Archive for “Strength Coaches” Tag

Youth Speed Training Mistakes

Youth Speed Training

Youth Speed Training Expert Opinions

Coach Robert Dos Remedios is considered one of the best Strength Coaches in College sports.

 

And he agrees.

 

So does Sue Falsone.

 

Sue is the former Head Physical Therapist for the Los Angeles Dodgers and current Director of Physical Therapy for the vaunted ‘Athletes Performance’ facility in Arizona.

 

The ability of an athlete to become ‘elite’, ‘professional’ or ‘world-class’ is based almost entirely on what kind of development happened when they were young.

 

Coach Dos explained to me how puzzled and frustrated his is year-in and year-out to have all-state high school athletes come in as freshmen to his program…

 

… Only to be lacking in the BASICS of speed, agility and strength.

 

As far as he’s concerned the ‘Mistakes’ we make at the youth level from a Speed & Agility Training perspective are:

 

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High School Strength Certification

IYCA High School Strength Certification

 

High School Strength Certification will be released tomorrow.

And today, I wanted to hit you with a few key points for your consideration…

 

Barrington High School

Timothy Christian

Prairie Ridge

 

3 of the numerous high schools I either worked at or consulted for from 2001 – 2009.

 

Without question the most fulfilling time of my career.

 

In those 8 years and with those 6,000+ high school athletes, I experienced more in the way of learning than at any other point in my 15 years inside this industry.

 

I learned that the situation (for multiple reasons) was never going to be ideal and that a practical system was necessary to optimally train these teenagers.

 

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Successful High School Training Systems

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

 

LIVE TONIGHT!!!

 

Eric Cressey

Mike Robertson

Wil Fleming

 

“The High School Training Systems Manifesto”

 

Everything you want to know about training high school training systems for athletes… From the best in the world!

 

NO CHARGE!

 


Register by clicking here —>  http://iyca.org/highschool/
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How to Create High School Training Systems

Before you read how I created a High School Training System that became one of the most successful in the country, I want to invite you to this landmark event:

 

Wednesday January 19
7:30pm (EST
)

 

“The High School Training Manifesto”

 

A LIVE audio with my special guests:

 

high school training

 

3 of the very best and most successful High School Strength Coaches in the world are going to share all their secrets with you…

 

Just click below and register for NO CHARGE:

 

 

—> http://iyca.org/highschool/

 

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Complete Athlete Development

Complete AThlete Development

 

 

The ‘Complete Athlete Development‘ System…

 

Now 100% Digital (So You Get IMMEDIATE ACCESS)

 

And Yours for Only $97

 

Click Here Right Now —>http://completeathletedevelopment.com/cad/digital

 

 

 

 

“When I read Brian’s ‘Speed & Movement Techniques’ chapter in his Complete Athlete Development Program, I knew that I was on to something very special…

 

… When I watched the corresponding DVD’s, I realized in an instance that the techniques and progressions he was showing were going to make my athletes the fastest and most agile in the game…

 

… I was right!”

 

I received that email from Heath Croll about 3 years ago.

 

My ‘Complete Athlete Development’ system was brand-new and I was anxious for feedback.

 

It’s one thing to coach successfully for 10 years, it’s another thing altogether to put your system on paper and ask people to believe in it.

 

But believe in it they did.

 

Fitness Professionals, Strength Coaches, High School Coaches – even Parents and Athletes!

 

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Endurance Training & Young Athletes

Young Athletes Endurance Training

Endurance training and young athletes is an often-misunderstood topic. On one hand, there are strength coaches who tend to disregard developmentally sound elements of endurance training in lieu of producing stronger and faster young athletes via strength and power type exercises exclusively. On the other hand, there are over-zealous coaches and trainers who equate endurance to long distance/duration activities, often with little regard for the athlete’s stage of development, ability or current level of conditioning.

