Archive for “Backside” Tag

Youth Conditioning Programs Using Ropes & Tires

 

IYCA Expert Dave Gleason Explains How To Develop Youth Conditioning Programs Using Unconventional Methods

 

youth conditioning programs

As long as your programming has developmental justification that points pack to the required elements of the IYCA system…everything is in bounds!

This includes tires and battle ropes. Many of our AR franchise partners are co branded or are also a Fitness Revolution Franchisee as well. That said, many of our trainers and coaches have experience with large tractor tires and battle ropes. With safety mechanisms in place, very effective and fun activities can be implemented in your youth conditioning programs for 6-9 (Discovery) and 10-13 (Exploration) sessions.

Here are a few examples of youth conditioning programs to get your creative juices flowing:

1. Team Tire Flip.

youth conditioning programs

Even with a 500+ pound tire if you orientate your young athletes well and put yourself in a position to effective spot this activity, this is a very safe team building and exercise. Systemic strength, object manipulation, and cooperation are all aspects of this fun drill.

Have your athletes form a semi circle around the backside of the tire. Cue them to keep their toes close to the tire, and keep their eyes up as they place their hands underneath the tire. “On a count of three we all lift and drive the tire forward.”

2. Team Tire Drag (Pull).

This systemic strength pulling activity is an adventurous variation of tug o war.

Place a battle rope through the middle of a large tire so there are two equal lengths of rope to pull on. Place your athletes evenly on each length of rope. On your command your athletes will pull and drag the tire to a designated area or length.

You can add variation and problem solving by experimenting with how many athletes you can take off of pulling duties to sit on the tire with the remaining athletes still able to move the tire. Then experiment with different kids on the tire vs. pulling.

youth conditioning programs

3. Angry Monkeys.

This super fun exercise is a battle rope wave drill masked by as silly name and animation during the movement. Straight from the brain of Autism Fitness Expert, Eric Chessen, the set up virtually the same depending on the age and size of the athletes. Your 6-9 year old athletes will do well with a single rope wave. A mature 12 or 13 year old will handle a rope end in each hand with no problem. A 40 foot, 1.5 inch in diameter, rope works very well.

Instruct your athletes to act like an angry monkey with the rope end in their hands while making a wave in the rope. Let them make “angry monkey” noises. 10-20 seconds of work is optimal depend on the age of the athletes in your group.

4. Battle Rope Relay.

youth conditioning programs

Object manipulation, cooperation, spatial awareness systemic strength and kinesthetic differentiation are included in the benefits of this game.

Lay out a battle rope in a straight line on the ground. Form two lines of athletes, one line at each end of the rope. The first athlete in each line grabs hold of the end of the rope like a relay baton. On your command the athletes race to opposites ends and hand the rope off to the next person in line.

This is a perpetual race because there is no winner. Give your athletes 2-3 runs each and then give the group a rest.

youth conditioning programs

When ever you can think out of the box and apply some additional fun and adventure into your Youth Conditioning Programs for young athletes you should do so! If something is working well for you please share in in the IYCA Insiders Forum.

Keep changing lives!

 

The Simple Math Behind Young Athletes Running Faster

 

How to Get Young Athletes to Run Faster

By Latif Thomas

 

 

If you want to improve athletic performance you have to make your young athletes faster. That’s pretty straight forward.

 

So let’s break the process down in very clear terms.

 

For the sake of argument, let us assume that an athlete’s one rep max for deadlift directly relates to how fast they can run. (It doesn’t, but for the sake of this argument, it will make things clear.)

 

young athletes

 

So, The Athlete has a max deadlift of 500 pounds. Therefore, if everything is done perfectly, The Athlete can apply 500 pounds of force to the ground with every step.

 

In a perfect world, if the athlete runs a race taking 50 steps, they will run their absolute ‘best case scenario’ time if they apply 500 pounds of force for all 50 steps.

 

But we know from working with young athletes that things don’t go perfectly with every stride. Or anything close to it.

 

So let’s look at the first 5 steps of the race and see where things break down (keeping in mind that 500 pounds of force is a ‘perfect’ step/stride.

 

STEP 1. Athlete doesn’t push into the ground/blocks hard enough, so only applies 400 pounds of force.
Result: Only 80% efficient (20% of potential force wasted)

 

STEP 2: Athlete’s foot lands heel first, so only applies 350 pounds of force.Young athlete running
 

If your heel touches the ground, you’re running slow!
Result: Only 70% efficient (30% of potential force wasted)

 

STEP 3: Knee angle opens up too much and foot strike takes place in front of Center of Mass, applying 350 pounds of force.
Result: Only 70% efficient (30% of potential force wasted)

 

STEP 4: Too much backside mechanics, so Athlete can’t recover swing leg quickly enough to drive foot down into the ground, applying 300 pounds of force
Result: Only 60% efficient (40% of potential force wasted)

 

STEP 5: Athlete recovers from bad start, gets foot down under hips, pushes the ground back and away, applying 450 pounds of force.
Result: 90% efficient (10% of potential force wasted)

 

Now plot this out over the course of the entire race/distance being run and think about how much potential ‘speed’ is wasted simply due to lack of efficiency or running skill.

