Archive for “Perspective” Tag

Training Young Athletes: Are You Coaching an Entitled Child?

 

Motivating When Training Young Athletes

Training young athletes IYCA youth fitness specialist

 

By Melissa Lambert

 

As coaches you can all think of a time when a parent or young athlete has approached you demanding they start and play the entire game. Whether they deserve that level of recognition or not, in their eyes they will be a professional athlete some day and the expectation is that you cater to their needs. One of the most difficult aspects of coaching can be motivating young athletes to compete at peak performance not only as individuals but as a team. Conversely, when you have young athletes who feel entitled and need to be in the limelight all the time, you can expect a bigger challenge. An entitled child or athlete feels like he or she should receive without giving and working. This child often refuses to hear the word no and will lash out. Other signs of entitlement include not taking turns, impatience, putting themselves first, lack of compassion, tantrums and minimal manners.

 

These childhood or adolescent behaviors are not innate; they have been shaped by their environment. They are a result of over-parenting and giving children too much without earning it. Coaches can only foster the environment during the time in which they are working with the athletes, however they still play a critical role in overall physical and emotional development. The problem with giving children everything they want is building false expectations that needs and desires will be at the center of future relationships whether it would be with friends, coaches, teachers or a significant other. If you put into the perspective of a high school athlete, how might he or she handle getting beat out of a position by their own teammate? The entitled athlete will come up with a million excuses for why they deserve to be playing and will quit the team instead of fighting for that position back.

 

The number of children with high skill and low motivation I see when training young athletes is increasing and the philosophy of coaching our current generation of youth needs to change in developing future elite athletes.

 

Coaches need to be mindful not to set-up athletes to fail by giving them the preconceived notion they will become the next all-star young athlete in order to meet their desired outcome.

 

What you need to know to about coaching and training young athletes:

 

Over-coaching hurts a child’s confidence and underestimates an athlete’s ability.

 

It’s a similar concept to over-parenting when your role is to provide the necessities without over indulging. Athletes need opportunities to learn for themselves and make their own mistakes. It is easy to find yourself catering to a child who always seems to have a problem whether it’s pain, hunger or needing a water break every 10 minutes. Make sure you set firm expectations and limits from the beginning and make team values a precedence. If an athlete shows up late to practice they should know ahead of time what the consequence is. You should also encourage your athletes to problem-solve their own questions or challenges rather than doing it for them. This allows for autonomy and exploration. Trust that your athletes can handle a difficult situation independently or as a team while providing guidance when needed.

 

Focus on the resilience of an athlete – their ability to cope with stress and adversity.

 

It’s much easier to say no to an athlete with a mind set that he or she will become a stronger individual in the long run. I am sure we can all think of an athlete that cracks under pressure or loses composure at the thought of failure. A child or athlete who is entitled tends to lack resiliency, which frequently results in poor performance in challenging situations. Create opportunities through competition and teach the importance of responsibility in growth. In order to affect change when training young athletes, an athlete needs to take ownership and acknowledge a change needs to be made. The more athletes are put in difficult situations during practice, scrimmages, etc. the greater their ability to handle adversity in a game situation. Use narcissism, giving-up and low motivation as teaching tools during practice to break out of habits while positively reinforcing appropriate behaviors through praise or additional playing time.

 

Don’t reward or compliment children for unfitting attributes.

 

Studies indicate that children who are complimented for everything don’t benefit from being positively reinforced by praise. You build false hope in an athlete if you tell them they are doing well at something when they are not. This will result in a greater sense of disappointment later in life when reality sets in. Coaches need to teach young athletes that mistakes are necessary to become better and use weaknesses as coaching opportunities for improvement. Don’t make athletes feel like they need to be exceptional all the time by using unsubstantiated appraisals.

 

Coaches are not only an intricate part of athletic development but also help build a foundation for everyday life skills. It is crucial to allow for autonomy and avoid doing everything for your young athletes. They need to be able to handle adversity and effectively cope when challenges arise. Most importantly when training young athletes, encourage them to build off weaknesses instead of giving false hop resulting in future disappointment.

 

Melissa Lambert, M.Ed, LPC, YFS1, HSSCC, YNS
Child and Adolescent Therapist
Program Director – Connecticut Coast Soccer Performance Training Clinic

 

 

Evaluating Yourself As A Coach

 

Become The Best Coach You Can Be

youth coach evaluation

By Wil Fleming

 

There are a lot of great coaches in the world, and this newsletter reaches plenty of them. To become an even better coach evaluation is really important.

I think that coaching breaks down into four categories and seeing where you are an expert or could need some work is a helpful tool to become a better a coach.

 

  1. Anatomy and Kinesiology 

    This category is first as it is likely the first thing we learned in school that actually pertained to our development as coaches. For coaches that changed careers or don’t have a classic background in this area, this is typically the weakest. Coaches that are strong in this area, can do wonders in assessment, analyzing movements, and innovating new ideas.

     

    This is by far my weakest area and something that I strive to get better in everyday. Brushing up on anatomy, kinesiology, and biomechanics through reading is my primary way to get better in this area.

     

  2. Program design 

    Designing great programs can really make your athletes better. Putting the wrong exercises in the program can make your athletes unprepared for their competitions, or even get them injured. Incorrect rep schemes and volume can leave your athletes under or over trained. The right program can give each athlete a chance at giving their best effort when it counts.

     

    I think that I am fairly strong in this area, but could definitely use improvement. The easiest way to improve in this area is to observe and interact with coaches that are preparing athletes on a daily basis and glean what you can from their programming secrets.

     

  3. Practical Coaching 

    Practical coaching is what I have named the actual coaching on the floor. Seeing movements and cleaning them up to get the best patterns possible. Being a problem solver on the floor coaching the technique at every step.

     

    In my perspective, this is where I am strongest. I am able to identify issues in movements and make the modifications on the floor or to the technique that are necessary. Again watching good coaches in action is a great way to improve in this area, as is completing the movements yourself. Working through your own technical problems is a great way to get a feel for what you need to coach.

     

  4. Impact 

    Impact is all of the non-programming stuff. Are you making the environment fun? Are you setting the athletes up for life-long success by associating positive emotions with training?

     

    Also one of my strong suits, but probably the area in which I worry about the most. I want to make sure that the athletes love the experience and are excited to train. To improve in this area there are no secrets, it is always making sure that your energy is higher than the athletes’ energy and focusing on bringing them up with you through their training session.

     

Don’t be afraid to evaluate, and don’t be afraid to focus in on your weak points. You as a coach and your athletes will get better because of it.

 

Change Lives,

 

Wil

 

 

The Young Athlete Who Changed My Life

 

 

Young Athlete Who Changed My Life

This story is going to change your day.

 

It may even change your perspective permanently.

 

I’m going to tell you about Tom – the young athlete who changed my life.

 

Exactly 7 years, 3 months and 5 days into my career as an Athletic Development Specialist, Tom walked into my training center with his Mom.

 

I had been prompted on the phone the week before.

 

"Tom had an accident when he was a child" I was told by Tom’s mother.

 

"He is a very bright boy, but the brain trauma he experienced has left him very uncoordinated and lacking some basic motor skills".

 

I wasn’t concerned. I had worked with young people just like this before and had always found that my brand of coordination-focused athletic development was perfect for re-instilling certain degrees of normal function.

 

As I watched Tom walk in with his Mom, nothing in particular seemed or looked too out of sorts.

 

Tom walked with a slight limp and his left arm rested at his side rather than moving in unison with his walking gait.

 

He looked a little nervous and unsure and I could see that he had rounded shoulders and a slight external rotation to his right hip (what can I say… I assess athletes right from the time they walk in the door!).

 

(more…)

How To Shape Speed Training – Part 2

 

 

Speed Training

A coach or trainer must possess a firm grasp of applied pedagogical science and have the ability to convert that knowledge into its practical art form.

 

Gone are the days of the ‘one size fits all’ approach to working with athletes. You cannot assume nor expect a given group of athletes, with their varying personalities and temperaments, to relate and respond to a singular style of coaching.

 

The aristocratic and authoritarian coaching style, long considered the most effective means of handling a group of athletes, is in actuality, a surefire way to negate the potential benefits of a lesson or training session.

 

From an ease of coaching perspective, it would be a wonderful scenario for us to only to work with those athletes whom were supremely motivated and exceptionally gifted, but in reality, this is seldom the case.

 

In any given group setting you have to accept the notion that your athletes will be divided in terms of both ability and motivation, and represent an eclectic cross-section of the following potential personalities:

 

– High Motivation/High Skill
– High Motivation/Low Skill
– Low Motivation/ High Skill
– Low Motivation/Low Skill

 

Each one of the sub-classifications above represents an athlete in need of a particular coaching style in order to gain and retain your speed and movement shaping lessons optimally.

 

(more…)

Coordination and Movement Skill Development For Young Athletes: The Key to Long Term Athletic Success

 

 

Young Athletes Long Term Athletic Success

The key ingredient to working with pre-adolescent and early adolescent young athletes is providing global stimulation from a movement perspective. Younger athletes must experience and eventually perfect a variety of motor skills in order to ensure both future athletic success and injury prevention. Developing basic coordination through movement stimulus is a must, with the eventual goal of developing sport-specific coordination in the teenage years. Coordination itself, however, is a global system made up of several synergistic elements and not necessarily a singularly defined ability.

 

Balance, rhythm, spatial orientation and the ability to react to both auditory and visual stimulus have all been identified as elements of coordination. In fact, the development of good coordination is a multi-tiered sequence that progresses from skills performed with good spatial awareness but without speed to skills performed at increased speeds and in a constantly changing environment. As Joseph Drabik points out, Young Athletes coordination is best developed between the ages of 7 – 14, with the most crucial period being between 10 – 13 years of age.

 

As with anything else, an important issue with respect to coordination development is to provide stimulus that is specific (and therefore appropriate) for the individual. Prescribing drills that are either too easy or too difficult for the young athletes will have a less than optimal result.

 

An interesting note, as I have suggested in past articles, is that there appears to be a cap with respect to coordination development and ability. Younger athletes who learn to master the elements associated with good coordination (balance, rhythm, spatial awareness, reaction etc), are far better off then athletes who are not exposed to this kind of exercise stimulation until advanced ages. The ability to optimally develop coordination ends at around the age of 16. This validates the claim that global, early exposure is the key from an athletic development standpoint. Again, global coordination will serve as the basis to develop specific coordination in the teenage years.

 

(more…)

Youth Fitness Industry Problems: I Need Your Input

 

 

What’s the biggest problem you see in youth fitness and sports training?

 

I want to know.

 

Your perspective will help shape the IYCA Mission.

 

So please, leave a comment below and share with me your thoughts on the state of youth fitness

 

IYCA International Summit: A Life Changing Event…

 

 

IYCA International Summit DVD’s are almost ready.

 

I’m about 4 or 5 days away from being able to let you get your hands
on what has been called "one of the greatest fitness events ever."

 

And that’s why I’m able now to show you this short video.

 

25 year industry vet and international fitness legend, Billy Corbit, gave
the keynote introduction at my first annual IYCA International Summit.

 

The passion, energy, emotion and dedication is absolutely palpable.

 

Watch and see exactly what I’ve been telling you about –

 

 

"I just wanted to let you know that the IYCA Summit was by far
one of the very best fitness conferences I’ve ever attended. Thank
you so much for everything you’ve done to create the IYCA and
also for presenting such a fabulous weekend of incredible speakers!
During the two days, I learned so much about youth fitness and it has
truly given me a new and very real perspective on my fitness coaching.
As others have said, the Summit truly was life-changing!"

 

– Doretta Reily (Summit Attendee)

 

 

IYCA International Summit DVD’s are coming soon…

 

 

Training Teaching And Coaching Young Athletes

 


 

Coaching Young Athletes

Do you Teach or Train and deliver great coaching young athletes?

 

If you are like most coaches and trainers I am familiar with, you likely ‘train’ your athletes as a means to elicit biomotor improvement.

 

You work on various forms of sprints and jumping in order to develop ‘blazing speed’.

 

You lift weights or perform bodyweight exercises to increase ‘mammoth strength’.

 

You set out cones and have your young athletes practice elaborate movement drills as a way of improving their ‘stealth-like agility’.

 

These types of exercises in themselves are not problematic or bad per say…

 

But they are only quasi-beneficial and extremely narrow-scoped if you aren’t looking to teach your young athletes the skills they need to perform these drills and set them up to improve on the next level.

(more…)

The Young Athlete That Changed My Life

 

 

Young Athlete Inspires His Coach…

This story is going to change your day.

 

It may even change your perspective permanently.

 

I’m going to tell you about Tom – the young athlete who changed my life.

 

Exactly 7 years, 3 months and 5 days into my career as an Athletic Development Specialist, Tom walked into my training center with his Mom.

 

I had been prompted on the phone the week before.

 

“Tom had an accident when he was a child” I was told by Tom’s mother.

 

“He is a very bright boy, but the brain trauma he experienced has left him very uncoordinated and lacking some basic motor skills”.

 

I wasn’t concerned.  I had worked with young people just like this before and had always found that my brand of coordination-focused athletic development was perfect for re-instilling certain degrees of normal function.

 

As I watched Tom walk in with his Mom, nothing in particular seemed or looked too out of sorts.

 

Tom walked with a slight limp and his left arm rested at his side rather than moving in unison with his walking gait.

 

He looked a little nervous and unsure and I could see that he had rounded shoulders and a slight external rotation to his right hip (what can I say… I assess athlete’s right from the time they walk in the door!).

 

“Brian?  Nice to meet you – this is my son, Tom”

 

“Hey Tom, what’s going on?” I asked as I stretched out my hand.

 

“Not much” Tom said sheepishly, as he looked straight down at the floor and extended his right hand.

 

“Let’s get started” I said

 

I was looking at Tom’s mother.

 

“We’re going to start with…”

 

Tom’s mother cut me off.

 

“I’m not staying.  Tom insisted that he wanted to work with you on his own – no interference or observing from me.  You just let me know about when you will be done for the day and I’ll be back to pick him up”

 

“Well this is just out initial assessment, so we’ll only need about 30 minutes”

 

“Fine, I’ll be back by then” Tom’s mother said as she walked towards the door to my facility.

 

The briskness of her departure startled me.  I immediately turned to Tom for some kind of explanation or clarification.

 

But there he stood, looking straight down – exactly the same as he was when we shook hands.

 

For the next 30 minutes, I worked with Tom on basic movement skills.  First, I would ask him to perform things like skipping exercises, linear and lateral acceleration drills and some throwing games.

 

I began to ascertain some standard abnormal patterns of movement that Tom had, and worked at correcting some of the ways in which he performed basic motor skills.

 

As was my style back then, I was coaching Tom in my customary upbeat and loud way – I prided myself on being a positive coach who could always be heard over the din and hubbub in the rest of my facility.

 

I say ‘back then’ because I’m writing this story almost five years to the day that first met Tom… this time of year always makes me remember him.

 

As the weights clanged and the other young athlete got louder, I always made it a point to be heard above all the other noise – that’s what good coaches do. 

 

They remain consistent in their coaching style no matter what… or so I thought.

 

If only I knew then what I have come to know now.

 

“Here we go, Tom.  Just like that.  Perfect!” I was practically yelling at this point in sheer excitement to see what Tom and I had been able to do together in just one 30-minute session.

 

Then, something out of the blue hit me.

 

Tom was barely talking. 

 

He was polite and certainly listened to my instructions – you could tell that from the way his movement patterns had become more crisp and clean.

 

But I was clearly more happy and excited about his improvements than he was.

 

Being the caring Coach that I am, I decided to investigate.

 

“Things are looking awesome, Tom!” I declared in my usual loud pitch.

 

“Ya” Tom countered while looking down

 

“If you don’t mind me asking, why don’t you seem more excited about that?”

 

“I am” he insisted, “It’s just the way your yelling at me – It’s kind of making me nervous”

 

His words hit me like a racecar going 150…

 

…So much so that I had to stop myself from declaring my innocence to this 15-year-old kid.

 

I decided to probe instead.

 

“How do you mean I’m yelling at you, Tom?”

 

“You know.  You keep raising your voice and calling instructions out to me in a loud way”

 

But this is the way I coach, I thought to myself.  I always prided myself on being the kind of coach that all my athletes could actually hear… even in the middle of a loud, crowded gym.

 

“So, when you hear me raise my voice, you feel as though I am speaking negatively towards you?” I asked uncertainly

 

“Ya… of course” Tom explained.

 

Just then, Tom’s mother came back.  Our 30-minute session was over.

 

I shook Tom’s hand again, thanked him for doing such a great job and made an appointment later than week to see him again.

 

Tom walked out of my gym exactly the way he had walked in – with his head down and looking kind of nervous.

 

The story doesn’t end there.

 

I trained Tom for another 3 full years and watched him go 0 – 22 in his high school wrestling career.

 

For many, that would have been considered an awful experience, but for Tom, and everyone who knew him, it was nothing short of miraculous.

 

Here was this teenager with significant motor skills impairments, a limp and various other structural abnormalities, joining the high school wrestling team where he and everyone else knew that he was bound to ‘lose’ every match – but he didn’t care.

 

Tom was a fighter.

 

I suppose it makes sense to end the story there, doesn’t it?

 

Tom’s courage, tenacity and determination have impacted me to this day.

 

In fact, I can honestly say that my life will never be the same after watching Tom do what he did during the 3-years that I trained him.

 

This article is about how Tom changed my life, and I have certainly explained one part of how that happened.

 

But the ‘rest of the story’ is something even more important.

 

Tom taught me how to coach.

 

That sounds funny doesn’t it?

 

I mean, when I met Tom, I had already trained Olympic Champions, Professional Athletes and traveled throughout Europe and North America as the Conditioning Director for National Team programs.

 

I had coached A LOT of athletes – and felt like I knew what I was doing.

 

But the real impact Tom had on my life was when he taught me that not all athletes like to be coached the same way.

 

I was always positive, upbeat and excited for my athletes.

 

That was how I coached.

 

But Tom didn’t like being coached like that – when he heard my voice raise, all he processed was that I was ‘yelling’ at him.

 

And it made me think.

 

How many athletes ‘process’ what you say in a completely different way than they way you had intended them to hear it?

 

Because of Tom, I created my ‘Art of Coaching template’, which is a categorization of athletes based on their personality and temperament.

 

It requires no extensive assessments or surveys, just a subjective analysis that allows you to classify your athletes into one of 4 very unique and very critical coaching templates.

 

From there, you will know exactly how to coach each athlete in order to get the very best out of them you possibly can.

 

I had it wrong for so many years.

 

All I cared about was how to develop speed, agility or strength.

 

Learn as much as I could about what exercises best developed blazing speed…

 

Understand which way of squatting was the most important to developing killer strength…

 

Tom taught me that the key to it all was in the way it was presented to the athlete.

