Archive for “speed training for young athletes” Tag

Conditioning vs. Speed Training

The Debate Over Conditioning Vs. Speed Training Continues

Much confusion abounds as to the differences between conditioning vs. speed training.

Track and field coaches generally classify speed training as many short, repetitive bouts of sprinting followed by ample periods of rest to allow for full recovery.

Repeated high-intensity efforts may, in fact, be the purest form of linear speed training.

On the other hand, football or soccer coaches often believe training for speed involves performing as many high-intensity repetitions as possible in a given amount of time.

So which type of coach is truly training athletes for speed?

Recently, I had the pleasure of attending a seminar featuring one of the premiere strength coaches in the country, Joe Kenn.

As head strength and conditioning coach for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League, Kenn routinely takes his players through 66 work sets in only 90 to 120 minutes.

That’s a lot of work in a short period of time.

Kenn has a strong case to apply this method. Because football players must operate under a fatigued state during a game, they will highly benefit from practicing with little rest between sets. While performing a high volume of repetitions in a relatively short period of time isn’t ideal for building speed, football players never perform in ideal conditions.

Nearly all athletes must learn to perform when their bodies are worn.

At my facility in Madison, WI, we train our high school athletes with a similar philosophy, although we often have access to them only once or twice per week. So, it’s important we incorporate both speed training and conditioning into each workout.

Because we deal with a wide range of athletic abilities and developmental ranges with high school athletes, we approach each individual’s plan a bit differently. We integrate speed training following a thorough warm-up and dynamic movement.

For the developmentally younger athletes, we focus on technique and practice deceleration patterns, sprint mechanics and footwork. Our developmentally older athletes work on sprinting, cutting, changing directions and building top-end speed.

Our highly developed athletes focus on reactive speed and potentially combine-based drills to prepare for a camp or tryout. All of these athletes work diligently to master the basics and fix any flaws in their movement patterns to help them remain injury-free and avoid plateaus.

Following the speed training portion of the workout, our athletes begin their strength exercises such as a squat, deadlift and Turkish get-up. Each compound movement is paired with another exercise even if it’s just low-level core work to reset an athlete’s autonomic nervous system.

If you look at time-motion studies for field- and court-sport athletes, they work intensely for brief periods of time and recover actively with low-level activity.

In a game, an athlete must always be mentally active, so the job of a strength and conditioning coach is to prepare athletes in a way that makes a game easier than a training session. Athletes must remain active through an entire workout. After our athletes complete the strength portion of the workout, they begin their focused conditioning. Here’s where we have the most fun.

Thanks to advancements in research of the anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, we are able to be much more efficient and systematic with how we condition our athletes. Athletes play different sports and have different schedules, so we must have a broad array of conditioning sequences to address each situation.

Ultimately, we are looking to provide a bigger aerobic base for our athletes.

While we don’t want to run them into the ground all year long, we must systematically build a bigger aerobic base to develop greater potential for performance. Then, athletes are able to tap into that potential during the most important part of a season. They’ll peak while athletes from other teams feel fatigued.

So, should we run our athletes through many short, repetitive bouts with ample rest to allow for full recovery or perform repeated high-intensity efforts without much rest for best results? In short, both have a place in a strength and conditioning program. The debate will continue, though—and that’s a great thing.

If more great coaches publicize their philosophies, we will continue to advance our methods and improve the performance of our athletes. If we continue to look out for the best interests of our athletes, they will perform better than they ever thought possible.

ADAPT and Conquer,
Coach Jared


About the Author: Jared Markiewicz

JarredJared is founder of Functional Integrated Training (F.I.T.). F.I.T. is a performance-based training facility located in Madison, WI. They specialize in training athletes of all levels: everyday adults, competitive adults and youth ages 5-20+.

The long-term vision for F.I.T. is recognition as the training facility for those desiring to compete at the collegiate level in the state of Wisconsin. Alongside that, to also develop a platform to educate those in our industry looking to make strides towards improving the future for our young athletes.

Find out more about Jared’s gym by visiting F.I.T.

