and mobility work is necessary.  ‘Kinesthetic differentiation’, by definition, involves sub-maximal efforts or ‘fine-touch’ capacity which is a drastically different stimulus than most young athletes are used to in training settings.

 

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Young Athletes & Coordination – Part 1

Young Athletes Coordination Series

In this 3-part article, I will discuss the role and significance of ‘Coordination Training’ as it relates to both preadolescent and high school athletes:

 

The myths and falsehoods associated with young athletes Coordination Training are plenty.  I’ll outline the ‘Top 3’ here:

 

  1. Coordination is a singular element that is defined by a universal ability or lack of ability
  2. Coordination cannot be trained nor taught
  3. Coordination-based stimulus should be restricted to preadolescent children

 

This article will provide a broad-based look at each of those myths and shed some light on the realities behind coordination training as a continuum for the complete development of young athletes aged 6 – 18.

 

Part 1: Coordination & Young Athletes

 

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Complete Athlete Development: No More Guessing

No more guessing.

 

Proven strategies that work every time.

 

Complete Athlete Development:

That’s what you get when you follow what is in the DVD

An all-inclusive training system for working with

young athletes ages 6 – 18.

 

And yes. It’s been internationally field-tested and

proven to work.

 

Over 15,000 young athletes worldwide have been exposed

to my training system. And I may a lot of mistakes

with them along the way.

 

That’s kind of like the built-in guarantee of Complete

Athlete Development.

 

I’ve made mistakes and am certainly never afraid to

say I was wrong.

 

I used to work endlessly on linear speed technique.

 

Teach my young athletes who to accelerate forward,

drive their arms and get full hip extension with every

stride.

 

Then I realized I was wrong.

 

It’s not about linear speed. It’s about angles and

deceleration.

 

That’s why I created my Principles of Movement.

 

They teach young athletes how to accelerate and decelerate

through a progressive sequence –

 

1) Repeat Statically

2) Repeat Dynamically

3) Repeat Randomly

4) Predictable Specificity

5) Random Specificity

6) Individualization

 

 

I also used to think that working with pre-adolescents

was nothing more than playing some random games.

 

Tag

 

Sharks and Minnows

 

Capture the Flag

 

 

Then I realized that these games had to be cloaked in

certain aspects of coordination.

 

That without these coordination efforts, young athletes

would be grossly deficient in certain areas of athletic

ability by the time they reached the teenage years.

 

Some of the coordination facets include –

 

1) Kinesthetic Differentiation

2) Balance

3) Rhythm

4) Spatial Awareness

5) Movement Adequacy

 

 

Ever since I adopted all these ideas and put them into

practical use, I have seen the injury rates of my young

athletes drop considerably while their overall performance

increase dramatically.

 

Have a look at what other Coaches worldwide have to

say about my Complete Athlete Development system –

 

www.DevelopingAthletics.com/cad-short-copy

 

This training system has changed the philosophies,

training styles and lives of countless Coaches worldwide.

 

And all because I was in the trenches making mistakes.

 

Until I found the secret to it all…

 

www.DevelopingAthletics.com/cad-short-copy

 

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian

Drills for Young Athletes

Drills.

 

Drills for young athletes.

 

How do you create them?

 

Now that’s a question I get asked virtually everyday.

 

Here are three great ones to use with your young
athletes – especially if you work with kids between the
ages of 6 – 12.

 

 

(1) Line Jumps

 

Have your athlete(s) stand directly in front of a line
either painted or taped on the ground.

 

They should be only a few feet away from the line.

 

On your cue, they will jump and try to land with their
toes as close to the line as possible without actually
touching it.

 

The purpose of this drill is not ‘maximum power’ but
rather a fine touch or precise execution of power.

 

Have them walk back to the starting point and repeat.

 

Purpose –

 

:: Kinesthetic Differentiation (coordination)

:: Bodily Control

:: Jump/Land Technique

 

 

(2) Red/Green/Yellow Light

 

With this drill, you can use any action you want such
as lunge walking, hopping, 1-leg jumping or crawling.

 

Have your young athletes move (using one of the actions
listed above) in a straight line across a gym, floor or
field.

