Archive for “Child Abuse” Tag

Youth Fitness and Politics… I Never Expected This

youth fitness

Mixing Youth Fitness & Politics doesn’t seem like a good idea to me.

 

But today, I’m taking a chance and risking a lot.

Here’s the thing, I’m fed up, overwhelmed by stupid and entirely annoyed.

 

But all at the same time, I really don’t know which side of the fence I sit on.

 

I sat glued to the TV playing absently in the background of my gym during a workout last week.

 

The opening sentence of a commercial caught my attention:

 

“The government thinks my child is fat, so decided it wants me to pay for that!!”

 

Yup… I was listening HARD after hearing that.

 

And here’s the gist of the message contained in the 90 second commercial:

 

Because of the rise in youth obesity, certain States within the U.S. have started adding additional taxes to the purchase of items such as soft drinks, sugar waters and certain ‘sports’ drinks.

 

Many families are against it, suggesting that the government has absolutely no place in deciding what they should or shouldn’t buy based on making some goods over-expensive with tax and therefore potentially out of budget.

 

Now… Here’s my take…

 

Politically, I want the government interfering with my life as little as possible.

 

Safe neighborhoods, freedom from crime and terrorism, clean drinking water and that’s about it!

 

I’ll take care of the rest myself.

 

So at first glance, I want NOTHING to do with specific tax measures placed on certain foods. Even the unhealthy ones.

 

It just doesn’t feel right.

 

BUT…

 

At what point is an external solution necessary in some capacity?

 

If parents continue their ignorance and/or stupidity, where will that leave their child in 10 years?

 

I’ve always considered Youth Obesity to be the most acceptable form of child abuse – and if you agree with that, then forced outside assistance is NECESSARY.

 

A child doesn’t ask to be beaten by his Mom or Dad.

 

But he or she also doesn’t ask to weigh 100 pounds by the age of 7 either.

 

And if a child was being beaten physically, as a society we would ALL want to run to the rescue of that young, defenseless person.

 

Why wouldn’t we here?

 

And here’s another way of thinking about it…

 

In many States, CIGARETTES have become an incredibly taxed purchase as a direct way of reducing smoking in both young and adult populations.

 

If they can’t afford them, they can’t smoke them.

 

Anyone complaining about that government intrusion?

 

So… I sit undecided (although leaning towards one direction).

 

What say you on this hot youth fitness topic?

 

Please, don’t be shy or brief – say what you feel:

 

 

– Brian

 

  

A Perfect Example of What’s Wrong in Youth Sports Training

 

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Youth Sports Training Done REALLY wrong


How+to+Teach+Kids+to+Play+Golf — powered by LIVESTRONG.COM

Here’s what I wrote to Scott –

 

I often refer to this as "Ignorant Child Abuse". Most parents and Coaches like this don’t truly understand the complexity of what they’re doing wrong. I don’t mean to excuse them or vilify them at all, but it’s a lack of understanding regarding neurological, mental and emotional development that has gotten us to where we are in youth sports.

 

From an "X’s & O’s" perspective, the teaching this golf pro is trying to do is both a moot point and entirely destructive from a future developmental perspective. At Matthew’s age, the key ingredient in athletic development is free play. Experience by doing. Learning via attempting.

 

This trial and error process of experimental movement is critical in creating what I call "Athletic Intelligence." Not unlike school, when we over-quantify what it is we want kids to do, we don’t allow their CNS to establish a frame of reference regarding understanding the pathology of why something works the way it does. That’s why elementary school is informal from a strict studying perspective. Teachers provide lessons and framework, but then allow students to experiment with finding results. That process is imperative in building a level of cognitive functioning that allows for future, more complex areas of study to be understood.

 

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