Archive for “Childhood Obesity” Tag

Tackling Childhood Obesity With Youth Fitness Training

Why Youth Fitness Training Is Needed Now More Than Ever!

youth fitness training

Great fitness professionals that have a passion for youth fitness training are needed now more than ever! Childhood Obesity is on the rise and so is the negative impact that this epidemic has on the youth.

I can share with you firsthand what it is like to be overweight as a child and have to suffer though the negative comments and teasing. Luckily I was an athlete so I was able to hide behind my talents on the field and court, but there are many kids that aren’t afforded that luxury.

The impact that youth fitness training can have in our society today is huge. Not only is this one of the fastest growing industries but it is also one of the most needed!

youth fitness training

Here are just a few reasons why we need more youth fitness training programs today:

– The path to obesity starts prior to children transitioning to a diet of solid foods

– 34% of 2-year-olds are obese or overweight. That’s a scary Childhood Obesity statistic.

– The CDC reports that childhood obesity has tripled over the past 3 decades

Those are upsetting statistics to say the least.

However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Fitness professionals get into this industry to help others and what better way to have a huge impact than to change the way our youth fitness training programs are run.

Kids no longer get adequate physical education time in schools and they certainly don’t play enough outdoors. They are pinned down in front of televisions, video games and other mindless forms of entertainment to keep them busy. 

There was never a need for youth fitness training programs when kids played, but now there is a need. A big one!

If you have a passion for working with youth and would like to start your youth fitness training program, click the image below to check out the Youth Fitness Specialist Certification and start making an impact today!

Youth Fitness Training

 

Kids Fitness: Missing the Point… Again

kids fitness

By Dr. Kwame M. Brown

It would help to read the following article before reading this post, but I will try to summarize below.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/features/article1689463.ece

The title of the article: “Is PE a waste of time?”, by Barbara Lantin of the Sunday Times. Yet another provocative title. I guess that’s useful, but the problem is that most do not read through articles like this. I do. So, I am going to first communicate that this title is not supported at ALL by the contents.

The gist here is the author and others grossly misinterpreting some longitudinal research done in the EarlyBird Diabetes Study in England.

The purpose of the study was to look at potential causal factors in the development of Type II (obese) diabetes. They studied overall activity levels of kids, and observed that no matter the activity level offered kids, they chose their own activity level (opting out or in) and effort level.

The researchers concluded from this that activity level must be genetically predetermined by some “activitystat” gene.

[dna]

Nice hypothesis, but there is one major problem with this conclusion:

Genes are old. The problems with rampant childhood obesity are relatively new. Therefore, we must consider… Gene expression itself is heavily determined / influenced by environment.

I am certain that such a genetically influenced trend like an “activitystat” exists.
To attribute it as the sole cause of many kids getting little to no exercise and kids fitness non existent at all is a fallacy.

They make some really strong conclusions on their website (while fighting for what is reportedly an unlikely funding renewal):

http://www.earlybirddiabetes.org/findings.php

Unfortunately, they make definitive statements like:

“Children’s activity not determined by environmental opportunity Green spaces and sports centres do not influence the physical activity of children Like most things biological, a child’s activity level seems to be ‘set’ by the brain, and therefore strongly defended against change”

What they are missing: No matter what exists in the environment – children don’t have cars. If the parent does not bring, the child does not go! Anyone who works with children every day would know this. So to look just at the presence of green spaces and centres “around” where the child lives is an insufficient parameter.

The author fails in the article “Is PE a waste of time” and the researchers fail in the findings section of their own website to recognize the interaction of availability of play spaces in the neighborhood with the will of the parent, despite saying right above…

“Obese children – parents unaware and unconcerned. Today’s parents are oblivious of their children’s weight. Parents are key partners in the drive to halt obesity, but will have little impact unless educated to recognize the problem”
So, let me get this straight: You are making the conclusion that low activity is genetically predetermined and highly resistant to change, but recognize parental education as a major factor? How can both be true? C’mon SON!!!

Now, I will turn my attention to the title “Is PE a waste of time”. Clearly not, if well designed, by their own admission, because also in the findings section of the EarlyBird website is the following:

Children who keep active are no lighter, but they are metabolically healthier: The UK and US Governments advise at least 60 minutes moderate physical activity every day.

