Archive for “Uncategorized” Category

Whole-Part Coaching of the Hip Turn for young athletes

 

Young athletes hip turn whole-part coaching

By Dave Gleason

 

Coaching any exercise to Young Athletes
can be challenging.

One of the most effective methods is to break down an activity into its
component parts, often times all the way down to the smallest or
simplest part possible.
 
This is very true when teaching the hip turn, especially to younger
(10-13 year old) athletes.  Unfolding this movement for Young Athletes
in an effort teach them how and why hip/shoulder disassociation is
crucial for their long term success.
 
At Athletic Revolution we use a 1-2-3 method to take full advantage of
variable learning styles and we have found that this tactic works
extremely well for our younger athletes.
 

 
Have fun and change lives!

IYCA Member Spotlight: Melissa Lambert



IYCA Youth Fitness Specialist Spotlight

IYCA youth fitness specialist

 

I am licensed professional counselor in the state of Connecticut
and work as a child and adolescent clinician at Natchaug Hospital.
I graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Eastern
Connecticut State University and was a four year collegiate soccer
player earning All-Region and All-New England accolades as a
defender. I completed my Master’s degree in Clinical Mental
Health Counseling with a concentration in child and adolescent
psychology at Springfield College.

 

My experience includes working inpatient, partial hospital
programs, in-home therapy for children and adolescents in crisis, facilitating
parenting classes and writing articles for parenting magazines. I
enforce the importance of movement and play with both children
and their families. I also work on youth nutrition with children

who are currently taking psychiatric medications that often
cause weight gain.

 

In addition, I’m an assistant soccer coach for the U-16 girls’
Southeast Premier Soccer Club and run high school soccer
strength and conditioning clinics. I currently have the following

IYCA
certifications: Youth Fitness Specialist 1, High School
Strength and Conditioning, Youth Nutrition and Youth Fitness

for children with Special Needs.

The IYCA certifications have Impacted my work as both a therapist and coach.

 

I feel the overall philosophy of the program can be utilized when
working with any group of kids, whether it’s fitness related or not.
The IYCA emphasizes building upon the child’s current strengths
while empowering them to become better athletes with a focus
on injury prevention. I like the break down on how to work with

specific athletes based on both the level of skill and motivation.

 

The course material is easy to understand and can be applied
in various environments. I use many of the youth nutrition
handouts with both children in therapy and my high school
athletes as well as incorporating the games from the youth
fitness certification into group therapy.

 

In relation to coaching, my strength and conditioning clinic
sessions were based on the principles provided in the high
school strength and conditioning book (mobility, dynamic
stretching vs. static stretching, speed and agility with emphasis
on decelerating and accelerating properly, etc.) I would recommend
any professional working with children and adolescents (coaches,
various teachers, therapists and other childcare providers) to
become certified through the IYCA organization.

 

Give Yourself the Coaching Edge…For Just $1

Right now, you have the opportunity to give yourself the competitive
edge over every other coach in your area.

 

You have the opportunity to make your athletes better. You have the
opportunity to make your career better. You have the opportunity to
join a team of motivated, like-minded trainers and coaches that are
committed to being the best in the industry.

 

All by becoming part of IYCA Members.

 

So the question is this:

 

Are you committed to being the best coach you can possibly be?

 

If the answer is ‘Yes’ then don’t wait another second… Join IYCA
Members For Just $1 Today!

 

http://iyca.org/membership/

‘Base Building’ for High School Athletes?


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High School Athletes coaching should focus on the five biomotor abilities. By Latif Thomas

When my mother attended her first ever Parent-Teacher Conference, she expected Mrs. Candlette to tell her how smart I was. Or how polite I was. Or to hear about some other facet of my considerable six year old intellect…

 

Instead, the first teacher to parent description to fall upon her ears was,

 

“Wow, Latif sure can run fast!”

 

What can I say? I owned Duck, Duck, Goose!

 

So, when I arrived at the University of Connecticut, track and field scholarship in hand, I thought I was well on my way to the Olympic Games.

 

You can imagine my horror when, a few weeks before the start of my first Indoor Track Season, my coach pulled me into his office. He told me, not so subtly, that I was being red shirted. He then told me, not so subtly, that he thought I was a fluke. That he had no idea, based on what he saw from me that fall, how I possibly ran 10.8 for 100m, 22.1 for 200m or 48.8 for 400m as a 16 year old. (That was pretty good for New England back in the mid ’90s.) He then reminded me that scholarships are year to year and that I was not on pace to have mine renewed!

 

I slowly shuffled back to my dorm in a state of panic and disbelief.

 

How did it get to this point? I work my butt off. And I set all types of records when I was a high school athletes.

 

Sure, I had lost the bulk of my senior year to a torn hamstring. But, how was I supposed to know to do a ‘dynamic warm up’ before a race? I didn’t know what that was. My hamstring was tight that day, so I static stretched it even harder. (more…)

Coaching Young Athletes : Use Feedback as Proprioception

 

 

Brain Food for Coaching Young Athletes.

  by Phil Hueston, NASM-PES; IYCA-YFS

 

Your feedback and communication is brain food when it comes to coaching young athletes.