Career Highlights

  • 2014 Fitness Entrepreneur of the Year – Fitness Business Insiders
  • 2014 IYCA Coach of the Year Finalist
  • Volunteer Strength Coach for West Madison Boys Hockey and Westside Boys Lacrosse
  • Helped develop dozens of scholarship athletes in 3 years of business
  • Instructed Kinesiology Lab at UW-Madison
  • Houses an internship program at F.I.T. that started in 2013
  • Member of Elite Mastermind Group of Nationwide Fitness Business Owners

 

Top 5 Summer Training Tips


Summer Youth Training 

I’ve been getting a lot of questions about how to approach summer training.

 
You’ve got a number of options, so here’s my take on getting the most out of summer youth training for sprinters (or any athlete in any sport, for that matter):

 

1

Consider not training at all.

 

Summer competitions are more popular in some places than others. Where I live, it’s not incredibly popular. And quite frankly, I’m cool with that.

 

I generally don’t steer kids toward summer training and/or competitions unless the kid is hardcore and keeps asking about it or they’re a scholarship caliber athlete who needs the work in a low pressure environment.

 

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Coaching Young Athletes Back in The Trenches: Part 2

Coaching Young Athletes – We learn from the Best…

 

(2) Coaching Presence

 

Yet another intuitive intangible that I truly believe cannot be taught… But CAN be improved upon so long as you’re prepared to look in the mirror…

 

A quality Coach has a presence. 

 

Not because they are dictators or aristocratic morons who feel compelled to proclaim their dominance, but because they simply have a commanding authority that is automatically respected and impossible to ignore when Coaching Young Athletes.

 

In my career, I have 3 Coaches who fit this bill perfectly  –

 

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Young Athlete Speed & Agility Development

Here is some fantastic and practical advice on how to create programs and drills that will make your young athletes quicker and more agile…

 

 

Young Athlete Speed & Agility Training Made Easy:

Click Here —> http://CompleteAthleteDevelopment.com/

 

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How to Assess Young Athletes

Do you ever ‘test’ your Young Athletes?

 

Their speed?

 

Strength?

 

Flexibility?

 

If so, why?

 

You know, most Coaches and Trainers can’t answer that question.

 

They test because they think they’re supposed to.

 

That they need to in order to show ‘results’.

 

But there are other reasons…

 

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Early Sport Specialization: Part 1


Sport Specialization

Sport Specialization Vs LTAD

 

The IYCA has championed the notion that the long-term athletic development model, or LTAD, provides the greatest benefit to a developing athlete, in both physical and psychological aspects, over time. 

 

Contrary to ever-popular and growing model of early sport specialization, the LTAD model is intended to optimize performance slowly and equip the young athlete with foundational skills. 

 

Although far from “new,” in light of heavily marketed programs intended to maximize immediate potential sport specific gains, the commonsense simplicity of the LTAD model is starting to gain momentum with some practitioners.

 

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Youth Soccer Training: Part 1

Youth Soccer Training Success

For Soccer Coaches and Youth Fitness Specialists:

 

Watch This:

 

 

 

 

Soccer Speed Training ==> http://CompleteAtheteDeveopment.com

 

… Actually, This Works for ALL Youth Sports not just youth soccer training:

 

A Step-By-Step Blueprint for Making Young Athletes Faster

 

==> http://CompleteAtheteDeveopment.com

 

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Youth Fitness Business Top 4 Tips for 2011: Part 1

So here is my ‘Top 4 youth fitness business tips for 2011′ wish list:

1. Look At What Everyone Else is Doing… And Do the Opposite (more…)

Speed Training for Young Athletes – Part 2


Speed Training

 

“What are the most important elements of Speed Training to teach when working with young athletes?”

 

That’s the first question I answered in ‘Part 2’ of my interrogation with Latif Thomas…

 

LISTEN RIGHT NOW:

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Speed Training for Young Athletes – Part 1


Young Athletes

 

World-renowned Speed Coach, Latif Thomas, asked me to answer questions live on an internationally broadcasted conference call.

 

He allowed his audience to email any questions they had for me.

 

Roughly 100 questions came pouring in that night….

 

LISTEN RIGHT NOW:

 

 

Want to Know My Complete and Uncensored Training System for Making Your Young Athletes Fast?

 

Click Here Right Now —> http://CompleteAthleteDevelopment.com/

 

– Brian

 

 

How To Shape Speed Training – Part 2

 

 

Speed Training

A coach or trainer must possess a firm grasp of applied pedagogical science and have the ability to convert that knowledge into its practical art form.