 

Endurance can be defined quite simply as one’s ability to withstand fatigue or the ability to control the functional aptitude of movement while experiencing external stress. The latter definition lends itself well to the concept of athletic development and training young athletes. As I have stated many times in both print and lecture, when working with youngsters, the key ingredient to producing a successful training program is the ability to recognize that quality of execution is profoundly more important than quantity. Having said that, I still see coaches, trainers and parents opting for more difficult training sessions that include high volume or high intensity activities rather than concerning themselves with how correctly the exercise is being performed. Poor execution results in habitual patterns that are difficult to break and could result in injury. With respect to endurance training, proper mechanics are often compromised for higher volumes or intensities and this is very much a mistake.

 

One thing to consider is that the term ‘endurance’ has application to varying lengths and types of effort:

 

• Long slow distances – efforts of limited intensity but high distance or time

• Speed – efforts typically lasting 15 – 45 seconds with high levels of intensity but obviously limited time or distance

• Muscular – the ability to sustain a muscular contraction for a prolonged period of time

 

There are several factors to consider with respect to the development of endurance in young athletes:

 

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Prevent Overtraining for Young Athletes

 

 

Young Athletes Programming

In far too many situations throughout North America, strength coaches and personal trainers make common errors in their programming for young athletes, many of which can lead to overtraining syndromes –

 

Critical Analysis of Biomotor Ability

 

In working with young athletes, there is very little reason to ever ‘test’ their ability at certain lifts or speed variances. Your programming guidelines must be based around instilling proper execution of technique in your young athletes from a lift and movement economy standpoint. Having said that, gleaning 1, 3, 5 or 8 RM values on any particular exercise should be deemed a distant secondary consideration to teaching the proper values of form and function.

 

By using a ‘Teaching Model’ of exercise development rather than a ‘Training Model’ you are taking the pressure off of kids to reach for biomotor improvements at the expense of developing sound technique.

 

Changing Exercises to Often

 

Although when training adult clientele, there are neural advantages to altering your exercise selection often, with young athletes the reality is that the initial stages of training should comprise little more than dedicated time to teach and become proficient in the basics of lift and movement economy.

 

Far too often, trainers work to make young athlete routines challenging and neurally stimulating by incorporating complex programming and exercise selection into the mix early in the athletes’ training life. Resist the urge to make a neurological impact and instead, focus your efforts on developing sound competency in just a few basic lifts – the foundation you build during this time is paramount to eventually increasing both the volume and intricacy of your programming.

 

Consider the Athlete’s Entire Life

 

When creating a training program for a young athlete, you must take into consideration their entire life – that is, don’t just make training sessions hard for the sake of making them hard.

You do a disservice to the athlete and your business by following this practice.

 

For instance, if the young athlete is in-season for a particular sport, there practice and game schedule must be considered into the reality of your overall programming. Soccer practices, for instance four days per week coupled with one to two games per week, will leave any young athlete bordering on the verge of overtraining syndrome as it is. Your job during times like this is to augment them with restorative training that does not serve to push them lower beneath what would be considered normal and healthy biological levels.

 

Additionally, you must work to understand your young athletes’ eating and sleeping habits as well. Inappropriate nutrition and poor sleeping patterns (which many teenagers face today) are precursors to overtraining syndrome in that they are two of the more important restorative elements trainees can use to combat such concerns.

 

As a professional trainer working with young athletes, you are responsible and must assume accountability for their overall health and wellbeing. When training young athletes and in an effort to ensure quality, efficacy-based training practices, resist the temptation to do the ‘norm’ by making exercise sessions hard and physically challenging. Instead, follow the three key points above to ensure optimal training conditions and guard against the very real concerns of overtraining.

 

– Brian

 

 

Complete Athlete Development is the number #1 resource available that
shows you EXACTLY how to create cutting-edge training programs for young
athletes of all ages and for all sports, that will keep them progressing without
the concern of over-training.

 

strength training for young athletes

 

 

Increased Athletic Ability
Increased Speed and Agility
Increased Strength
Increased Weight Room Technique
Increased Flexibility and Mobility

 

 

 

 

Click Here to to see what athletes, parents, coaches and trainers worldwide have said about the Complete Athlete Development System