Coaching Young Athletes-The Blunt Truth About the IYCA

Coaching Young Athletes, the caveat and ‘Point #2’… 

 

(2) The Art of Coaching young athletes

 

In my humble opinion, I feel the IYCA has done a better job then any other certification entity with respect to this issue.

 

Programming is the Science.

 

Coaching is the Art.

 

Our  coaching young athletes ‘Long-Term Development Model’ is based on systems that work and are harmonious with what we know to be true about human growth and development.

 

But they are not fixtures of stone.

 

And we don’t want them to be.

 

We don’t know what the athlete limitations are in your community.

 

We can’t predict what discrepancies you’ll have in terms of skill levels within a given class.

 

We have no idea what amenities, equipment or flooring you have to work with.

 

Which is why we choose to indoctrinate you with CONCEPTS.

 

The overviews are complete, organized and very detailed.

 

How you apply them is based on your knowledge-level of the content we provide.

 

Some educational organizations opt to be scientifically heavy, but practically light.

 

Others, more sizzle then steak.

 

And some, just plain fluffy and not worth this industries time.

 

But the proverbial:

 

  • “Brian, I just want a system for S & Q that works every time…”
  • “Hey IYCA, I need a ‘plug-n-play’ model…”
  • “Couldn’t you just tell me exactly what to do…”

… Doesn’t exist.

 

We provide the science of motor development so you understand what happens along the developmental spectrum.

 

We provide the templates that explain what, why and how exercise stimulus should be presented within these different periods of development.

 

We provide Coaching Young Athletes and videos to show how certain things are done and why they’re done that way.

 

We provide the extraneous factors such as ‘motivation versus inspiration’, ‘principles versus values’ and African proverbs that explain the essence of communication and the importance of our work.

 

And we do it with pride.

 

Knowing that our efforts will build a legacy for children worldwide.

 

But the torch has most certainly been passed to your hands.

 

The ‘work-to-be-done’ is very much on your shoulders.

 

Did you know that teaching proper agility changes dramatically based on offensive or defensive responsibilities within any given sport?

 

That during peak-height-velocity (major growth spurt) young athletes must make mobility a much higher priority then strength (until the spurt is done, at which time strength becomes the most important variable of training)?

 

That the one training stimulus most successful at making young athletes faster is not ‘Plyometrics’, ‘jump training’ or even ‘speed work’ – it’s contralateral efforts (i.e. crawling and climbing).

 

We’ve shown you all that…

 

… Now you have to take the concepts and apply them for your situation.

 

We’ve got a world to change.

 

And we need all hands on deck to make it happen.

 

Join the Youth Fitness & Youth Sports Training Revolution Right Now…

 

Just Click Here —> http://iyca.org/products/yfs1

 

 

– Brian

 
Coaching Young Athletes 

6 Responses

  1. Coach Cz says:

    Communication is 80% non-verbal. We think that if we tell our athletes something, then we have taught them whatever it is we our telling them. Not so; we have to live it, and have PASSION.. That is what kids learn, they can’t argue with a coach that maybe is the Hockey coach, but does not play Hockey themselves; however, if they see that coach working out in their spare time then they will believe that getting and staying in shape is important. Your not just playing a game your becoming an athlete. Our country’s youth need to learn they we are Intellectual, Spiritual, Physicological, and PHYSICAL beings. Being a Physical person takes some work, and we are not about work. That has to change. America has a sumo wrestler mentality; go all out for 3 seconds, and then eat as much as you want. I’ve been doing my best for 40 years to help young people to understand “strength and conditioning” and I will never give up. Your orgaization is a hugh difference maker, Keep up the good work. “Every person needs to be able to do one pull-up”, it could save their lives.

  2. John Ebster says:

    Brian
    I totally agree that the IYCA does the most complete job of providing information. I can see the concern trainers have because most trainers conduct research with the attitude that they don’t have to re-invent the wheel. This is a given, but they must realize that seeing an exercise, applying the exercise and modifying the exercise is the ART. How many trainers are students of movement? How many have dedicated their time and efforts to watch people move? Not only the elite athlete but regular people in regular situations. Not all of the Kids are going to become college or Pro athletes, nor should that be the goal. The goal, as I see it, should be quality of life. Can future generations enjoy whatever activity or passion THEY choose? If we as fitness professionals communicate these ideas and , as I like to say “keep it real.” We won’t need canned programs and can provide, in group settings (classes) the ability for each individual to seek real fitness goals through our application of the processes taught by the IYCA,

  3. Phil Hueston says:

    Amen, Brian!

    The IYCA also ‘gets’ one essential life lesson that especially applies to athletic performance training and youth fitness.

    That lesson? Paying attention to what matters is what’s most important – and what pays the greatest dividends!

    Spotting that one child who needs a pat on the back and a little “attaboy” for mastering something that other kids seem to catch on to without effort can make all the difference in the world – to that one child.

    Recognizing the difference between when an athlete physically can’t perform an exercise and when they’ve lost the motivation to do it (or do it right) can often save a youth athlete from burnout or just giving up on athletics all together.

    These are some of the lessons of coaching that the IYCA teaches and reinforces. Sometimes those lessons are delivered directly (via courses, interviews, articles, etc.) and other times indirectly through contact with other IYCA pro’s who have experience and insight to share.

    These are the things I’ve been grateful for since my first connection with the IYCA and it’s message.

    Keep up the great work!
    Phil Hueston

  4. Phil Hueston says:

    Amen, Brian!
    The IYCA also ‘gets’ one essential life lesson that especially applies to athletic performance training and youth fitness.
    That lesson? Paying attention to what matters is what’s most important – and what pays the greatest dividends!
    Spotting that one child who needs a pat on the back and a little “attaboy” for mastering something that other kids seem to catch on to without effort can make all the difference in the world – to that one child.
    Recognizing the difference between when an athlete physically can’t perform an exercise and when they’ve lost the motivation to do it (or do it right) can often save a youth athlete from burnout or just giving up on athletics all together.
    These are some of the lessons of coaching that the IYCA teaches and reinforces. Sometimes those lessons are delivered directly (via courses, interviews, articles, etc.) and other times indirectly through contact with other IYCA pro’s who have experience and insight to share.
    These are the things I’ve been grateful for since my first connection with the IYCA and it’s message.
    Keep up the great work!
    Phil Hueston

  5. Robert A. Albano says:

    I coach youth soccer and use the IYCA methods and suggestions for coaching for years and seen the development of young atheletes to go on to play baseball, soccer, basketball,field and track in High School and come back to Thank me for giving them the tools to succeed.

  6. The blunt truth about the IYCA….

    1. Best minds in education in youth development
    2. Best information dedicated to it’s niche
    3. Best Founder and face of any certification

    The IYCA prepares you for delivering sound results IF you can learn and understand how to apply. This organization is not about giving you a “plug-n-play” model”, but simply giving you the tools to build, and more education you could ask for to help the development of youth.

    If you truly care about youth development and aren’t certified, you’re missing out big time.

    Carmen Sturniolo

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