 

In just 5 steps, The Athlete applies an average of 370 pounds of force per step, out of a possible 500. This means The Athlete has an efficiency rating of 74%.

 

Bottom Line: If the athlete had better running form, better understanding of *how* it should feel when running, better coaching feedback, etc., they would be more efficient with each step and, based on simple physics, would run faster.

 

So, you can make athletes (in any sport) faster just by making them more efficient. How?

 

1. Regularly practice speed drills (with perfect technique) so athletes understand what good running form FEELS like.

 

2. Give technical feedback. If you, the coach, know what the athlete should be doing, you can help them clean up their form. But if you don’t tell them what to do (and give them correct information) they’re not going to figure it out on their own.

 

Young athletes running drills

 

This is a torn hamstring waiting to happen. (I know from experience!)

 

If you don’t give them good technical feedback, they’re just going to keep practicing bad running and it will keep getting worse.

 

3. Improve general and absolute strength, hip and ankle mobility and coordination. Core work, weight training and body weight training will improve the inter and intramuscular coordination required to maximize force application/speed.

 

Now, let’s say you improve average efficiency of The Athlete (by using the above methods) from 74% to 84%. Average force applied per stride goes from 370 pounds to 420 pounds.

 

Again, simple physics tells us the Athlete MUST get faster.

So, if you want young athletes to improve, you must make them more efficient.

Here’s the next thing you need to focus on:

 

Let’s say you improve The Athlete’s absolute strength from 500 pounds to 600 pounds. But you *don’t* make The Athlete any more efficient.

 

So they stay at 74% Efficiency, but based off of a greater ability to apply force to the ground. So the athlete now can apply 444 pounds of force per stride (74% of 600).

 

Think about it:

 

By improving maximum strength, but not touching Efficiency, The Athlete goes from 370 pounds of force per stride to 444.

 

That’s a HUGE improvement in terms of athletic performance.

 

So two identical athletes with identical Efficiency Rates step on the starting line. But one can apply 600 lbs. of force and the other 500 lbs. The physically stronger (yet otherwise identical) Athlete wins the race Every Single Time!

 

The moral of the story? Get your athletes in the weight room if you want them to perform better!

 

Now, let’s say you improve absolute strength from 500 to 600 pounds AND you improve average efficiency from 74% to 84%.

 

The Athlete now has an average force application of 504 pounds per stride (84% of 600).

 

Again, think about it. The stronger, more efficient athlete applies more force to the ground (runs faster) at only 84% efficiency than an otherwise identical athlete with 100% efficiency but significantly lower strength levels.

 

The numbers don’t lie!!!

 

What’s my point?

 

You can get ridiculous results with your young athletes when you focus on improving strength *and* efficiency.

 

This is where the argument that speed can’t be coached breaks down. Sure you can’t turn kids into Usain Bolt. But they’re generally so weak and inefficient (even the ‘good’ ones) that they can make ‘night and day’ improvements by becoming more well rounded young athletes.

 

All you have to do is look at the numbers and put a plan into place that focuses on long term development of specific biomotor skills: speed, strength, mobility, coordination and endurance.

 

To your success,

 

Latif Thomas

Young Athletes: The Key to Agility Is Positioning

 

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Young Athletes Agility

 

Tony Reynolds young athletesTony Reynolds says…

Personally, I have never thought of flexibility or mobility as a factor that plays a huge role in an athlete being able to assume an athletic stance. I do not see where there is enough flexion/extension in any joint throughout the chain where this is really an issue. If you are getting that low you are never going to be overly quick out of the position.

 

For me, it has always been a matter of reeducation. Young athletes simply have no idea how to align their bodies to create the most effective angles for spontaneous multi directional movement. Often they have been coached wrong or not coached at all and have created their own interpretation of the stance.

 

So then it comes down to teaching. Therefore, one must be careful with their “selection of words” when describing movements and positions to kids and young.

 

For instance, flat back can often also mean a completely vertical torso. MANY kids will automatically make this correlation (and so do many coaches.)

 

I prefer using the terms “neutral” and “tilted.” As Kwame suggested, we work on rounding the spine, we work on arching the spine, and we work on keeping the spine in a “neutral” alignment. Then it is a matter or “tilting” the neutral spine forward as the hips move back.

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Training Young Athletes Everyday: Why The IYCA Works

 

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Training Young Athletes Coaching Insight

I’m an internet guru.

 

I’m a corporate type.

 

I’ve lost touch because my computer chair and my backside have become great friends these past few years.

 

Really?

 

Why don’t you have a look at this 60 second video and find out if that’s true…

 

 

Isn’t it time you became associated with a young, vibrant and energetic fitness organization that actually UNDERSTANDS what it’s like to be you?

 

The kind of organization that is on the cutting-edge of a market ready to explode.

 

The kind of organization who CREATES OPPORTUNITIES for its members because our members are direct images of ourselves.

 

We aren’t about awarding you credentials so you can add three or four letters after your last name.

 

We’re about creating change and Training Young Athletes.

 

Revolutionizing an industry.

 

And empowering you to enjoy the kind of successful and fulfilling careers we enjoy every day of our lives.

 

The IYCA – It’s what’s ‘new’ and ‘real’

 

Tomorrow I shut the door.

 

Maybe it’s time you gave us a second look –

 

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