Archive for “Irish Mom” Tag

IYCA Brian in Toronto

IYCA is a family

It’s been a while since I trekked up to the Great White North and visited my
childhood friends and family.

 

Too long in fact.

 

It’s very easy to get sidetracked by the great standard excuse of "busy with
work"

 

Too easy in fact.

 

My family means the world to me and I admit to feeling overwhelmed at the
thought of seeing everyone again.

 

My oldest brother, Al, turned 50 earlier this year. Can’t wait to give him all
kinds of grief about that!

 

My other brother, Mike, is doing quite well, but given all the childhood
"beatings" he gave me, I intend to cook up something good to razz him
about as well!

 

My parents are both in great health and spirits.

 

My Irish Mom is feisty as ever and will most assuredly have a few choice
words for her baby boy considering he hasn’t been home for nearly two years.

 

My Dad, always the patriarch and calming influence over my family, is doing
absolutely great for a man of 80+ years and will almost certainly want to spend
some time with me showing me around his precious backyard garden.

 

Family is important.

 

But family comes in all shapes and sizes.

 

Truly and very sincerely, I consider my IYCA Family as an important an influence
in my life as I do my biological kin.

 

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IYCA wants to provide

Is the IYCA doing what you need?

Every single day of every single week, I receive emails from all over the world.

And it’s the most amazing thing I have ever experienced.

I mean, I was raised in Toronto, Canada by a little redheaded Irish Mom with a big temper (who I love dearly) and a crusty Italian Dad with the best "don’t screw with me" stare you have ever seen (who I rank as one of the greatest human beings on the planet).

I had two older brothers who took turns beating me up, and a dog named Tiger (named affectionately after me – my nickname when I was very young was Tiger apparently due to some kind of rambunctious energy I possessed… a fact I summarily deny by the way).

My point is that I was raised by common folks and in a common way.

I never had any sort of inkling when I was young, that I would grow up to become someone that every single parent, coach and trainer in the youth sports world would know and come to trust.

But that is exactly what has happened.

And my "inbox" counter is proof of that fact.

Every single morning, there are no fewer than 50 – 200 emails waiting for me.

50 – 200 emails multiplied by 365 days…

… You do the math!

More often than not, the emails are a simple message of ‘thanks’ from grateful Moms, Dads, coaches and trainers, all of whom want to send their regards for the information I offered them in my last week’s newsletter.

Other times, the emails are long and excited rambles from folks who just purchased one of our training products and are beside themselves at how much they learned about how to make their young athletes faster, stronger or better overall athletes.

In both cases, I get tickled pink!

I say all that because my strongest desire is to see that all young athletes are trained and cared for in the best way possible – so that they can both maximize their performance and remain safe and healthy in the process.

And that’s why I sit at my computer every morning and blush.

Because so many people, all over the world, decide to take the time to tell me exactly what my information has meant to them.

If you are one of the people who have written me a message of thanks, let me take this opportunity to reciprocate by thanking you for doing so.

It meant the world to me.

If you haven’t yet emailed me your thoughts, maybe you wouldn’t mind doing so now.

I want to make sure that all the information we provide you is actually working to making your life easier.

So tell me what you think.

Good or bad.

Are we giving you what you need, or do you need something else?

I want to know… and I want you to tell me.

Scroll down and let me know….

….

Is the IYCA doing what you need?

Memories With Young Athletes

 

 

This is the first Christmas that I won’t be able to be with my family.

 

34 Holidays, every one of them spent with my Mom, Dad and two brothers.

 

I’d be lying if I told you I wasn’t sad.

 

Since moving to the United States in 2000, I’ve only managed to see my
family on average twice per year.

 

This year, I haven’t seen them at all.

 

It’s very easy to get tunnel vision with work.

 

We want so badly to succeed, that we can easily fall into the game of
‘work first, everything else second’.

 

That’s happened to me a little bit these past 12 months and I’m 100%
determined to make sure it never happens again.

 

My Dad turns 80 this coming January and is in wonderful health.

 

My Irish Mom is feisty as ever.

 

My two older brothers are both happy and full of the same vigor that made
them my idols growing up.

 

I miss them all very much.

 

I’ll be heading up to Toronto in early January to see everyone and spend some
moments that I will cherish for a long time.

 

My Dad will wake up at the crack of dawn and enjoy his breakfast cereal while
standing at the window to the back deck looking out at the birds (his favorite
past time).

 

And I’ll be there to meet him every morning.

 

My Mom will sit on the couch every day at lunch and read the day’s newspaper.

 

And I’ll be sitting beside her every afternoon.

 

Sometimes life isn’t about the big moments.

 

It’s about the small ones that you can savor.

 

Some of your young athletes will go onto to amazing college or even professional
careers.

 

But most will use your training as a conduit to become better, more self-assured
people.

 

Every moment you spend with your young athletes should be worthy of savoring.

 

Moments in time that they can look back upon and smile.

 

The little things in life are the most beautiful and precious.

 

Be sure to create and savor as many as you can this Holiday Season.

 

On behalf of the IYCA, I want to take this opportunity to wish you a safe and
wonderful Holiday.

 

Embrace the small and insignificant things….

 

…. They’re all that really matter.

 

Brian