Archive for “Athlete Development” Tag

Young Athletes Need Teaching… Not Training

[wpfblike]

Young Athletes Need More Than Training A staple of the IYCA Code:

 

“Teach young athletes… Don’t Train”.

 

A little scary, perhaps?

 

Most certainly counterintuitive?

 

How do you talk to Coaches andYoung Athletes who think that every training session needs to be a ‘throw-up-fest’ of nothing but hard work?

 

Watch this young athlete principles video and find out…

 

(more…)

Youth Fitness Greatest Coaching Resource?

[wpfblike]

 

“Children and Sports Training” by Jozef Drabik.

 

By far, the most important read I’ve ever had.

 

An incredibly detailed look at developmental youth fitness, critical elements of coordination and pedagogical (Coaching) science.Youth Fitness

 

You can find this book virtually anywhere online for next to nothing.

 

Just Google the name and author.

 

How about you?

 

What is your #1 resource of all time and the one book, course or DVD that has had the greatest impact on your career?

 

(more…)

Coaching Young Athletes Back in The Trenches: Part 2

[wpfblike]

Coaching Young Athletes – We learn from the Best…

 

(2) Coaching Presence

 

Yet another intuitive intangible that I truly believe cannot be taught… But CAN be improved upon so long as you’re prepared to look in the mirror…

 

A quality Coach has a presence. 

 

Not because they are dictators or aristocratic morons who feel compelled to proclaim their dominance, but because they simply have a commanding authority that is automatically respected and impossible to ignore when Coaching Young Athletes.

 

In my career, I have 3 Coaches who fit this bill perfectly  –

 

(more…)

Coaching Young Athletes Back in The Trenches: Part 1

[wpfblike]

Coaching Young Athletes – Teaching Again

The funniest thing happened 3 weeks ago…

 

I decided to go back to the grassroots of where I started

Insert/edit linkCoaching Young Athletes

.

 

Now make no mistake, although my ‘full time’ coaching days are about 7 years in the rearview mirror, I’ve maintained a coaching schedule through the entire thick and thin of both developing and running the IYCA.

 

I’ve worked with volleyball clubs, high school football, soccer, track and baseball teams and even moonlighted occasionally as a guest speed and agility instructor for local youth sporting associations.

 

But this summer, I’m heading back to the trenches.

 

 

I met a very young (23), ambitious and capable Coach who owns his own facility not more than 15 minutes from my house – we started chatting and 3 weeks ago, I agreed to take a position as a ‘Coach’ at his up and coming training center.

 

No pay.

 

This time, ‘In the Trenches’ is because I love it, feel obligated (in a good way) to give back and don’t need the money in order to pay my bills.

 

So the summer of 2011 for me, will be back doing what I love most every day:

 

Making young athletes better people.

 

Job #1 has been to review this facility’s current training system and attend live sessions as an observer.

 

To see if there are holes.

 

To understand what is expected of the athletes and staff in this facility.

 

To appreciate what will be expected of me.

 

My first inspected conclusion was simple… For a 23 year old Coach, this guy has got his stuff together very well!

 

In fact, the experience of ‘watching to determine’ got me thinking that I should chronicle to you what this 23 year old does so well… Because most of it is inherent to his personality and not something he’s learned from a textbook, conference or DVD.

 

So consider these heartily as potential inclusions for yourself and your own coaching young athletes habits…

 

(1) Specific Instruction Time

 

Although not IYCA certified when we met, this particular 23 year already understood, embraced and implemented perhaps the most critical of all IYCA Tenants:

 

Don’t Train… Teach.

 

By simply feelings his way through the coaching process, this young man knew instinctively that young athletes are ‘works in progress’ and that the urge to ‘make tired through hard work’ must be tempered by the undeniable need to teach proper execution.

 

His facility is not ‘numbers’ oriented.

 

He does not appease the symptomotolgy requirements for what most consider the hallmarks of quality training with respect to young people (breathless, sweaty, can’t walk the next day).

 

Every one of his training sessions is methodical in the way he teaches complexity through simplicity, prior to implementing an exercise into a given routine.

 

I’ve been very heartened watching this and believe fully that more Coaches need to take an honest look at there programming methods with respect to proper instruction.

 

Come back tomorrow for ‘Part 2’…

 

Everything I Learned in 15 Years In the Trenches… Working With More Than 20,000 Young Athletes:

 

Click Here: http://completeathletedevelopment.com/

 

– Brian

 

Coaching Young Athletes

 

Long Term Training Models: Part 2

[wpfblike]

Long Term Training…

Point #2 – M.O.L.D: The Key to Long-Term training and Athletic Performance

 

Taken straight from the IYCA’s Youth Fitness Specialist – Level 1 certification material, this acronym should be the calling card for every single professional and/or volunteer working with young athletes:

 

M = Movement Must Dominate

 

Every aspects of your work with young athletes must come under the pretense of ‘movement’. Free-motion-based strength, torso, ROM, mobility, flexibility, speed, agility and cardiovascular training absolutely must be key to everything.

 

O = Open to Communication Variances

 

Coaching and communication are two of the much more important, but largely ignored aspects of proper athletic development.

 

Kids learn at different rates and via different means. If you are not prepared to accept that and create a system of communication that reinforces both positivist and your willingness to educate, you will only ever be half a Coach.

 

L = Learning Style Variances (more…)

Training Young Athletes: Concept vs. Cool

[wpfblike]

Training Young Athletes: exactly what the IYCA is all about.

Specifically related to our Concepts when training young athletes long-term development.

 

There are certain core values as it relates to training young athletes and people that we disclose within our ‘Youth Fitness Specialist – Level 1’ certification course, and you either need to hear them or hear them again…

 

These centralized principles extend to the entire litany of IYCA material, at large.

 

 

(1) Concept vs Cool (more…)

Sport Specialization vs Sport Exclusivity

Sport Specialization‘.

 

Is it truly detrimental to the long-term success of a young athlete?

 

If so, how is it possible to spend the number of years necessary to develop the skill in a specific sport if your goal is to play at the next level?

 

Watch this –

 

 

(more…)

How to Assess Young Athletes

[wpfblike]

Do you ever ‘test’ your Young Athletes?

 

Their speed?

 

Strength?

 

Flexibility?

 

If so, why?

 

You know, most Coaches and Trainers can’t answer that question.

 

They test because they think they’re supposed to.

 

That they need to in order to show ‘results’.

 

But there are other reasons…

 

(more…)

Early Sport Specialization: Part 2

[wpfblike]

sport specialization

 

Sport specialization the brief, but telling conclusion…

 

The study’s findings are relatively convincing.  The elite group tended to devote far less time at earlier ages in sport-specific training. 

 

Additionally, early Sport Specialization was found to be a likely predictor of classification as a near-elite athlete. 

 

In other words, while the early sport specialization may have been beneficial to overall performance, the athletes who tended to excel the most had instead focused on multilateral athletic development early in their growth and avoided the high technical skill, intensity, and specificity of unique sport preparation until such foundational skills were well established.

 

(more…)