Archive for “professional athletes” Tag

Youth Training By Eric Cressey

Eric Cressey youth training

Youth Training Done right 

Last November, a good buddy of mine who is a very accomplished college strength coach came up to Boston for a seminar we put organized on a Sunday.  He actually flew up Friday night so that he could observe on Saturday while we trained our clients – which was a nice blend of youth training, high school, college, and professional athletes, plus our adult clientele.  All told, I’d say that high school athletes are 70% of our clientele.

 

That Tuesday morning, I woke up to this email from him:

 

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Pro Athletes & Youth Conditioning

Here are your updates to www.IYCAMembers.com for the week of August 30, 2010

 

 

1) AUDIO – HOW PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES ARE AFFECTED BY YOUTH CONDITIONING & TRAINING

 

Our newest IYCAMembers.com Columnist is the incredible, Sue Falsone.

 

Sue is the Head Physical Therapist for Athletes Performance, a Speaker on the Perform Better Tour and the PT for Major League Baseball’s, Los Angeles Dodgers.

 

Quite the pedigree!

 

In this interview, Sue explains the role of Youth Athlete Development Training and its impact she sees everyday with elite, professional athletes.

 

Quality training at the youth level is necessary… And Sue is going to tell you why:
youth conditioning

 

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Professional Athletes & Youth Nutrition?

Youth Nutrition Importance

youth Nutrition

 

The Kansas City Chiefs.

 

Washington Red Skins, Kansas City Royals, Golden State Warriors, San Jose Sharks and University of Louisville… Not to mention Men’s Health, the Discovery Channel and Under Armor.

 

That’s a short list of the professional sports teams, institutions and multi-media organizations who think Dr. Chris Mohr is ‘top dog’ when it comes to nutrition.

 

 

And that’s precisely why I hand-picked him to create the IYCA’s “youth nutrition Specialist” certification course.

 

 

Scientifically sound nutrition strategies that when implemented will improve athletic performance

 

Reinforce effective nutrition teaching tools to provide children and adolescents with a solid youth nutrition foundation

 

The most current recommendations for nutrient intake – for macro and micro nutrients and fluids – and more importantly, how to apply these recommendations to our daily lives.

 

16 done for you nutrition handouts – from Power Fuel Snack Ideas to Hydration

 

Charts and Nutrition for Tournament Play, and many more – all to make your already busy routine a little less stressful

 

6 simple strategies to make informed decisions about dietary supplements

 

And that’s just a sample of what you get in this certification course… Not to mention you also earn a prized certification that will set you apart from virtually every other Trainer or Coach in your area (“insert your name here” – Certified Youth Nutrition Specialist).

 

This no-risk offer expires in a couple of days…

 

Click Here Now —> http://iyca.org/Nutrition/

 

 

‘Til next time,

 

Brian

 

 

P.S. Just to recap:

 

$14.95 (shipping) down

 

$75 per month for 4 months

 

Fuel Like a Champion – FREE BONUS ($34.99 value)

 

Return the material at any time within 365 days for a full refund

 

Keep the digital version of “Fuel Like a Champion”

 

Click Here Now —> http://iyca.org/Nutrition/

 

 

Young Athletes & Coordination – Part 3

Young Athletes & Coordination Series

Here is the third and final portion of ‘Young Athletes & Coordination’:

 

(3) Teenage Athletes Are ‘Too Old’

 

Now, while there is truth to the matter that many of the sensitive periods for coordination development lay during the preadolescent phase of life, it would be shortsighted to suggest that teenage athletes should not be exposed to this type of training.

 

Firstly, much of the training of coordination takes the form of injury preventative.  Any sort of ‘balance’ exercise, for example, requires proprioceptive conditioning and increases in stabilizer recruitment.  With ‘synchronization of movement’, large ROM and mobility work is necessary.  ‘Kinesthetic differentiation’, by definition, involves sub-maximal efforts or ‘fine-touch’ capacity which is a drastically different stimulus than most young athletes are used to in training settings.

 

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