 

Gone are the days of the ‘one size fits all’ approach to working with athletes. You cannot assume nor expect a given group of athletes, with their varying personalities and temperaments, to relate and respond to a singular style of coaching.

 

The aristocratic and authoritarian coaching style, long considered the most effective means of handling a group of athletes, is in actuality, a surefire way to negate the potential benefits of a lesson or training session.

 

From an ease of coaching perspective, it would be a wonderful scenario for us to only to work with those athletes whom were supremely motivated and exceptionally gifted, but in reality, this is seldom the case.

 

In any given group setting you have to accept the notion that your athletes will be divided in terms of both ability and motivation, and represent an eclectic cross-section of the following potential personalities:

 

– High Motivation/High Skill
– High Motivation/Low Skill
– Low Motivation/ High Skill
– Low Motivation/Low Skill

 

Each one of the sub-classifications above represents an athlete in need of a particular coaching style in order to gain and retain your speed and movement shaping lessons optimally.

 

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3 Keys to Successful Speed Camps

 

 

Speed Camps Revenue

Before I get into the 3 Keys to successful speed camps, I wanted to tell you that after much deliberation we’ve decided to give you access the online version of the closed door Workshop that Pat Rigsby and I did on running Profitable Speed Camps & Clinics when you order the Youth Speed Specialist Certification before tomorrow at 3pm.

 

This was previously only available to people who attended the webinar this past Monday, but we’ve decided that this information is too powerful to exclude those that couldn’t attend the webinar.

 

So you can grab the Youth Speed & Agility Specialist Certification *and* online access to the Running Profitable Speed Camps & Clinics Workshop here:

 

—-> www.YouthSpeedSpecialist.com

 

In the Youth Speed & Agility Specialist Certification, Lee Taft and I give you a lot  more than just information on training athletes to be faster.

 

We also reveal our complete system for running successful and profitable Speed Camps.

 

Something we have both had tremendous success with over the years.

 

So, here are our Top 3 Keys that will help you understand how to make  your Speed Camps the most on-demand program in your area:

 

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Youth Speed Certification – Your Questions Answered

 

 

Youth Speed Certification

 

While thousands of people worldwide have already taken advantage of the “$100 Off” discount I’ve offered you on my new Speed & Agility Specialist Certification, hundreds more have been emailing in some specific questions about the course itself.

 

So, I decided it would be a good idea to get you some answers.

 

 

1.) Is the Youth Speed & Agility Specialist Certification Right For Me?

 

Great question and easy answer…

 

If you work with young athletes or youth fitness participants in anyway, than 100% YES!!

 

Strength & Conditioning Coaches

Fitness Professionals

Youth Fitness Specialists

Youth Sports Coaches

 

The information that Lee and I put together is both easy to follow and incredibly practical.

 

You will gain a new and exciting look at how to make athletes faster and be able to implement our internationally proven systems virtually overnight.

 

We explain each and every concept of our system in complete detail in the Youth Speed Certification which makes it a perfect resource for seasoned industry veterans, new members of the fitness industry as well as sport Coaches who simply want to make their teams and athletes faster.

 

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Fitness Programs For Kids: Top 3 Keys To Speed Training

 

 

Fitness Programs For Kids

Fitness Programs For Kids speed training for young athletes
International superstar Speed Coach Lee Taft and I agree on almost everything related to training athletes.

 

Together, we have found through our combined 40 years of experience that these are the 3 most important factors to a successful speed training program –

 

 

Speed Key #1 – Create a Developmental System
Training for speed has to be developmental in nature.

 

With younger athletes (6 – 9 years old) training for speed is a matter of allowing kids to explore various aspects of movement from a self-learning perspective.

 

As a Coach or Trainer, your objective is to create games and drills that provide a broad-base of multi-directional movement (i.e. forward, backwards) as well as timing-oriented skills (i.e. skipping to a specific cadence).

 

It is important to resist the urge to ‘over-teach’ or ‘make perfect’ the way your youngsters are performing these skills.

 

Young nervous systems must be given the opportunity to learn through a trial and error process, what quality movement feels like.