Only 42% of the EarlyBird boys and 11% of the girls met this guideline consistently over the three-year period from 5-8yr. Importantly (because governments use BMI as their outcome measure), there were no differences in the trend for BMI over the four time points in either sex, but the more active children became metabolically healthier.

The study questions the utility of BMI as the outcome measure of physical activity programmes in children and also whether the bar for girls should be lowered (girls systematically record less physical activity than boys). (Metcalf BS – Arch Dis Child 2008).

Look at the last statement above – BMI has been consistently used as a parameter for years in studies on childhood obesity / inactivity. This is why the article and many others are missing the point. This is not about weight. It is about the habits that CREATE the higher weight in some kids, but adversely AFFECT ALL CHILDREN.

In conclusion:

Despite my bashing this study, it provides some really valuable information on kids fitness. Pretty well designed and executed (it seems), the EarlyBird study helps us delve deeper in to the causal factors in childhood obesity/inactivity.

My quarrel is with the conclusions made by some of the researchers, and with the result that this will have in creating a certain appearance to the layperson. As an aside, I never use the term layperson in an insulting way. I know very little about solar panel engineering, so I am a layperson. It has nothing to do with intelligence level, just amount and intensity of study

Is PE a waste of time? If you only care about what children weigh when left to their own devices, yes. But yet again, I feel compelled to say as I often have – obesity is the sneeze.

Physical play, when done with children’s needs (and yes, wants) in mind, treats the disease of inactivity and lack of physical enjoyment. PE that concentrates on caloric expenditure and measuring BMI treats the symptom. This placates politicians and statisticians, but does very little for children.

Children need thoughtful play time and play spaces dedicated to and designed for their natural proclivities. They also need time playing with adults. Furthermore, adults need to be proactive in providing healthy foods to support the play.

Help End The Madness!

Click Here Right Now to Become a certified Youth Fitness Specialist Right Now and Contribute to the Solution of Youth Inactivity:

IYCA Family Member Creates ‘True Youth Sports’

Program Developed to Make a Difference in youth sports & Fitness

 

Determined to make a dent in local youth obesity rates, a Brampton fitness professional is launching what he calls the city’s first fitness camp designed exclusively to help children foster a lifelong love of healthy living.

 

"Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions with factors such as fast food, computers, TV, video games, all contributing to the problem," said David Kittner, founder of True Youth Sports Brampton Fit Camp.

 

"Over 50 per cent of our children are overweight and almost 20 per cent are obese. We’re elated to begin offering the True Youth Sports Brampton Fit Camp program to help combat this problem and to introduce kids, ages eight to 13, to a healthy fitness lifestyle in a safe, fun, and non-intimidating format."

 

A report released by Peel Public Health earlier this year entitled "A Picture of Health" reveals 47 per cent of the Region’s 1.2 million population is overweight or obese.

 

The report findings also show that many youngsters in Peel struggle with weight as a result of lack of exercise.

 

With obesity rates among youngsters hitting dangerous levels, Kittner, a fitness expert with more than 15 years of experience, said he felt compelled to do something about it.

 

This led to the idea of introducing a proper fitness camp for children that strives to instill the importance of being active early on.

 

"It’s sad to see how many unhealthy kids there are out there," Kittner said. "The vast majority of kids today have sedentary lifestyles even if they’re participating in organized sports activities … so offering this much needed program was a no-brainer."

 

Kittner said the True Youth Sports Brampton Fit Camp training system has been developed by the world’s leading youth fitness organization, the International Youth Conditioning Association, and will be delivered by certified fitness professionals who will help motivate and inspire the kids to be active and have fun.  

 

"Our programs are designed with safety and fun in mind; if it’s not fun, kids are not going to stick with youth sports," he said.

 

 

Childhood Obesity: The Threat To Youth Fitness

 

 

Childhood Obesity

Liz D:

I’ve posted a question on a local moms forum asking what parents think are the root causes of Childhood Obesity/inactivity.

 

Certainly the typical ideas came forth: too much fast food, lack of exercise, not getting kids engaged in good habits early.