To develop correctly and effectively, young athlete’s brains need a steady flow of quality nutrients and stimuli. Neural development and conditioning is a process that never really ceases, at least not until brain function does. Since none of us train zombies, let’s focus on how we affect brain development, especially synaptic development, through communication, feedback and the impact of both on proprioception with our living clients.

 

While synaptic structural growth is activity-independent, that is it’s spontaneous, part of the normal physical development of the neuro-muscular system, synaptic performance and modification, delivery efficiency and transient synapse termination require neural activity. By extension, then, all synaptic impulses are affected by previous proprioception. Spatial and kinesthetic differentiation, spatial awareness, force development, stabilization, deceleration and force application are all impacted by the billions of proprioceptive signals processed by synapses.

 

It’s reasonable to state, then, that the development and performance of synapses is affected by the quality (and quantity) of feedback and communication received by the sensory organs. Emotional response to sensory organ proprioception creates new “sub-signals” if you will, that affect the processing of and response to proprioceptive input. That’s because part of the neural response to stimulus is conditioned (more…)

Punch Cuts & Their Value In Developing Multi-Directional Speed

 

By James Herrick


Punch Cuts

 Every parent, coach and athlete involved in team sports realizes the importance of having speed. It gives players a distinct advantage over slower opponents.

Although it is not the easiest skill to improve, with persistence players can clearly get better over time. It takes a combination of technical skill training, improved strength and power, and a lower percentage of excess body mass to see noticeable changes.

There are literally thousands of videos, books, and drills out there today that proclaim they can help athletes build speed. But if you had to take just one idea that can make players faster in the shortest amount of time, the one I’d recommend developing first above all others is the ‘punch cut’.

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Playoff Ready

 

by Carlo Alvarez

Playoff Season

 The high school football playoff season is upon us. Most team have played ten regular season games and are preparing to play another four to five games in their journey to the State Championship game. For those of you who coach or train high school football teams, I’m sure you understand how difficult a full season can be for an athlete. But, if you have made it this far, I assume that you have done some things right and your hard work has paid off. My goal in writing this article is to provide our readers a few key points to help you prepare your athletes for the grueling coming weeks and intensity of the playoff season.

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Creating a Training System That Works

 

 

by Wil Fleming

 

I remember vividly 3 years ago at this time Ryan and I were working our tails off to get ready for our grand opening that was only a couple weeks away. It was a really exciting time for us.

 

We were assembling all the equipment we ordered.

 

We were trying to figure out how to lay 1500 square feet of turf.

 

We were holding free workouts in our PARKING LOT to gain momentum.

 

We knew what we wanted our business to be, and we had a plan to make that happen:

 

A place that actually promised results to their clients and athletes.

 

A place for athletes to train to become the best they can be in their sport.

 

Three years later, we are doing just that, we have put 50 kids in collegiate athletics, we have helped a dozen high school teams reach their best seasons in years, and we have helped 1000′s of kids become better athletes.

 

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Medicine Balls: Increase Speed and Agility for Athletes

Are Medicine Balls A Good Tool for Training
Speed and Agility For Athletes

Check out the video below to learn what medicine balls drills we use to help develop speed and agility for athletes in our training programs.

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Is Your Training Program Complete?

 

 

by Wil Fleming

 

The other day a track coach that I really respect called me to discuss an athlete that we both work with and right away I knew he was excited. I could hear in his voice that he was just fired up. I asked him what was going on and he responded,
"Coach Flem I have to tell you the coolest thing, Anthony has gotten 3 feet faster just training with you this summer and fall. (meaning his long jump approach had to be moved back 3 feet on the same number of approach steps) What kind of speed work have you been doing?"

 

 

Honestly, the answer was very little, outside of some very short acceleration work, this athlete’s focus had been on improving his explosive strength recently.

 

So what’s the point of this story?

 

(more…)

Deliver Your Best Youth Training Session Ever

Youth Athletic Development: Deliver Your Best Youth Training Session Ever

In this video, IYCA expert Dave Gleason reminds us to meet our young athletes where they are to develop a physical culture and encourage youth athletic development.

Find out how Dave facilitated one of his best youth training sessions ever.

 

(more…)

Developing Relationships with Sports Coaches and Athletes

 

by Ryan Ketchum

Sports Coaches and Athletes

 

 

In the past 6 years of coaching athletes and running a youth fitness business there is one obstacle that always presents itself when working with older athletes.

How do I get in with the coach?

This is a question that I get frequently when helping our Athletic Revolution franchisees and other business coaching clients that have youth fitness programs. It is something that I deal with on a daily basis in my own business attempting to make contacts, grow our current network and increase our membership.

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Getting Your High School Athletes Faster

 

 

by Wil Fleming

 

The biggest mistake in training athletes to get faster.