 

With athletes 10 – 18, your training efforts can become much more teaching based and focus will shift to perfection of movement habits and eventually ‘drilling’ (i.e. repetitive sets of specific skills).

 

Do not be fooled into thinking that young athletes and more mature athletes can learn the skills associated with speed & agility in the same way, however.

 

A developmental system is necessary for optimal speed & agility training.

 

Our new Youth Speed & Agility Specialist Certification contains the complete developmental process that Lee and I have used successfully for nearly 4 decades.

 

—> Click here for an example of that system

 

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Coaching Young Athletes Too Much or Not Enough?

 

 

Coaching Young Athletes

I have long contended that too much coaching when it comes to working
with very young athletes is far worse than not enough instruction.

 

Give them ideas of what it is you want.

 

Offer more instruction if they need it.

 

And then let them play.

 

Allow them to figure it out.

 

This process builds Athletic Intelligence and gives very young athletes the
ability to warehouse knowledge through a trial and error sort of way.

 

Do you agree?

 

Disagree and want to explain why?

 

Please watch this two minute video during which I explain how to correctly be
Coaching Young Athletes the process of deceleration.

 

Give it a watch and leave your comments below. I really want to know your
thoughts on the matter.

 

 

At this past February’s International Summit, I, along with ten of the most
well-known and gifted Youth Fitness Specialists in the world, offered information
about training, nutrition and business during a 3-day event that has been called
"One of the Best Fitness Events Ever"

 

::Dr. Kwame Brown – The Art of Play
:: Pat Rigsby – Marketing for a Youth Fitness Business
:: Nick Berry – Business Systems for Youth Fitness
:: Carlo Alvarez – Creating Championship High School Programs
:: Dr. Chris Mohr – Nutrition for the Young Athlete
:: Lee Taft – Speed & Agility Training

 

Click Here Now to witness this landmark event for yourself

 

Youth Speed Training Myths

 

 

Youth Speed Training success

Training young athletes for speed is a topic that I love to chat about.

 

Mostly, because I learn from a variety of sources.

 

What’s your philosophy on speed training?

 

Deceleration first?

 

Systemic strength as a base?

 

Multiple parts of different kinds of stimulus?

 

I love to learn from IYCA Members worldwide and would be honored if
you would click on the link below and share with me your thoughts
on Youth Speed Training

 

So, what say you about speed training, my friend?

 

Please…. Leave your thoughts and comments below –

 

Youth Athletic Development Coaching For Speed – A Lost Art

What you’re about to see is one of the final phases of a system for

teaching speed and agility to improve youth athletic development.

 

You start youth athletic development by Introducing ‘Skill Sets’.

 

You then Teach ‘Deceleration Techniques’ through the Principles
of Movement.

 

You then Integrate these techniques into a functional and
specific format.

 

It is progressive and systems oriented.

 

And it works.

 

Notice how I coach as my athletes are working.

 

I stop to show and explain what was right and what was wrong.

 

Coaching is an art.

 

It is a never ending process of correction and affirmation in youth athletic development.

 

Here’s that video –

 

 

 

 

Crisp, clean and direct.

 

Now that is the culmination of a progressive speed training system.

 

 

1) Introduce
2) Teach
3) Integrate

 

 

It doesn’t get easier than that and yet still, very few Coaches and Trainers do it right.

 

I’m not going to bother you with ‘testimonials’ or a ‘sales ad’ here.

 

Just click the link below and look hard at my Complete Athlete Development system.

 

The ‘How To’ for developing young athletes from 6 – 18 years old.

 

Including this Speed and Agility progressive system.

 

With a guaranteed money back stipulation, you have absolutely nothing
to lose.

 

Here’s your exclusive link –

 


Complete Athlete Development – Click Here and See For Yourself

 

 

Brian

 

Training Young Athletes Speed – The Success Keys

Training Young Athletes Speed Is not all about making them sweat.

 

It’s about making them better.

 

It’s not about making young athletes tired.

 

It’s about teaching them so they become more effective.

 

A lot of my training system isn’t ‘sexy’.

 

It’s not the ‘cool, new, funky’ stuff that looks impressive.

 

But it works.

 

And it builds rock solid athletes every time.

 

Here’s that training young athletes speed video clip: