Archive for “Spectrum” Tag

Getting Your High School Athletes Faster

 

 

by Wil Fleming

 

The biggest mistake in training athletes to get faster.

 

 

Both speed and agility are critically important for athletes to be successful on the field. Unfortunately I see plenty of programs or services offered by coaches that are skewed in the wrong direction, they promise to "decrease your 40 time" or "drop your home to first time".  While both of these things are important in the recruitment of athletes, they are not critically important to the performance of athletes.  Training speed and agility in some cases, verges on running some sprints and breaking out the agility ladder.

 

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Sport Specific Youth Training: Part 1

Insert/edit linkYouth Training

For Sports

As a given sport evolves and the participants within that sport begin to break records and perform what was once considered impossible, you can be sure that advancements in training and conditioning regimes have occurred within that sport. Very few athletes ever become great sport technicians without the inclusion of a comprehensive athletic development and conditioning program as part of their training package. Over the past decade, the type of training and conditioning performed by young, developing and elite athletes has gone from basic fitness to more functionally- based and developmental activities. Figure skating and all of the disciplines under that umbrella are such examples.

 

Youth Training

 

For example, many training coaches prescribe that their skaters practice landing jumps and performing balance based skills (such as spirals) off the ice. On the other side of the spectrum, there are the ‘athletic developers’ who tend not to concern themselves with producing specified strength gains but instead work more directly at improving the complete athletic profile of the skater. The general conception among these professionals is that the greater degree of athleticism the skater has, the more likely he or she will be able to carry out athletic skills. While traditionalists often incorporate basic and conventional exercises into their training programs, the athletic developers come from a more movement based perspective. This style of conditioning is often referred to as ‘functional’ training, which is in fact a misnomer. Let’s examine that.

 

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IYCA: Thank You and A Gift From Me

IYCA Provides…

by Wil Fleming – www.beforcefit.com

 

It is the week of Thanksgiving and I wanted to share with you why I am thankful for the IYCA.

 

Certainly I am thankful for the knowledge I gain from attending live events and the continuing education certification courses but that only touches the surface.  The IYCA gives away, literally gives away, so much valuable information. All of it for free.   The IYCA treats its members like family.  I am thankful for being a part of an organization that wants me to be able to do what I love better than any other professional around.

 

As members of the IYCA we are all passionate about the training of our youth.  Some are passionate about reducing the prevalence of obesity in our youth, others want to help athletes succeed to their highest levels.  Wherever you fall on this spectrum there is one thing that will determine your success.

 

Your ability to reach as many young people as possible. 

 

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Kids Coaching: My Memories – Part 3

 

 

Kids Coaching Triumphs

Justin was overweight, shy, awkward and without a shred of athletic
ability.

 

But he had a ton of passion.

 

Loved baseball.

 

And I mean loved everything about the game.

 

You could see the delight in his eyes and practically feel the joy
in his smile when he slid his glove on, picked up a Louisville
Slugger or laced up his cleats.

 

This was the kind of kid you flat out just enjoyed being around.

 

Not because he brought a tremendous amount of vocal energy to
the field, but because of the way he walked around a baseball
diamond in a trance-like, dream state that conveyed absolute bliss.

 

And what he taught me about coaching was, and is to this day,
one of the most important lessons I have ever had the pleasure
of learning.

 

Justin went from the shy kid who didn’t really have any friends on
his team, to a hero.

 

And he did it all by himself…

 

I won’t belabor this story or add too much in the way of detail.

 

I’ll just get straight to the point by saying this –

 

 

Every Child Has Currency

 

 

They’re all important.

 

They all have hopes, dreams and ambitions.

 

And most importantly…

 

They’re all good at something.

 

Part of the Art of Coaching is knowing how to create enough
of a wide-spectrum training system that allows each and everyone
of your young athletes to be "the best" on a particular day.

 

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