 

 

Both speed and agility are critically important for athletes to be successful on the field. Unfortunately I see plenty of programs or services offered by coaches that are skewed in the wrong direction, they promise to "decrease your 40 time" or "drop your home to first time".  While both of these things are important in the recruitment of athletes, they are not critically important to the performance of athletes.  Training speed and agility in some cases, verges on running some sprints and breaking out the agility ladder.

 

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Sports Skill Acquisition – 5 Tips for Young Athletes

by Dr. Toby Brooks

Sports Skill Acquisition

 

As a lover of all things sport since a child, my entire life has been shaped by decisions motivated primarily by how I might continue to play or be involved in competitive athletics.  It might come as little surprise, then, that my most recent (and with any luck final) professional relocation to work at Texas Tech University was at least partially motivated by a desire to provide additional athletic opportunities for my children should they choose to play sports, too.  Compared to my family’s previous home, west Texas provides significantly better opportunities, coaching, and facilities for most team sports, and Lubbock also affords access to other potential athletic exposures simply not possible where we lived before.  Simply put, should my kids decide to play or compete in just about anything short of surfing, Lubbock offers them a better chance to maximize their abilities.  And so far, they have both taken a liking to softball (daughter Brynnan, age 7) and baseball (son Taye, age 4).

That said, in my role as the IYCA’s Director of Education, as a scholar, and as an athletic trainer and a strength and conditioning specialist, I have staked my reputation behind the simple belief that early sport specialization is detrimental to the long-term success of most developing athletes.  Despite the growing trend of professional level coaching, year round travel and elite teams, and high dollar training centers catered specifically for youth, I believe that the science supports multilateral skill acquisition over early specialization any day.  How can I then espouse such beliefs on one hand yet subject my own children to the very same well intentioned yet subtly misguided behaviors on the others?  The short answer is I don’t.

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Periodization for the Young Athlete

Young Athlete

by Toby Brooks, PhD, ATC, CSCS, PES, YFS3

 

Periodization for Young Athletes Training Chart

Originally developed by Romanian exercise scientist Tudor Bompa for a number of Eastern Bloc countries in the early sixties, periodization involves the breakdown of the annual conditioning plan into specific training phases intended to maximize training effectiveness and sport-specific strength and skill acquisition. In practice, a periodized conditioning program might involve a strength phase followed by a power phase, then the power phase followed by an endurance phase. The model has been widely researched and the consistent positive benefits of periodized training programs are largely credited for the rise to prominence on the global athletic stage many Eastern Bloc countries enjoyed following implementation of Bompa’s methods.

 

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My Thoughts on Youth Training

by IYCA Board of Experts member Mike Robertson of Robertson Training Systems

 

 

As many of you already know, a huge section of our clientele at IFAST is young athletes.

 

With kids as young as 11, up to those finishing off their high school career, I can say without reservation the most enjoyable part of my day as a coach is working with these kids.

 

Let me tell you a little bit about my background as an athlete, before we go any further – My Sporting Background

 

Growing up, I lived in the country and didn’t have a ton of other kids around.  In fact, I’m pretty sure my next door neighbors were already 80 at this point in time so chances are Junior wasn’t in shape to whip the baseball around!

 

Luckily, I had a strong imagination and a basketball hoop, which I could shoot on for all hours of the day.

 

Sports were always a huge component of my life.  In high school alone I lettered in basketball, volleyball, baseball, and even cross country.* When I went to college and played in the intramural system at Ball State, that scope got even wider.

 

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Pre-Tournament Nutrition With Dr. Chris Mohr

 

Nutrition

Q: What foods should you eat to start your day when you are going to play in an all day tournament?

 

A: First, I’ll assume that you’re planning to wake up early enough to have something somewhat substantial and are not just rolling out of bed and running out the door.

 

When you’re preparing for several games during the day. If you read nothing else, pay attention closely to this …

 

Stick with what you know and don’t try new foods on the day of competition. Or even the day before competition. I once worked with a client who came to me after she had a bad day on the field hockey field. She was hungry, a coach told her carbohydrates were important and that fiber was important, so with a large bran muffin as an option, she chose that. Unfortunately for her, her body wasn’t used to that much fiber…and she had a few GI issues during that day of tournaments that kept her cramped and certainly not performing at her peak (or at all in this case).

 

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Your Thoughts On ‘Elite’ Youth Sports

This past week the following article about ‘Elite’ youth sports was featured on ESPN.com:

 

 

http://espn.go.com/espn/commentary/story/_/page/keown-110823/elite-travel-baseball-basketball-teams-make-youth-sports-industrial-complex

 

This is a topic I’ve had strong feelings about for 15 years, but I’m more interested in your thoughts.

 

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Connecting With Local High Schools

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post for all IYCA members on how to use bands to get involved with a high school:  Opening The Door To Youth Sports In Your Area

 

Youth Sports

I recently received this email from a local trainer that I thought was very appropriate to share with all of you.

 

If you are looking for a way to provide coaches with something that will not only make their athletes better but also provide them a solution to a very common problem, resistance bands may be the answer.

 

This could very easily be you sending me this email in the near future.

 

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