 

One idea did strike me and I’ve heard other moms tell me this. Heck, I even live this circumstance now:

 

One serious threat to youth activity is the lack of safety in our neighborhoods. We have so much access to information that we know when a sex offender moves into the ‘hood. We also hear about creeps on the news and evildoers who have even taken a child, hand-in-hand away from her backyard to bring her off premises.

 

With all this scary stuff afoot, moms and dads are definitely afraid to give their young kids especially too much liberty outside.

 

Has anyone ever polled parents to see if this comes up? Heck, for you IYCA parents out there, is this a factor in your life? Is organized sports the only recourse people see? Is there a solution to this or at least a good rib-tickling one-liner I can give these people? (Just goofing there)

 

Please chime in on your ideas.

 

(more…)

Physical Education Injuries: 150% Increase

Physical Education Injuries alarm bells

IYCA Member, Mike Howard, sent me a link to this incredible article.

 

I was floored.

 

Stunned.

 

And completely annoyed.

 

150% increase Physical Education injuries.

 

Read the article and then be sure to leave me your comments about
why exactly you think this has become such a problem.

 

I feel very strongly that I know the answer.

 

And tomorrow I’m going to tell you what it is.

 

But for now, I want to hear your thoughts.

 

Here’s the article:

 

 

New national study finds increase in P.E. class-related injuries

 

Annual number of cases increased 150 percent from 1997-2007

 

Physical education (PE) in schools is one of the main tools used to increase physical activity and to prevent childhood obesity, and PE-related injuries are on the rise. Although increasing physical activity may reduce obesity, it may also increase the risk of injury. While recognizing that PE classes and physical activity are important components in combating obesity, parents and school administrators should remain vigilant for injuries. A recent study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, found that the number of PE-related injuries to elementary, middle and high school students in the United States increased 150 percent between 1997 and 2007.

 

According to the study, published in the online issue of Pediatrics, the most common PE-related injuries were lower-extremity sprains and strains (23 percent), followed by upper extremity sprains and strains (14 percent) and fractures (14 percent). Middle school-aged children (11-14 years of age) accounted for the majority of PE-related injuries (52 percent). Elementary school-aged children (5-10 years of age) had almost double the odds of a head injury, compared with other injuries.

 

Nearly 70 percent of PE-related injuries occurred while children were participating in six activities (running, basketball, football, volleyball, soccer and gymnastics). Injuries were caused by contact with another person, playing surface, equipment, stationary structures, pulled muscles, overuse and activity-related illnesses such as heat stroke.

 

"The 150 percent increase in PE-related injuries presenting to emergency departments was consistent across gender and age groups. It is unlikely that this increase was attributable to an increase in PE participation," explained study author Lara McKenzie, PhD, principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and faculty member of The Ohio State University College of Medicine. "Identifying patterns of PE-related injuries is the first step toward preventing them. Injury prevention education should be made a priority for all PE activities, especially for those activities with the highest injury rates."

 

This is the first published study to examine PE-related injuries on a national level. Data for this study were collected from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), which is operated by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The NEISS dataset provides information on consumer product-related and sports and recreation-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments across the country.

 

The Childhood Obesity Crisis Ends on Monday…

 

 

Something extraordinary is taking place on Monday.

 

And your name is written all over it.

 

One of the greatest problems in society today is going to start
meeting its match.

 

Childhood Obesity

 

And you will be on the front lines of that confrontation.

 

You know me as the ‘youth sports’ guy.

 

Trained thousands of young athletes all over the world.

 

But most don’t realize that in my 13 year career, I’ve also worked
with thousands of overweight and obese kids, as well.

 

In fact, some of my careers’ fondest memories are of helping kids
regain their self-esteem, their confidence or teaching them how to
include daily activity as a life long pursuit and love.

 

And on Monday, I am going to be releasing what I consider to be one
of the most important resources I’ve ever produced.

 

A tell-all look into how we, as an industry and society, can rid this
planet of childhood obesity forever.

 

It’s partly exercise.

 

Somewhat dietary.

 

And a lot to do with perspective and communication style.

 

I am thrilled to be offering this resource and know that every adult in
the world will benefit from reading the contents and understanding
my principles.

 

That’s all for now.

 

I’m going to email you again tomorrow with a few more details, but for
now, just know that Monday is the day we start to change childhood obesity in the world
together.

 

‘Till next time,

 

Brian