Archive for “Coaching Young Athletes” Tag

The Happy Youth Fitness Specialist: Part 2

Youth Fitness Specialist And Happines Part 2… 

As Elena and I pondered the sources from which happiness flowed we wondered if there was another catalyst to its fulfillment, a life of solidarity.  Whether fully engaged in a labor of love or committed to a purpose greater than yourself, can you truly be the best version of yourself, by yourself?  Without being challenged, inspired and supported by a like minded peer group, how do we ever know whether we are progressing or regressing?  Further, what is a life of pleasure without others to share, enjoy and explore it with. 

 

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Young Athletes Need Teaching… Not Training

Young Athletes Need More Than Training A staple of the IYCA Code:

 

“Teach young athletes… Don’t Train”.

 

A little scary, perhaps?

 

Most certainly counterintuitive?

 

How do you talk to Coaches andYoung Athletes who think that every training session needs to be a ‘throw-up-fest’ of nothing but hard work?

 

Watch this young athlete principles video and find out…

 

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Olympic Lifting & Young Athletes

Olympic Lifting Educational Opportunity

I posted this article on my blog back in 2009 but decided to re-hash it for a very good reason…

 

On Monday July 11, the incredible Wil Fleming of Athletic Revolution will be joining me for a free educational event:

 

Olympic Lifting – Technique, Programming & Progressions

 

You can join us live (Monday at 7:30pm – EST) OR you can register now and enjoy the playback whenever it fits your schedule.

 

Click below right now to register for absolutely no charge:

 

http://iyca.org/olympic-lifts/

 

Now, read this to see the depth of Wil’s knowledge of this subject:

 

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Organized Chaos in Kids Training Programs


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Kids Training Programs Guest post by Phil Hueston

 

Most sports performance kids training programs (yes, maybe even yours) have 2 fatal flaws:

 

1) they don’t look anything like sports

 

2) they’re B-O-R-I-N-G!

 

 

Consider these questions:

 

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Youth Fitness Greatest Coaching Resource?


 

“Children and Sports Training” by Jozef Drabik.

 

By far, the most important read I’ve ever had.

 

An incredibly detailed look at developmental youth fitness, critical elements of coordination and pedagogical (Coaching) science.Youth Fitness

 

You can find this book virtually anywhere online for next to nothing.

 

Just Google the name and author.

 

How about you?

 

What is your #1 resource of all time and the one book, course or DVD that has had the greatest impact on your career?

 

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Coaching Young Athletes Back in the Trenches: Part 3

Coaching Young Athletes – Here’s the last part of what you need to know to become a great Coach…

 

(3) Constant Praise

 

This one is something I wish more Fitness pros understood when Coaching Young Athletes .

 

If your young athlete performs an exercise that is 90% incorrect, the only option you have in terms of making sure he or she eventually gets it, is to comment on the 10% that was right.

 

I know… The urge is to correct the mistakes, but as I’ve been saying for years now:

 

The human body comes equipped with an auto-regulatory feature that knows where proper versus improper functional execution lies. 

 

The goal is to ‘allow’ the body-brain to relax and find proper execution for itself.

 

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Coaching Young Athletes Back in The Trenches: Part 2

Coaching Young Athletes – We learn from the Best…

 

(2) Coaching Presence

 

Yet another intuitive intangible that I truly believe cannot be taught… But CAN be improved upon so long as you’re prepared to look in the mirror…

 

A quality Coach has a presence. 

 

Not because they are dictators or aristocratic morons who feel compelled to proclaim their dominance, but because they simply have a commanding authority that is automatically respected and impossible to ignore when Coaching Young Athletes.

 

In my career, I have 3 Coaches who fit this bill perfectly  –

 

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Coaching Young Athletes Back in The Trenches: Part 1

Coaching Young Athletes – Teaching Again

The funniest thing happened 3 weeks ago…

 

I decided to go back to the grassroots of where I started

Insert/edit linkCoaching Young Athletes

.

 

Now make no mistake, although my ‘full time’ coaching days are about 7 years in the rearview mirror, I’ve maintained a coaching schedule through the entire thick and thin of both developing and running the IYCA.

 

I’ve worked with volleyball clubs, high school football, soccer, track and baseball teams and even moonlighted occasionally as a guest speed and agility instructor for local youth sporting associations.

 

But this summer, I’m heading back to the trenches.

 

 

I met a very young (23), ambitious and capable Coach who owns his own facility not more than 15 minutes from my house – we started chatting and 3 weeks ago, I agreed to take a position as a ‘Coach’ at his up and coming training center.

 

No pay.

 

This time, ‘In the Trenches’ is because I love it, feel obligated (in a good way) to give back and don’t need the money in order to pay my bills.

 

So the summer of 2011 for me, will be back doing what I love most every day:

 

Making young athletes better people.

 

Job #1 has been to review this facility’s current training system and attend live sessions as an observer.

 

To see if there are holes.

 

To understand what is expected of the athletes and staff in this facility.

 

To appreciate what will be expected of me.

 

My first inspected conclusion was simple… For a 23 year old Coach, this guy has got his stuff together very well!

 

In fact, the experience of ‘watching to determine’ got me thinking that I should chronicle to you what this 23 year old does so well… Because most of it is inherent to his personality and not something he’s learned from a textbook, conference or DVD.

 

So consider these heartily as potential inclusions for yourself and your own coaching young athletes habits…

 

(1) Specific Instruction Time

 

Although not IYCA certified when we met, this particular 23 year already understood, embraced and implemented perhaps the most critical of all IYCA Tenants:

 

Don’t Train… Teach.

 

By simply feelings his way through the coaching process, this young man knew instinctively that young athletes are ‘works in progress’ and that the urge to ‘make tired through hard work’ must be tempered by the undeniable need to teach proper execution.

 

His facility is not ‘numbers’ oriented.

 

He does not appease the symptomotolgy requirements for what most consider the hallmarks of quality training with respect to young people (breathless, sweaty, can’t walk the next day).

 

Every one of his training sessions is methodical in the way he teaches complexity through simplicity, prior to implementing an exercise into a given routine.

 

I’ve been very heartened watching this and believe fully that more Coaches need to take an honest look at there programming methods with respect to proper instruction.

 

Come back tomorrow for ‘Part 2’…

 

Everything I Learned in 15 Years In the Trenches… Working With More Than 20,000 Young Athletes:

 

Click Here: http://completeathletedevelopment.com/

 

– Brian

 

Coaching Young Athletes

 

The Rest of the ‘Long-Term Training’ Story…

Long term training for sports

I’ve spent this week giving you the details and insights on my presentation for the upcoming Perform

Better conferences. 

Long-Term Training Models

 

You’ve read all the important factors…

 

… Now it’s time to receive the rest of the story (the stuff that will REALLY (more…)

Young Athlete Speed & Agility Development

Here is some fantastic and practical advice on how to create programs and drills that will make your young athletes quicker and more agile…

 

 

Young Athlete Speed & Agility Training Made Easy:

Click Here —> http://CompleteAthleteDevelopment.com/

 

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The Blunt Truth About High School Athletes

High School Athletes

high school athletes

 

b) Learning Exploration (10 – 13)

 

  • Very similar in terms of primarily Outcome-Based (roughly 80%) and explorative in nature. In this phase, due to increased Training, Biological and Emotional ages however, we can add points of quantified instruction. The CNS is still very plastic and therefore adaptable to change – what we become fluent in while young, we retain forever.
  • Exploration type activities (games, skills etc) are more formalized and advanced. What was a simple 180-degree jump and land, now is a 180-jump and land with transition to back pedal jog. Adding complexity to movement sequences will increase the warehousing of neural/athletic ability.
  • Teach complex, multi-joint movements in a skill set fashion (4 points that guide young high school athletes from set-up to execution. ‘Squat’, for example:
    • Set Your Feet
    • Eyes Up
    • Hips Back
    • In-Steps Off
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