Archive for “Sport Development” Tag

Youth Conditioning Market: The Train Is Leaving…

Youth Conditioning Market: the perfect storm

Fitness Professionals with acumen for business will clearly recognize that the youth conditioning market represents a literal perfect storm in terms of revenue potential and stability.  There are relatively few professionals who specialize in this niche and yet the consumer demand is growing by the day.  In fact, unlike adult-centric demographics, the youth conditioning market contains sub-niches – all of which may satiate a respective Trainers desire to work with certain individuals and not others.

 

The most common opportunities found in the youth conditioning market are as follows –

 

1. Youth Conditioning Sporting Organizations

 

Countless youth conditioning athletic organizations from a range of sports, hire Fitness Professionals specially trained in the art and science of pediatric sport development, to conduct camps and clinics for both the young athletes themselves as well as the volunteer Coaches involved with the association.  The network created being involved in such an endeavor can greatly enhance a Personal Trainers ability to bring private youth clients on in a private setting.

 

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Youth Sports Conditioning Goal Confusion – Part 2

 

 

Youth Sports Conditioning Principles

Soccer is no different than any other sport at the youth level – and I am not
inferring that anyone suggested otherwise – but every youth coach of every
sport, seems to think that the technical nuances of their sport are some how
more intricate or specialized than the skills of other sports… and that is not
the case.

 

And you can replace ‘Soccer’ with ‘Baseball’, ‘Basketball’ or any other sport
in the above paragraph.

 

The point of the Goal Confusion article can be summed up in one sentence –

 

Coaches and Trainers must learn how and when to apply certain teaching
techniques and when to let kids ‘learn’ things for themselves – and that is
especially true when we design drills in which we tell our players that the
success of a drill is based on the outcome rather than the form.

 

If you have been a subscriber for any length of time, you know exactly how
I feel about teaching skill – it is imperative and an ability that frankly, many
Coaches and Trainers lack (when in consideration of pedagogical science
and individual player temperament).

 

Having said that, by not letting young kids simply ‘have at it’ on their own
once in a while or at certain phases of development, we risk limiting free
nervous system adaptability at large – and this has been a prevalent problem
in North American sports for years.

 

We over-teach our youngsters and do not allow them free exploration
(which is at the crux of sport development) but then marvel at how much
more ‘naturally skilled’ international athletes often tend to be.

 

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Why We Confuse Our Young Athletes

 

 

Young Athletes Correct Coaching

 

Soccer is no different than any other sport at the youth level – and I am not inferring that anyone suggested otherwise – but every youth coach of every sport, seems to think that the technical nuances of their sport are some how more intricate or specialized than the skills of other sports… and that is not the case.

 

And you can replace ‘Soccer’ with ‘Baseball’, ‘Basketball’ or any other sport in the above paragraph.

 

Goal Confusion for young athletes can be summed up in one sentence –

 

Coaches and Trainers must learn how and when to apply certain teaching techniques and when to let kids ‘learn’ things for themselves – and that is especially true when we design drills in which we tell our players that the success of a drill is based on the outcome rather than the form.

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Athlete Development Business Success Tips: My Training & Business Mentors

 

 

Athlete Development Business Success

Sometimes I enjoy writing about the ‘training’ aspects of Athlete Development, youth fitness and sport development.

 

Other times I like writing about the ‘business’ angles.

 

Today, I feel inspired to talk a little bit about both.

 

Over the years, my philosophies and thoughts about training young athletes have changed
significantly.

 

These changes were the result of learning a new concept or trying a new idea.

 

I read books.

 

Watched DVD’s.

 

Listened to speakers at live conferences.

 

I continue to do so even to this day.

 

And all of this self-directed study is what has lead me to my conclusions and guided my thoughts
regarding the developmental fitness process at the core of the IYCA Principles.

 

Now, many Athlete Development industry experts have had a significant hand in shaping my viewpoints –

 

Mike Boyle
Gray Cook
Jozeph Drabik
Mel Siff
Tony Reynolds
Bill Hartman

 

 

But no one professional has played a larger role in helping me create my training philosophies
than a man I consider to be one of the greatest Coaches alive today…

 

Lee Taft.

 

When I watched Lee’s ‘Groundbreaking’ DVD back in 2004, I was literally mesmerized by what
I saw.

 

I took notes feverishly.

 

Created drills based on his concepts.

 

Implemented his ideas into the training routines of my own young athletes.

 

And quite frankly, the results staggered me.

 

I have never been introduced to concepts that made more sense or were more easy to
Coach.

 

Lee’s speed and agility work is 100% pioneering and my own personal coaching philosophies have
never been the same since.

 

Now from a business perspective, I can say virtually the same stuff about a man whom I consider
to be an absolute genius when it comes to systems creation –

 

Nick Berry.

 

Just like you, I always struggled with the fine points of understanding how to be
the ‘Trainer’ and ‘Business Person’ in my company.

 

Finding enough time to train all your clients AND run the sales, marketing, scheduling and book
keeping.

 

And I admit, believe it or not, there was a time that I almost packed it in as a professional in this
industry.

 

Seriously.

 

Back in early 2003, I was struggling so badly with time management that I didn’t think I would
ever ‘get ahead’.

 

I remember distinctly having a conversation with Sara and explaining to her that I thought the
time was right for me to get out of the athlete development industry and move on to a more secure and predictable
profession.

 

Can you believe that?

 

And truth be told, I had difficulty with this balancing act right up until the beginning of 2008
when Nick became a full partner in the IYCA.

 

From Day 1, he started revamping our corporate structure and changing our working arrangements.

 

He put systems into place that allowed me to focus on one thing at a time and maximize me
efficiency in a given day.

 

Our Membership numbers increased.

 

Our revenue increased.

 

And my own personal workload DECREASED as a result of Nick’s efforts.

 

Lee Taft and Nick Berry.

 

The two guys that have changed everything about the way I train my young athletes and
run my youth athlete business.

 

And the best part?

 

They’ll both be at my International Summit in February sharing their secrets.

 

You likely know me as a ‘key player’ in the fitness industry.

 

Well known.

 

Highly respected.

 

Wildly successful.

 

Lee and Nick had a TON to do with that.

 

If I can admit that a good amount of the success I’ve experienced has come from learning from
these two fantastic professionals, just imagine what hearing what they have to say might to do
your career.

 

Worth a trip to Louisville this February?

 

Click on the link below to register now –

 

http://www.iyca.org/2009summit

 

 

‘TIll next time,

 

Brian