 

When you call out ‘Red Light’, they must stop and hold
in place exactly where they are.

 

‘Green Light’ requires them to resume at normal speed.

 

‘Yellow Light’ is a command that asks them to continue
the action, but at a slow pace – as slow as possible
in fact.

 

Purpose –

 

:: Movement Adequacy (coordination)

:: Systemic Strength

:: Reaction (coordination)

 

 

(3) Monkey Tag

 

There are several variations of tag that are absolutely
wonderful for young athletes…. and this is one of them!

 

Have your young athletes start in a ‘catchers’ position
with their hands also on the floor/ground.

 

When they move to avoid being ‘tagged’ they must do
so by crawling/jumping like a monkey.

 

Purpose –

 

:: Hip Flexibility & Strength

:: Spatial Awareness (coordination)

:: Reaction (coordination)

 

 

Three great drills based entirely on fun and what
young athletes in the 6 – 12 year old range need in
terms of athletic development.

 

And here’s the thing…..

 

Within the Level 1 – Youth Fitness Specialist certification,
we show you exactly what those drills look like as well
as many others.

 

In fact, we have our entire audience playing and
participating in tons of drills so that they could get
a feel for them and you could see what they looked like.

 

"How do you create drills for young athletes, Brian?"

 

Easy…..

 

You become certified through the IYCA.

 

Become certified now and get started on a brand new
career that is guaranteed to be both rewarding and
lucrative.

 

Here’s an exclusive link to a deal I’ve put together
for you –

 

https://www.iyca.org/fitspecialist1

 

And this is a perfect time for you.

 

All IYCA Members are invited to the Ryan Lee Boot Camp
in two weeks to enjoy a live IYCA Young Athletes Seminar hosted by
myself and Pat Rigsby for absolutely no charge.

 

Here’s that link again –

 


https://www.iyca.org/fitspecialist1

 

I hope to see you soon!

 

Brian

 

Youth Fitness: Are You Making a Huge Mistake?

 

 

Youth Fitness Industry Is Booming

Sometimes the signs all lead in the same direction –
Does that make sense?

 

The Youth Fitness and Sport Training niche is the fastest
growing in our entire industry.

 

Entrepreneur Magazine has cited this specific demographic
to be one of the most lucrative and expanding markets in the
world.

 

From private practice and franchising to government agencies
and consulting, the opportunities within this niche are
absolutely endless.

 

Very few professionals actually specialize in the area of
Youth Fitness or Sport Training making your ability to
become a local or worldwide leader all-but guaranteed.

 

That takes care of the whole ‘supply and demand’ equation
related to business success.

 

But there are ‘X Factors’.

 

Other realities that make taking the ‘Level 1 – Youth
Fitness
Specialist’ certification more than worthwhile
for you.

 

Any educational pursuit you take should have cross-over.

 

Even if the course is ‘niche-specific’, it should still
carry with it valuable information that you can use in
all facets of your business and career.

 

Check out this email I received earlier today from a
newly certified Youth Fitness Specialist –

 

"I loved your course. My whole training staff has gone
through the program and I can say unequivocally that
this is the best training tool we have EVER used – and
we don’t even focus on youth"

 

They don’t even focus on youth.

 

And still say it was the best course they ever experienced.

 

How many other certification courses offer that kind
of educational cross-over?

 

‘Coordination Development’ and the functionality of
training balance, kinesthetic differentiation and
movement adequacy has application with kids, young athletes,
senior citizens and everyone in between.

 

Our ‘Coaching and Communication’ material is absolutely
indispensible for understanding how to best inspire and
teach clients of any age or ability.

 

Our ‘Programming’ portion shows you how to create
progressive training routines that cycle through intensity
and loading parameters guaranteed to keep your clients
ascending without concern of over-training or burnout.

 

Who isn’t that applicable to?

 

And as you found out yesterday, the Level 1 course
is soon to be re-priced in order to betterreflect the high
quality of information it provides.

 

And your reasons for not thinking the youth fitness course worthwhile
are starting to seriously dwindle.

 

Here’s your exclusive link –

 

www.iyca.org/fitspecialist1

 

‘Till next time,

Brian