 

After all, what’s the use of having the best training program in the entire world if your athletes aren’t even paying attention to you?

 

And that’s why I created the Complete Athlete Development Program.

 

It is a perfect combination of all my internationally field-tested training programs that have been proven effective in every continent in the world, along with the free bonus of my revolutionary Art of Coaching template.

 

After presenting a seminar in Phoenix last year to a group of me peers, I had one attendee post this message on a sport-based message board 2 days later –

 

“No insult to the other presenters, but Brian’s talk was the most engaging and enlightening… This man is a Coach – Capitalization intended”

 

I appreciated the comment, and you will appreciate the Art of Coaching template.

 

It’s exactly what you have been looking for to become the best Coach or Trainer possible.

 

And your athlete’s will appreciate it also.

 

Tom did.

 

Click on the link below and find out what you’ve been missing when it comes to becoming the best Trainer or Coach possible –

 

http://www.CompleteAthleteDevelopment.com/

 

 

‘Tlll next time,

 

Brian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Childhood Obesity Crisis Ends on Monday…

 

 

Something extraordinary is taking place on Monday.

 

And your name is written all over it.

 

One of the greatest problems in society today is going to start
meeting its match.

 

Childhood Obesity

 

And you will be on the front lines of that confrontation.

 

You know me as the ‘youth sports’ guy.

 

Trained thousands of young athletes all over the world.

 

But most don’t realize that in my 13 year career, I’ve also worked
with thousands of overweight and obese kids, as well.

 

In fact, some of my careers’ fondest memories are of helping kids
regain their self-esteem, their confidence or teaching them how to
include daily activity as a life long pursuit and love.

 

And on Monday, I am going to be releasing what I consider to be one
of the most important resources I’ve ever produced.

 

A tell-all look into how we, as an industry and society, can rid this
planet of childhood obesity forever.

 

It’s partly exercise.

 

Somewhat dietary.

 

And a lot to do with perspective and communication style.

 

I am thrilled to be offering this resource and know that every adult in
the world will benefit from reading the contents and understanding
my principles.

 

That’s all for now.

 

I’m going to email you again tomorrow with a few more details, but for
now, just know that Monday is the day we start to change childhood obesity in the world
together.

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Get High School Coaches to Like You

 

 

High School Coaches Do Need You

"The Head Football Coach just won’t listen to me… He
thinks he knows everything, but his training program is
terrible and his team would be so much better if he would
just hire me as the Strength Coach…"

 

Do you know how many times I hear that?

 

I get emails about it.

 

People talk with me about it at conferences.

 

It’s a common topic discussed on the IYCA Message Board.

 

And every single time, the follow up question reads something
like this –

 

"How can I get the Coach to trust and hire me?"

 

And here’s my standard answer…

 

Why would he?

 

From his perspective, who in the heck are you?

 

Do you know many ‘well credentialed’ Personal Trainers
there are in our industry who are absolute crap at what
they do?

 

Now, I’m sure that sounds like a negative slam, but it
really isn’t.

 

It’s a wake up call for you.

 

You have to PROVE to the Coach that you’re better.
Show him that you know more than him and more than
any other Trainers out there.

 

But you can’t prove that by ‘telling him so’ and then
walking away with your hands up in the air angry
that he isn’t listening.

 

I have made a career of gaining the trust of high school
coaches in various parts of the world and literally
having them beg me to train their athletes and teams.

 

Very few people in our industry can boast that kind of
success.

 

And here’s my secret….

 

I get someone else to do the talking for me.

 

Seriously.

 

I use my client referral network. 

 

I chat with satisfied parents who have connection to
the local high school coaches and athletic department and ask them
to consider chatting with the coach about me.

 

And when they do, that opens the door.

 

All I have to do is walk in.

 

Literally, I go from ‘just another Trainer trying to
work with my athletes’ to a ‘fantastic Trainer who is
coming highly recommended by the father of one of my
star players’.

 

See the difference?

 

And it works… Every time.

 

But you know what else works?

 

The right credentials.

 

With a certification from the IYCA, you can proudly
tell the coach that your expert training and education
is BASED on working with young athletes.

 

It’s not a certification that people suggest is the
‘Gold Standard’ but really doesn’t have much to do with
developmental athletic training – something critically
important to high school athletes.

 

And your certification doesn’t come from an organization
who offers 25 different kinds of educational streams from
‘Geriatric Fitness’ to ‘Pre-Natal care’.

 

It comes from an international association whose sole mission
is based on teaching Trainers to work effectively with
young athletes.

 

From Speed Training and Team Program Design to Strength
Development and The Art of Coaching.

 

I take great pride in being a Member of the IYCA.

 

And every single high school coach I have ever
talked with appreciates that I am equipped to work with
there athletes based on my IYCA affiliation.

 

Now that speaks volumes.

 

Our Level 1 – Youth Fitness Specialist certification is
your ticket ‘in’ my friend.

 

Get certified now to work with high school athletes and
teams for a fraction of what you’d have to pay for other
more generic educational opportunities.

 

Below is your exclusive link to the IYCA Level 1
material –

 

http://www.iyca.org/fitspecialist1

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian

 

P.S. – Did  you know that ALL IYCA Members are invited to
the Ryan Lee Boot Camp on September 21 to enjoy a live

 

Level 1 certification seminar being hosted by yours truly…
… For FREE!

 

Enjoy the event live and in person.

 

Ask me ANYTHING you want about training or business and more on high school coaches.

 

All for free.

 

Check out www.RyanLeeBootCamp.com for the details.

Athlete Development- What I Did in Australia…

 

Worldwide Athlete Development . A post From Brian Grasso.

I just got back from Australia…

…. And let me tell you – I am jet lagged!

The trip home from locations that far away are always

toughest.

I ended up flying from Melbourne to Auckland – Auckland to

Los Angeles – Los Angeles to Chicago.

Total time = 28 hours.

But it was worth every second.

Not only is it an honor to get invited to share my

knowledge worldwide, but it’s also incredibly enlightening

to sit in the audience and learn from other athlete development professionals.

Most of whom you may never have heard of.

This past week in Melbourne, I had the sincere pleasure of learning from my athlete development co-presenters, Douglas Heel from South Africa and Paul Taylor from Ireland.

And although we didn’t prepare any topics together,

we all ended up talking about the same general thing –

Communication.

Not one second of time was spent on discussing sets,

reps, exercises or programming.

All three of us lectured on the importance of

communication when it comes to your clients and athletes.

And our messages were 100% congruous:

The program doesn’t matter if your clients don’t

‘buy into’ the message.

Paul discussed this topic from his perspective as a

human behavior specialist.

Douglas from his specialty of sports medicine.

And of course I presented my take on the topic from

the perspective of a coach.

:: How do you coach young athletes who have different

personalities and learning styles?

:: What is the approach you use with high skill athletes

versus low skill athletes?

:: Why communication is the most important, but most

misunderstood part of producing champion athletes?

These are the main questions I answered during my two

hour lecture.

And the reality is that I took every second of my

presentation from the material contained in Complete

Athlete Development.

Not only has this all-inclusive package become known

worldwide as the number one collection of speed, strength,

flexibility and coordination athlete development training for

young athletes, but it also contains my own personal

coaching template that teaches you how to get the very

best out of each and every one of your young athletes.

I was overwhelmed at the conclusion of my seminar to

see and hear the audience so incredibly appreciative of

the information I provided.

Time for you to look at Complete Athletes Development and

see for yourself why ‘communication’ is the most critical

factor to developing championship young athletes.

Here’s a link for you to look at –

http://developingathletics.com/cad-short-copy.html

I’m off to get some sleep…

‘Till next time,

Brian